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  1. #1
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    One well-known UK seller of computing knick-knacks is advertising many/most of its USB Flash Drives as "ReadyBoost-enabled".

    I suspect this is mere advertising puffery - do you have to do anything to a UFD to enable it for ready-boost under Vista?

    (To anyone who asks, Why don't you try it?", I can report that I have an entirely Vista-free environment...)
    BATcher

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    5 Star Lounger PaulB's Avatar
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    [quote name='BATcher' post='778499' date='05-Jun-2009 12:22']I suspect this is mere advertising puffery - do you have to do anything to a UFD to enable it for ready-boost under Vista?[/quote]

    Not all UFDs qualify for Readyboost. From Windows Help:

    Some universal serial bus (USB) storage devices contain both slow and fast flash memory, and Windows can only use fast flash memory to speed up your computer. So if your device contains both slow and fast memory, keep in mind that you can only use the fast memory portion for this purpose.
    Regards,
    PaulB

  3. #3
    Uranium Lounger viking33's Avatar
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    [quote name='BATcher' post='778499' date='05-Jun-2009 12:22']One well-known UK seller of computing knick-knacks is advertising many/most of its USB Flash Drives as "ReadyBoost-enabled".

    I suspect this is mere advertising puffery - do you have to do anything to a UFD to enable it for ready-boost under Vista?

    (To anyone who asks, Why don't you try it?", I can report that I have an entirely Vista-free environment...)[/quote]
    It appears the RB is built into Vista and all the UFD has to do is meet minimum requirements for Vista to "enable" it. If it DOES meet specs then Vista will automatically use RB.
    -------------------------------------------
    An excerpt from an Extreme Tech article:


    The minimum requirements for a USB memory device to be ReadyBoost capable is 2.5MB/sec for 4K random access reads and 1.5MB/sec for 512K random writes—and that rate has to be achieved across the whole flash memory space. When you plug a USB memory device into the system, Vista actually does a performance check to see if the device meets the standard. Vista won't allow you to use a device it thinks will slow the system down. Note that USB hard drives won't work. Microsoft's general recommendation for maximum benefit from ReadyBoost is to match the capacity of the flash device to the size of your system's main memory. So if you have 2GB of system RAM, use a 2GB USB key. Note that some benefit is gained from using any flash device, and the capacities supported for ReadyBoost range from 256MB to 4GB
    BOB
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  4. #4
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    Thanks to you both! Most is now revealed, and the slogan should really read ReadyBoost Capable.
    BATcher

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  5. #5
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    Grant Gibson has been tracking this capability since it first came out, and specifically the hardware performance results users have reported. Mere speed is not the only criterion, as I personally blew a very fast and correspondingly expensive Kingston Data Traveller II (with Migo), which Kingston replaced, as it was under warranty. That may be exactly the reason that manufacturers themselves are making a distinction: the majority of USB drives are unsuitable, and those that are suitable can profit from advertising it, as they have been in short supply. If it doesn't say it's OK, don't assume it is.

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