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Thread: Swiss languages

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    Re: Wikis - Any recommendations

    In that case (and to keep all bases covered) Pardonnez mich.

    Alan

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    Re: Wikis - Any recommendations

    Since we're not in Scuttlebutt any more, I'll stop hijacking this thread...

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    Re: Wikis - Any recommendations

    Danke beaucoup.

    Alan

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    Re: Wikis - Any recommendations

    Even in the Swiss German part they avoid using the "ß" - It would be Strassen here.

    Alan - thanks. I've already decided I need a morning, or an afternoon to dedicate to this. Hopefully tomorrow! [Gulp, what have I got myself into smilie] <img src=/S/evilgrin.gif border=0 alt=evilgrin width=15 height=15>

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    Re: Wikis - Any recommendations

    <img src=/S/whisper.gif border=0 alt=whisper width=29 height=17>They say "merci" in the Swiss German part (which they DON'T do in Germany or Austria). So what your are looking for is;

    [i][b]Merci villmool

    .

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    Re: Wikis - Any recommendations

    OK, whatever he said. <img src=/S/igiveup.gif border=0 alt=igiveup width=31 height=23>

    Alan

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    Swiss languages

    This was originally part of the thread starting at <post:=755,419>post 755,419</post:>. I moved it to Scuttlebutt because it's off-topic

    Bowlie is in the Suisse Romande, the French-speaking part of Switzerland, so you're keeping him off the "rues". Straßen are on the other side of the Röstigraben.

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    Re: Wikis - Any recommendations

    Engraziel.

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    Re: Swiss languages

    OY! (Which is not Swiss) I've been un-hijacked! Does Chris know you can do this? <img src=/S/evilgrin.gif border=0 alt=evilgrin width=15 height=15>

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    Re: Wikis - Any recommendations

    Shouldn't that be merci viehlmohl, or, perhaps, donkey beaucoup <img src=/S/question.gif border=0 alt=question width=15 height=15> <img src=/S/smile.gif border=0 alt=smile width=15 height=15>
    Cheers, Claude.

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    Re: Wikis - Any recommendations

    I think that is one of a number of variations - as you know there are many Swiss German (or Schwyzertütsch, Schweizerdeutsch, Schwyzerdütsch or Schwiizertüütsch) dialects

    From Wiki:
    Swiss German is a regional or political umbrella term, not a linguistic unity. For all dialects, there are idioms spoken outside Switzerland that are more closely related to them than some Swiss German dialects. The main linguistic divisions within Swiss German are those of Low, High and Highest Alemannic. Low Alemannic is only spoken in the northernmost parts of Switzerland, in Basel and around Lake Constance. High Alemannic is spoken in most of the Swiss plateau, and is divided in an eastern and a western group. Highest Alemannic is spoken in the Alps.

    * Low Alemannic
    o Basel German in Basel (BS), closely related to Alsatian
    * High Alemannic
    o western
    + Bernese German, in the Swiss plateau parts of Bern (BE)
    + dialects of Solothurn (SO)
    + dialects of Aargau (AG)
    + dialects of Lucerne (LU)
    + dialects of Zug (ZG)
    o in a middle position of eastern and western is
    + Zürich German, in Zürich (ZH)
    o eastern
    + dialects of St. Gallen (SG)
    + dialects of Appenzell (AP)
    + dialects of Thurgau (TG)
    + dialects of Schaffhausen (SH)
    + dialects of parts of Graubünden (GR)
    * Highest Alemannic
    o dialects of the German-speaking parts of Fribourg (FR).
    o dialects of the Bernese Oberland (BE)
    o dialects of Unterwalden (UW) and Uri (UR)
    o dialects of Schwyz (SZ)
    o dialects of Glarus (GL)
    o Walliser German in parts of the Valais (VS)
    o Walser German: Via the medieval migration of the Walser, Highest Alemannic spread to pockets of what are now parts of northern Italy (P), the north west of Ticino (T), parts of Graubünden (GR), Liechtenstein and Vorarlberg.

    Each dialect is separable in numerous local sub-dialects, sometimes down to a resolution of individual villages. Speaking the dialect is an important part of regional, cantonal and national identity. In the more urban areas of the Swiss plateau, regional differences are fading due to increasing mobility, and a growing population of non-Alemannic descent.

    Despite the varied dialects, the Swiss can still understand one another (although on occasion just barely) but may particularly have trouble understanding Walliser dialects.


    Moi, je parle de la version romande de la Suisse allemande

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