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  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger
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    Hi -

    Why do some programs end up in Application Data? Example:C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\Malwarebytes

    (Windows XP)

    Thank you,
    Acer

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger
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    MalwareBytes stores some files in the All Users Application Data folder, but the program itself is installed in C:\Program Files\MalwareBytes unless you specify otherwise.

  3. #3
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    [quote name='HansV' post='761196' date='24-Feb-09 18:00']MalwareBytes stores some files in the All Users Application Data folder, but the program itself is installed in C:\Program Files\MalwareBytes unless you specify otherwise.[/quote]

    Thank you, Hans. Why do some programs have some files in the Application Data folder as well as Program Files folder? If answer is technical, don't waste your time....

    Acer

  4. #4
    Plutonium Lounger
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    In general, Application Data is for user-specific settings - each user has his/her own Application Data folder.

    Some applications store shared settings in C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data. I'm not sure what the reason for that is.

  5. #5
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    [quote name='acerfmayer' post='761199' date='24-Feb-09 17:05'][/quote]

    The Program Files folder is supposed to be used for code only. In newer Windows OSes (Vista & 7) by default the user can not write in the Program Files folder or any sub-folder under it.

    Some programs use the "all users" node so it does not make any difference what user is logged on to the machine. Otherwise, userB may not be able to access something required for a program installed by userA. Make sense?

    Joe
    Joe

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