Author Archives: Michael Lasky

Michael Lasky

About Michael Lasky

WS contributing editor Michael Lasky is a freelance writer based in Oakland, California, who has 20 years of computer-magazine experience, most recently as senior editor at PC World.

Dropbox: File synching and sharing made easy

There’s no shortage of services offering file sharing, synching, and collaboration through the Internet.

But one service stands out from the rest. Dropbox is one of those simple applications that, once installed, quickly become an indispensable part of your computing process.

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Run Windows on iPad using remote-computing apps

Windows users might dismiss Apple’s new ultra-light, ultra-sleek iPad as just another frivolous toy for Mac heads.

But add remote-computing software and services, and the iPad’s combination of light weight and nicely sized screen makes Apple’s pad a dandy Windows terminal.

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SkyDrive takes on the online-storage arena

Office 2010 marked Microsoft’s aggressive entrance into the cloud-computing arena, and Sky Drive is a key component of the company’s move to online services.

Part of the new Windows Live service, SkyDrive offers generous — and free — online data storage and simple collaboration. But there are other cloud-based services that provide more features and better options.

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The long wait for 64-bit PC software continues

Even though 64-bit PCs have been available for seven years, the promise of 64-bit computing has been delayed by a dearth of 64-bit software.

The situation is improving — slowly — but many major PC applications remain 32-bit affairs.

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Obscure Win7 tools can save you time and trouble

Some of Windows 7′s best new features aren’t so easy to find.

These include a problem recorder to aid tech support, a list of the programs affected by a System Restore, more precise power adjustments for notebooks and netbooks, and keyboard shortcuts that open system resources.

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Dell and HP balk at replacing bad Nvidia chip

An old urban myth claims that the microprocessors used in PCs and other consumer electronics are designed to fail within days or weeks of their warranty expiration.

For tens of thousands of people who bought Dell and HP notebooks whose motherboards fried — often a few weeks after their warranty expired — there’s nothing mythical about it.

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