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  1. #1
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    What's the best way to determine what individual components of a Word 2007 document are contributing to its file size? I have a 15,000+ KB Word document, and I am uncertain how it became so large, almost 3 times larger than an earlier draft of identical length (40 pages). There are about 30 figures, 26 of which are Excel charts and 4 of which are Word tables. The earlier draft, that was about 5,000+ KB, also had roughly this same number/proportion of charts and graphics. The final, 15000+ KB document has all changes accepted and no editorial comments or rev bars, so there are no residual charts or tables still there. Also, there are no JPG images beyond 3 very small images within 1 table. At a certain stage from one draft to another, the size almost tripled, and I have no clear sense of how or why. Any explanations as to why and advice on how to reduce the size will be welcome.

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Do you have versions turned on?

    A .docx (or .docm) file is actually a zip file, so if you temporarily change the extension to .zip, you can look at the components of the document.
    The main subfolder is named Word. This contains files such as styles.xml (the style definitions) and document.xml (the contents of the document).
    It has a subfolder named Media that contains the graphics as separate files.
    Don't forget to restore the Word extension when you're done!

  3. #3
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    I would be very wary of the Excel charts you have pasted into your document. If you do a straight copy/paste then the entire workbook can be pasted in (and you just see the selected part until you double click it to edit). This is a potential source of large file sizes and you might not want the Word readers to see all the other things that were contained in the Excel workbook.

    If you have 26 Excel graphics in the Word doc, you could have 26 copies of the workbook as well. If that workbook grew during the edits then any filesize increase would be magnified 26 times.
    Andrew Lockton, Chrysalis Design, Melbourne Australia

  4. #4
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    As per company policy, we must paste Excel charts into the Word document as Paste>Paste Special>Excel Chart, so to the best of my knowledge, I am only pasting each specific chart with each corresponding paste.

  5. #5
    Plutonium Lounger
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    If you paste a chart as an Excel object, the entire workbook is stored in your Word document, because you must be able to edit the chart and its source data later on. If you paste as a picture, only a non-editable graphic of the chart is stored.

  6. #6
    Bronze Lounger IanWilson's Avatar
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    [quote name='ben000' post='772155' date='24-Apr-2009 15:09']As per company policy, we must paste Excel charts into the Word document as Paste>Paste Special>Excel Chart, so to the best of my knowledge, I am only pasting each specific chart with each corresponding paste.[/quote]
    If you have to paste it that way, perhaps you could limit the damage by saving your workbook with as few sheets as possible to minimise the size?

    Ian

  7. #7
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    [quote name='HansV' post='772061' date='23-Apr-2009 22:26']Do you have versions turned on?

    A .docx (or .docm) file is actually a zip file, so if you temporarily change the extension to .zip, you can look at the components of the document.
    The main subfolder is named Word. This contains files such as styles.xml (the style definitions) and document.xml (the contents of the document).
    It has a subfolder named Media that contains the graphics as separate files.
    Don't forget to restore the Word extension when you're done![/quote]

    Could you tell me how I can change the extension to .zip in Vista? I don't see any options in the properties tab to change the type of file, and renaming the file by adding ".zip" to the end of the title doesn't change the file type. Thanks.

  8. #8
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Make sure that you display the extension for known file types. You should then be able to change the extension .zip to .docx in Windows Explorer.

  9. #9
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    Added the ability to list files by Type in Vista, but I don't see where I can actually change the file extension- right-clicking the document still brings up the same options in the properties tab.

    Thanks.

  10. #10
    Bronze Lounger IanWilson's Avatar
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    [quote name='ben000' post='773088' date='30-Apr-2009 16:30']I looked through the various properties options for the document and don't see an option to the display the extension for known file types. Can you explain how I adjust this setting?
    Thanks.[/quote]
    That is a setting for Windows as a whole, not just for the Word document. Open a folder, any folder, and go to Tools - Folder Options ... - View, and deselect the option to "hide file extensions for known file types". It's one of MS's worst decisions, and one that they never seem to correct, to have it set at that by default. It makes it so hard to see what a file really is, and can sometimes make a malicious file look benign.

    Ian

  11. #11
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    Ahh, thanks. I didn't have my settings properly configured...now I see the .docx after the file name.

  12. #12
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    So, thanks to your good advice, Ian, I now have the ZIP file open, and I am curious about the following:

    For each Excel chart I pasted into the Word document as an Excel chart, I see two "instances" of it within this ZIP file:

    The first here: Word>Media>as image 1-29 in mainly either .emf or .wmf format (enhanced meta file), and with approzimate sizes from about 261,000 to 498,000
    The second here: Word>Embeddings> as Excel worksheet 1-26 in .xlsx format, and with approximate sizes from about 509,000 to 767,000

    So it seems each chart impacts the overall Word file size in those two areas. Note that, per company policy, I have to Paste>Paste special>Excel file when pasting Excel charts into Word 2007 documents. When I do this, I seem to essentially be pasting in the entire Excel worksheet (or spreadsheet?) that each particular Excel chart is in, right? Most of the 26 or so Excel charts I pasted in this particular Word document came from the same spreadsheet, though within the spreadsheet there are numerous other charts in other worksheet tabs at the bottom toolbar that I am not using/inserting into the Word file. Do these unused/unpasted worksheets contribute to the overall memory size of both the .emf/.wmf and .xlsx files I listed above?

    My goal here is to still paste the necessary Excel charts into Word using the Paste special>Excel file method, but to make the process as streamlined as possible- preventing unneccessary charts and worksheets from inflating the overall Word 2007 document size. I suspect that it will be necessary to create more Excel spreadsheets for each project, such that a specific report (we often create several reports for one project) will draw on one smaller, report-specific (as opposed to project-specific) Excel spreadsheet out of several instead of one larger, project-encompassing spreadsheet with numerous worksheet tabs.

    Can folks weigh in on this issue, confirm my above hunch, and/or offer other advice?

    Thanks.

  13. #13
    Plutonium Lounger
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    I already answered one of your questions in post #5 higher up in this topic: yes, the entire workbook is stored in the document (as well as a picture of the chart).

    It would be better to paste as a picture, but your company policy forbids that. So you'll have to create small workbooks with only the minimum necessary data and one chart in each.

  14. #14
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    [quote name='ben000' post='773113' date='30-Apr-2009 10:07']For each Excel chart I pasted into the Word document as an Excel chart, I see two "instances" of it within this ZIP file:

    The first here: Word>Media>as image 1-29 in mainly either .emf or .wmf format (enhanced meta file), and with approzimate sizes from about 261,000 to 498,000
    The second here: Word>Embeddings> as Excel worksheet 1-26 in .xlsx format, and with approximate sizes from about 509,000 to 767,000[/quote]
    I think Word creates (and stores) the image to simplify display, otherwise it would have to actually run multiple instances of Excel in real time to display the document, which probably would not give acceptable performance. Therefore, I think you are stuck with having both an image and an XLS(x).

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