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Thread: Pavlova

  1. #1
    2 Star Lounger
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    Pavlova

    I searched the Recipes section and was aghast to find there was no Pavlova recipe.
    Pavlova is an integral part of Kiwi life, emerging at almost any occasion. It is kind of like a giant meringue except that description does not do it justice. Because of the size it is soft and mushy inside while having that crunchy meringue-type exterior.

    You should be aware that certain Ockers (aka Australians) foolishly try to claim the Pavlova as theirs. This is in the same vein as other kiwi icons which they have misappropriated such as Phar Lap, Split Enz and Crowded House. <img src=/S/argue.gif border=0 alt=argue width=50 height=25>
    Anyway, here is but one of a gazillion "Pav" recipes from the "Shaky Isles"

    Pavlova
    Note: These recipes use NZ measurements. 1 c = 1 cup = 250 ml. 1 T = 1 tablespoon = 15 ml. 1 D = 2 teaspoons. 1 t = 1 teaspoon = 5ml.

    3 egg whites
    1 teaspoon vinegar
    3 tablespoons cold water
    1 teaspoon vanilla essence
    1 cup castor sugar
    3 teaspoons cornflour

    Beat egg whites until stiff, add cold water and beat again. Add castor sugar very gradually while still beating. Slow beater and add vinegar, vanilla and cornflour. Place on greased paper on greased tray and bake at 150 degrees C (300 degrees F) for 45 minutes, then leave to cool in the oven.
    Garnish with lots of whipped cream and kiwifruit, strawberries, peach slices, whatever. A combination of lemon curd covered with whipped cream is sensational!!

  2. #2
    Platinum Lounger
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    Re: Pavlova

    A pavlova well made is magnificent.

    But it can be very difficult to make properly.

    Despite a good recipe, it's very easy to make a disaster out of it.

    There is dispute as to whether it origiated in Australian or New Zealand. It's probably hard to know.

    However, the best fruit to put on a pavlova is kiwifruit.

    Which originated in China, and was known as "Chinese gooseberry". Until it was renamed as "kiwifruit" to reduce import tariffs.
    Subway Belconnen- home of the Signboard to make you smile. Get (almost) daily updates- follow SubwayBelconnen on Twitter.

  3. #3
    4 Star Lounger SteveH's Avatar
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    Re: Pavlova

    My mother's recipe for Pavlova usually had mandarin orange segments on a slightly coffee-flavoured cream on top. (Strawberries are good too).
    Apparently it is the vinegar which gives the lovely gooey, chewy centre to the meringue. Next family get-together I must request Pavlova again! <img src=/S/yum.gif border=0 alt=yum width=15 height=15>
    Steve H
    IT Lecturer/Access Developer
    O2K SR3/O2010; Win7Pro

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    Super Moderator WebGenii's Avatar
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    Re: Pavlova

    hungry now!
    [b]Catharine Richardson (WebGenii)
    WebGenii Home Page
    Moderator: Spreadsheets, Other MS Apps, Presentation Apps, Visual Basic for Apps, Windows Mobile

  5. #5
    2 Star Lounger
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    Re: Pavlova

    Ah yes, the dispute over its origins still rages. However, if you look at http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/story/0...338-953,00.html article the weight of evidence is currently in favour of the NZ claim.
    You are right that they can be difficult to make well, but there are some things one can do to improve the odds:
    - Use only fresh eggs at room temperature.
    - Do not use a fan-forced oven
    - Some people allow the pav to sit in the oven until the oven has cooled completely - this both allows the crust to develop fully and lessens the incidence of cracking
    I had a recipe years ago (now lost) which used a combination of caster sugar and ordinary sugar. The caster sugar was beaten in and "dissolved" while the normal sugar was added at the end of the mixing and only beaten lightly - this was supposed to aid in producing a thicker, crisper crust.
    Time to stop salivating and break out the egg beater!!

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