Author Archives: Fred Langa

Fred Langa

About Fred Langa

Fred Langa is senior editor. His LangaList Newsletter merged with Windows Secrets on Nov. 16, 2006. Prior to that, Fred was editor of Byte Magazine (1987 to 1991) and editorial director of CMP Media (1991 to 1996), overseeing Windows Magazine and others.

Duck And Cover

In "Space Stations Keep Fallin’
On My Head…" ( http://www.langalist.com/newsletters/2001/2001-03-12.htm#9
) I mentioned how the Russian Mir station will be deorbited soon (as of now,
it’s scheduled for this week). If all goes according to plan, many tons of
high-velocity, incendiary rubble will splash down in the South Pacific. (The
bigger chunks will not burn up in the atmosphere.)

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The Heat Is On

Heat-related PC problems are
surprisingly common, as this note from reader Don Schwab illustrates:

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More Help For WinME/9x Users

Reader Stephen Kobsa found a good
source of additional tweaking info for people trying to get more from WinME—
or even Win9x in general:

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HotSpots Sizzling

This newsletter comes out 
twice-weekly, but my "Web HotSpots" page is updated fully 365 times a
year—a new site very day, without fail. As such, it’s a great mechanism to
bring you brand-new, just-available sites. Often, great new sites will show up
in HotSpots before I can mention them here in the newsletter.

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Is This Information Interesting? Useful?

If you think the LangaList is a
worthwhile read, maybe a friend would find it useful too! Just use the following
link to recommend the LangaList—your friend may find a new source of useful
information and you just may win $10,000 for your trouble (full details also
available via this link): http://www.recommend-it.com/l.z.e?s=143182

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Rosetta Stone Even *More* Improved!

OK, quick recap:

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More On That ” 1,000 GB CD”

In "A CD That Holds 1,000
Gigabytes?" ( http://www.langa.com/newsletters/2001/2001-03-01.htm#7
) I told you about an emerging technology that will allow a normal-seeming CD to
have up to about 100 thin optical "platters" embedded inside it,
allowing the CD to hold over a terabyte of information!

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