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  1. #1
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    Microsoft Web browser (97 and 2000)

    I created a PowerPoint Presentation and saved it as a Web Page. I opened a database (access 97) and created a new form in design view. I selected Microsoft Web Browser from the More Controls button and placed a browser control on my form. I added code to bring in my PP presentation into the browser control under the load event for the form. To make a long story short - When I open the form, the presentation is very slow to load and going from one slide to the next is very slow. I created the same procedure in Access 2000 and the presentation is OK - not slow. Does anyone know why 97 is so slow? I have to use 97.

    I figured it out. The database that is slow is on a share drive on the network. The other database is on my C: drive. Why would the network drive be so slow?

  2. #2
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    Re: Microsoft Web browser (97 and 2000)

    That's a problem for you network administrator. Is the whole database on the network drive or just the data? Is the power point presentation on the network drive as well?
    Charlotte

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    Re: Microsoft Web browser (97 and 2000)

    The whole database is on the network drive. The PowerPoint presentation is on the network drive also. The PowerPoint presentation has to be on the share drive so everyone can see it.

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    Re: Microsoft Web browser (97 and 2000)

    Then I'm not surprised at the slowness. You're running/moving everything, including two applications across a network connection, and that should slow down either version, although 2000 should still run somewhat faster than 97. The network's speed is affected by all the *other* traffic on it as well, and if two people run the thing at the same time, you'll see even worse performance.
    Charlotte

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    Re: Microsoft Web browser (97 and 2000)

    Is there something I am missing - you don't have to put everything on the network for the people to access it? I am new to database design so I am sorry if I sound naive. How do people run a shared database if not on a network? Thanks for your help.

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    Re: Microsoft Web browser (97 and 2000)

    I'm not exactly clear on what is going on... Does it run perfectly in Access 2k? No reduction in response time?
    Are these 2 apps (A97 and 2k) on the same machine?
    If not, does that other machine have a different video card (with extended memory)?
    <img src=/S/scratch.gif border=0 alt=scratch width=25 height=29>

    It could all depend on the content of your presentation.
    Are there hi-res graphics or photos in it?
    Did you go wild on animation segments?
    Are you trying to view it full screen? (this depends on the amount of extended memory in your video card...if you've got that)

    Network response time is based on a concept similar to cable modems and bandwidth.
    What you have in this case are collisions...users' packets of data flying in and out of the hubs.
    It is a basic fact that response time from a network drive is much slower compared to a local drive.
    Other users sharing the same plumbing is inevitable.

    Potential solution: Try trimming down the graphics aspect of it, by either eliminating some or optimizing them.
    If you have graphics, 86 the animation sequences and see if that improves response time.

    Troubleshooting why it works with one app and not the other requires strict controls.
    If you are absolutely positive that all factors are the same, there is a possiblity that A2k has an enhanced library that supports the video or Web integration better. Seeing that it is a later version, that should come as no surprise.
    I wish I could've been more specific and helpful.

  7. #7
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    Re: Microsoft Web browser (97 and 2000)

    I don't know if this is still a current thread or not, but I'll take a whack at it.

    1. Look into "splitting" your database. Charlotte mentioned it in passing, but it's probably the single best step you can take. Each user should have the "front end" on their workstations. Only the "back end" and your ppt presentation should be on the server.

    2. Is a browser control necessary? You should be able to launch your browser from a "lightweight" form that has just a hyperlink to the top page of your presentation. I think "lightweight" forms were new in 2000, but you might look into them. I see you're stuck using '97, so this one may not help, but it's been a while since I worked with that version, so I might be wrong.

    3. The main problem you'll have with this setup is to force users to update their "front end" software when a new version is available. Do this in your Autoexec proc by storing a version number or version date in a one-record table in the backend, and a similar piece of data in your front-end, and then compare the two at startup. If the two versions don't agree, pop up a modal form alerting the user that there's a new version available and how to get it, and then use an OK button to close Access so they can't ignore you. There's a "clever" way to do this update dynamically, but this simpler approach has worked fine for me in the past.

    4. Are you linking or embedding graphics in your app? Embedded graphics bloat your file and slow down startup. It's better to link them, especially if they're used more than once, and use a graphics program to make the files as small as possible.

    Bottom line, store only what must be shared on the server, nothing more. Access ain't great on networks.

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