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  1. #1
    Star Lounger
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    Design question (2003)

    I am creating an Access database for a hospital to track the reasons and outcomes of a specific procedure done on patients with Atrial Fib.
    The procedure is the same on all patients - but the procedure is being done by two different types of doctors (Thoracic approach vs Electrophysiology approach).

    The two doctors are gathering some of the same information, and some different information on each approach.
    For example: Name, Date of birth, SSN, Type of Atrial Fib, Symptoms and History are the same on every patient.
    Thoracic approach has "Surgery Date" and some other fields that are not gathered for the EP approach.
    And, the EP approach collects "Procedure time" and some other fields that are not gathered for the Thoracic approach.

    So,
    for the sake of normalization - should I have one table that contains the like fields and two other tables that house the differences between each procedure approach ? If so - is that a one-to -one relationship? and would it add complexity to reporting.

    Or, should there be one table for each procedure approach?

    Thank you so much,
    Vicky

  2. #2
    Gold Lounger
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    Re: Design question (2003)

    Personally, I'd have one table with all the fields. During data entry you can make certain controls visible/invisible based on the approach.
    Mark Liquorman
    See my website for Tips & Downloads and for my Liquorman Utilities.

  3. #3
    4 Star Lounger SteveH's Avatar
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    Re: Design question (2003)

    A tabbed form may be a good way to go - it stops controls appearing/disappearing which can be disconcerting for a user. (Enabling/disabling controls is the preferred design paradigm as users learn where the controls are.)
    Steve H
    IT Lecturer/Access Developer
    O2K SR3/O2010; Win7Pro

  4. #4
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    Re: Design question (2003)

    Thank you both for your quick responses. I will play around with them both. I wanted to make sure the table design was correct.
    I have not enabled/disabled before - but they might prefer the tabs anyway.
    Vicky

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