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  1. #1
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    This is an unusual requirement, but the standard router uses WPA2 security, which is fine for modern equipment, but does not allow for the siutation where old and specialised equipment (in fact a Braille device) only uses WEP. This latter is used on an occasional basis.

    Would I be right in think ing that best (only?) way of providing internet access for WEP-only devices would be to use
    • a Wireless Access Point,
    • with a different network name
    • and using a different channel from the main router?
    I suspect that there would be probblems with using the same network name but a different channel!

    Thanks!
    BATcher

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    [quote name='BATcher' post='784462' date='14-Jul-2009 03:01']This is an unusual requirement, but the standard router uses WPA2 security, which is fine for modern equipment, but does not allow for the siutation where old and specialised equipment (in fact a Braille device) only uses WEP. This latter is used on an occasional basis.

    Would I be right in think ing that best (only?) way of providing internet access for WEP-only devices would be to use
    • a Wireless Access Point,
    • with a different network name
    • and using a different channel from the main router?
    I suspect that there would be probblems with using the same network name but a different channel!

    Thanks![/quote]
    From above I presume the device ONLY connects via Wireless ???

    If it has a USB port can it use Wireless-G USB Network Adapter ?

    Can you use a combination Router/WAP and hook WEP device directly into router ?
    Scott

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    Plutonium Lounger
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    I think you are correct. If you have the SAME network name on two access points then you must have the same encryption settings.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    Thanks, both! I have set up the WAP device as in my first post and am awaiting the results of a trial with the braille device (which is four years old, but was back-level even when new - it has a serial port, for example!). I have been able, with my laptop, to connect with either of the WPA2 router and the WEP WAP (acronym abuse here!).

    If this works, as a completely separate exercise, I will change the settings on the (homeplug) Wireless Access Point so that it uses WPA2, and the same network name / SSID as the main router, but broadcasts on a different channel from that which the router uses. This test would be similar to plugging in a "range extender', except that a different channel would be used. I believe Stuart suggested that this setup was possible in a post a few months ago.

    Which brings me to a final question: what would you expect to happen if two wireless devices were broadcasting on the same channel using the same network name and the same security mechanism (such as WPA2)? Chaos?!
    BATcher

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    [quote name='BATcher' post='784665' date='15-Jul-2009 09:28']Which brings me to a final question: what would you expect to happen if two wireless devices were broadcasting on the same channel using the same network name and the same security mechanism (such as WPA2)? Chaos?![/quote]
    The key issue here is physical separation. Imagine that the two devices are in the open air with no walls etc. They will each have a circle where they can be used. The area of overlap between those circles will suffer radio interference and poor quality. Now add the effect of walls and see how the circles change shape.

    In other words, Your Mileage May Vary. If the overlap is small enough it may work very well.

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    [quote name='StuartR' post='784686' date='15-Jul-2009 07:20']The key issue here is physical separation. Imagine that the two devices are in the open air with no walls etc. They will each have a circle where they can be used. The area of overlap between those circles will suffer radio interference and poor quality. Now add the effect of walls and see how the circles change shape.

    In other words, Your Mileage May Vary. If the overlap is small enough it may work very well.[/quote]
    Normally i would agree with you but I do have a question.

    PRESUMING your example is true with best case - both circles are touching the "ACCESS POINT" aka internet but do NOT touch each other. BATcher is trying to access the internet with 2 different devices at the same time.

    Would this not be the same as if I have 2 land line telephones with a single outgoing line and I want to make a call from upstairs while the kid makes a call from downstairs at the same time to different numbers ?

    Your above example would have 2 devices trying to access different website at the same time on the same "Telephone line" ?
    Scott

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    The "circles" I was thinking of are around each Wireless Access Point. These access points are probably in fixed positions and are each independently connected to the wired network. If these circles don't overlap then you won't have a problem. Of course they aren't really hard edged circles as the signal does not cut off sharply, but degrades with the square of the distance.

    If you have two laptops or other wireless devices both trying to access the Internet at once, via a single Wireless Access Point, then they will share the available bandwidth. See Carrier sense multiple access with collision avoidance for information about how this is done.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    [quote name='BATcher' post='784665' date='15-Jul-2009 09:28']If this works, as a completely separate exercise, I will change the settings on the (homeplug) Wireless Access Point so that it uses WPA2, and the same network name / SSID as the main router, but broadcasts on a different channel from that which the router uses. This test would be similar to plugging in a "range extender', except that a different channel would be used. I believe Stuart suggested that this setup was possible in a post a few months ago.[/quote]
    Just to tidy up this thread:
    The braille WEP device worked first time on the WEP-configured wireless access point homeplug - when the correct password was typed in - so happiness occurred!

    When the WPA2-configured router and the WPA2 (reconfigured) homeplug wireless access point were both set to the same network name/SSID, my laptop could only see one network whereas my ZyXEL "wifi finder" device found two identically-named wireless devices, broadcasting on different channels. So in this environment the sensible answer would be to use a wireless network "range extender", to rebroadcast the faint signal more strongly, for local devices.

    I think that's enough wireless fun for the moment!
    BATcher

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  9. #9
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    [quote name='StuartR' post='784865' date='16-Jul-2009 01:37']The "circles" I was thinking of are around each Wireless Access Point. These access points are probably in fixed positions and are each independently connected to the wired network. If these circles don't overlap then you won't have a problem. Of course they aren't really hard edged circles as the signal does not cut off sharply, but degrades with the square of the distance.

    If you have two laptops or other wireless devices both trying to access the Internet at once, via a single Wireless Access Point, then they will share the available bandwidth. See Carrier sense multiple access with collision avoidance for information about how this is done.[/quote]
    I THOUGHT MY HOMEWORK WAS DONE BEFORE MY VACATION

    Seriously - thanks for the information - I am starting to review it - still having a slight problem warping (er wrapping) my head around it - but I will get there.
    Scott

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