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  1. #1
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    Justify my text (2003)

    Sometimes when I justify a paragraph the few words of the last line are spread out across the page. How can I prevent/ correct this? Thanks, Andy

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: Justify my text (2003)

    Make sure that you have used a paragraph break (Enter) and not a manual line break (Shift+Enter). The easiest way to check this is to show non-printing characters by clicking the Show/Hide ¶ button on the toolbar. A paragraph break looks like ¶ and a manual line break like the arrow on the Return key.

  3. #3
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    Re: Justify my text (2003)

    Thanks, Andy.

  4. #4
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    Re: Justify my text (2003)

    I never justify text any more. In the days of fixed-width fonts, left-justified text often looked rather messy, but nowadays, with proportional fonts and flexible spacing between words and sentences, it usually looks just as good as fully justified text, if not better.

    (And I always fear that Microsoft will tell me that my words cannot be justified by any means <img src=/S/grin.gif border=0 alt=grin width=15 height=15>)

  5. #5
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    Re: Justify my text (2003)

    What did one little grey cell tell the grey cells next to him?

    ‘I know what comes next.’

    What? they cried. You mean you know the plot?

    Not at all, the little grey cell replied: ‘I know where the line ends’.

    The benefit of left-justified text is that because the ends of the lines wander as you read down the page, you have a mental picture of where the next line should end, and you will read more smoothly and swiftly than you would if all lines were the same length.

    This only applies to material that is extended and continuous, such as a novel or an essay or certain communications, and usually not in a column. If you are ‘studying’ instead of ‘reading’, then not only is justified text justified, but it may conveniently include any number of callouts, text frames, tables (which may contain monospaced type) and so forth. If you are reading a magazine which is loaded with advertisements and artwork, then all bets are off, and it may vary from page to page. Plays are a typographic madhouse. A play is meant to be performed, and you must be either studying it or memorizing it as an actor to be reading it at all.

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