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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    BSOD (Windows XP)

    I am curious as to what exactly my BSOD means, and if it's the end of this drive, as I suspect.
    I get the stop message followed by 0x08E, and there are a couple others in parentheses followed by SYMTDI.SYS (I have no idea what this means, other than it's a system file, I'd guess) and another address with a bunch of other stuff. Not surprisingly, Microsoft's search was unhelpful, although I did finally figure out that this particular stop message is for KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED, whatever that means.
    I am just wondering if this means my heard drive is going on vacation, permanently. I have gotten this particular BSOD three or four times in the last week, and it's always after the computer has gone into sleep mode. I have changed nothing, but moved recently, and the first time I turned it on the fans made all kinds of racket.
    Any help forthcoming will be appreciated. In the interim, I shall start looking for a new hard drive (I have a Dell Dimension 4600 from 2004; what hard drive should I get?)

  2. #2
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    Re: BSOD (Windows XP)

    As Bug Check 0x8E: KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED says - this is a common error code. Software operating in kernel mode is at a very low level in the operating system where when anything goes wrong it usually results in a system crash (i.e. BSOD). SYMTDI.SYS is a Symantec device driver. See Symantec SYMTDI.SYS Device Driver Local Elevation of Privilege for a security issue with it. Is XP & your Symantec software up-to-date with patches? It is also possible you are have a RAM problem. See Windows XP crashed again [Archive] - Virtual Dr Forums-Computer Tech Support for more information.

    Joe
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  3. #3
    New Lounger
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    Re: BSOD (Windows XP)

    I am not sure about the Symantec stuff being up to date. I have SystemWorks 2006, and Firewall. Ever since I renewed via download, the firewall subscription is coming up as expired but the AntiVirus shows current. According to Symantec, it's a common issue with the 2006 product, but none of their suggestion as far as synchronizing the two actually worked.
    Two days ago, Symantec came up not working, and I was instructed to uninsytall and reinstall. I didn't since I can't find the disks, and the next day it was fine. I randomly get error messages about corrupt files, but they never seem to amount to much.
    These are reasons I wonder about the hard drive, but perhaps Symantec is the problem...?

  4. #4
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    Re: BSOD (Windows XP)

    Random errors about corrupt files should not be ignored. Have you run chkdsk? That should give you some idea about the disk drive status.

    Joe
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  5. #5
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    Re: BSOD (Windows XP)

    After running chkdsk, the computer went right to the desktop, so I am not sure if that's good or not. I would assume that if there was a problem in the disk, a message would pop up.
    However, when running the check, under the file system type, there was a notation: "The volume is dirty". That seems like a bad thing.

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    Re: BSOD (Windows XP)

    When you use the GUI, make sure "Automatically fix file system errors" and "Scan for and attempt recovery of bad sectors" are both checked. You will then have to re-boot to get chkdsk to run. Once it has run and after the system has booted you can use the Event Viewer to check the results.

    Joe
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  7. #7
    New Lounger
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    Re: BSOD (Windows XP)

    I am not sure what GUI is, or how to access Event Viewer, but I did check both boxes, as you suggested, and as it was outlined in Woody's book.
    As for the Symantec error: according to the link you left, supposedly running Live Update will fix that issue. But the synchronizing of the firewall and Systemworks is still not done. So it makes me wonder if Symantec is causing all the issues.

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    Re: BSOD (Windows XP)

    Sorry, for the jargon GUI = Graphical User Interface. If you ran chkdsk with both boxes checked on your C: drive, then chkdsk will not actually do anything until you re-boot your PC. To see the Event Viewer go to Start | Run and type in eventvwr.msc. Then click on "Application" in the left pane. Once the right pane is populated scan it for chkdsk.

    Joe
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  9. #9
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    Re: BSOD (Windows XP)

    All right. I did it that way. However, in the event viewer there was no listing for chkdsk, only winlogin, which had the check disk steps listed, but nothing came up about bad sectors, corrupt files or anything else. So can I assume it's not my hard drive? Also, is there a way to change kernel memory so it doesn't max out and crash the system?

  10. #10
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    Re: BSOD (Windows XP)

    The error message you got was KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED, this has nothing to do with memory.

    Most computer programs run in USER mode, this applies even to programs provided by Microsoft. Some programs have to run in KERNEL mode, as this gives access to parts of the hardware that are not normally accessible. Typical kernel mode programs include device drivers, firewalls and other very privileged code.

    A user mode program can generate exceptions, such as trying to access a bit of memory that they shouldn't, or dividing something by zero. The system has special software that handles these exceptions and returns an error to the user program. If a kernel mode program generates one of these exceptions then the system cannot handle them, so it does a BSOD. The kernel mode program is supposed to check everything carefully and not generate exceptions.

    The likely causes of this error are a software bug in some privileged software, or a hardware fault that corrupted some data. It is even possible that a stray cosmic ray changed a bit in memory and caused the error - this may sound improbable but it is why servers have error correcting memory.

    StuartR

  11. #11
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    Re: BSOD (Windows XP)

    Well, that helps a lot. It makes me think that is IS in fact something to do with my Symantec - Norton SystemWorks, I'd say - programs.
    I just got a new BSoD: 0x50 - PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA. According to thw book I have, this 'has numerous causes, including bad memory cards'. Is this the RAM? Or are there other memory cards of which I am unaware? I am just trying to see if this is related to my other BSoD, which would get me leaning more and more toward uninstalling the Symantec stuff, and getting a new program, whether 360 for this year or a McAfee product.

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    Re: BSOD (Windows XP)

    That is the RAM. Do you have multiple RAM modules? You could try Microsoft Online Crash Analysis - windiag.

    Joe
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  13. #13
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    Re: BSOD (Windows XP)

    If by modules you mean two different cards, then yes. One came with my computer and one I bought later. Could that also cause the kernel memory crash?

  14. #14
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    Re: BSOD (Windows XP)

    PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA is another similar type of issue to KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED.

    Here is an attempt to explain this one...
    <UL><LI>Programs store their code and data in memory.
    <LI>Sometimes there is not enough physical memory available, so the code and data are stored on disk instead, in an area called the pagefile.
    <LI>When the program tries to access this data, Windows detects the event, suspends the program for a moment, and feteches the data from disk.
    <LI>The program then resumes from the point it was suspended, using the data that is now in memory
    <LI>This sequence of events is called a "Page Fault", it is a perfectly normal thing and not really a "fault" at all
    <LI>Some data is supposed to be in memory all the time, and is not allowed to create page faults, for example
    <UL><LI>the code for the device driver that is needed to access the pagefile
    <LI>data that the operating system needs to find the disk drive
    <LI>code or data needed by the page fault software[/list]<LI>If a page fault happens when accessing this data then you get the PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA BSOD [/list]The most common cause of this is data corruption, causing the program to try and access an invalid memory address, but it can occasionally be caused by a bug in privileged software.

    I suspect you have a hardware fault, most probably in memory, CPU or (less probably) one of the other critical motherboard components.

    How often does your computer fail? You could try running with just one of your two memory sticks for a while to see if it still fails, and then try running with just the other one.

    StuartR

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    Re: BSOD (Windows XP)

    Did this problem start soon after you added the second RAM stick?

    Are you sure that the additional stick is the exact same kind of RAM and of the type recommended for your particular machine?
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