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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    Making a Custom Template in Word

    I was trying to make a new template for my Word document. I varied a few of the styles and took them off of the Normal styles. I saved the template as a new template called "Classic Template". Now the new template appeared, with "Document 3" attached to it.

    This Document 3 has Classic Template as its template with all of my changes.
    But if I open my original document, under properties it says it is using Classic template - but if I take a look at the styles, they are not the styles that I created. They are all based on Normal, etc. I tried opening a new document with my new template, but again the styles are not how I designed them! Whereas, if I go back to Document 3, it is Classic template with all the right styles. What is going on? <img src=/S/doh.gif border=0 alt=doh width=15 height=15>

    If you can help me with this problem, I would really appreciate it! <img src=/S/clapping.gif border=0 alt=clapping width=19 height=23> Thanks.

    Avrohom

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: Making a Custom Template in Word

    Welcome to Woody's Lounge!

    I don't quite understand what you mean by
    <hr>Now the new template appeared, with "Document 3" attached to it.<hr>
    Attached to the name? Or to the file? Or ...

    If you wish, you can create a zip file from the template, and attach the template to a reply in this thread. That would enable people to investigate the template.
    (If the template contains proprietary information, please remove that before zipping)

  3. #3
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Re: Making a Custom Template in Word

    Just as an FYI, attaching a document to a new template usually does not update the existing style definitions. If you want to replace the existing style definitions in a document with those in an newly attached template, you can use the "Organizer" to copy them into the document (three times seems to be the magic number because often some styles are variations on others, and these dependencies are not always resolved correctly during the initial copy).

    It seems more and more difficult to locate the Organizer in the menus. <img src=/S/smile.gif border=0 alt=smile width=15 height=15> I generally use the button in the Macros dialog to get at it, and then switch to the Styles tab. In Word 2007, hmmm, I don't know.

  4. #4
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: Making a Custom Template in Word

    > If you want to replace the existing style definitions in a document with those in an newly attached template, you can use the "Organizer"

    A much easier way to replace the existing style definitions with the ones in a template is to check the option "Automatically update document styles..." when you attach the new template.

    StuartR

  5. #5
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Re: Making a Custom Template in Word

    Thanks, Stuart. I've never tried that.

  6. #6
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    Re: Making a Custom Template in Word

    Yes Stuart, that is what I was looking for:
    on the Templates and Add-ons dialogue box there is a box which needs to be checked:
    "Automatically update document styles".

    I actually did a Google search and found a document "Template Basics in Microsoft Word" which discussed this -- amongst many other topics.

    Thanks everyone for your help!

    Avrohom

  7. #7
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    Re: Making a Custom Template in Word

    (Edited by Leif to make link live - see the quick guide and/or <!help=19>Help 19<!/help> - it's really not that difficult and is very helpful to others.)
    ~~~~~

    WARNING!!! This is NOT the last word!

    I had emailed this question to my Technical Writing instructor, and she responded saying we were taught NOT to check this box!

    So I was very confused. I did another Google search. I arrived at the following link:

    http://www.shaunakelly.com/word/numbering/...eNumbering.html

    Here she explains that this box must NOT be checked for Heading Numbering and other things to work well.

    So I clicked on Mrs. Kelly's suggestions on working with templates and styles. She has three suggestions:

    * You can change a style in a document's parent template. In the Modify Style dialog box, you tick the Add to Template box.

    * You can copy styles from the document to its template, or vice versa. To do that, Tools > Templates and Add‑Ins. Click Organizer.

    * You can update the document with its template's styles. To do that, Tools > Templates and Add‑Ins. Tick the Automatically Update Document Styles box. Then, immediately go back and un-tick that box. Don't leave the box ticked.

    So you see she agrees this box can be checked. But immediately afterwards it must be unchecked -- so things don't get messed up.

    Rather confusing.

    Thanks for your help.

    Avrohom

  8. #8
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: Making a Custom Template in Word

    In general, it's not advisable to leave "Automatically Update Document Styles" turned on permanently, unless you want to prevent yourself (or other users) from accidentally modifying a style. But turning it on, then off again can be very useful.

    Similarly, it is not a good idea to set a style to "Automatically Update" in the Modify Style dialog - an accidental change in a single paragraph could have unpleasant consequences for the rest of the document. But if you want to modify a style, it can be handy to turn on the feature until you're done, then turn it off again. The advantage is that you can see the effect of your changes immediately (and Ctrl+Z is your friend if you mess up).

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