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  1. #1
    Gold Lounger
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    Hello all,
    When you run "Recuva" http://www.recuva.com/download you get a list or "recoverable & unrecoverable" filenames etc. Question: when you remove or delete files, why are they still there? How can you remove these permanently, or is this not possible? I have JV-16 power tools, and under "Privacy Tools" there is a disk or file wiper, tried to run it and after 5hrs i gave up. Any thoughts? Regards
    PlainFred

    None are so hopelessly enslaved as those who falsely believe they are free (J. W. Von Goethe)

  2. #2
    Uranium Lounger viking33's Avatar
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    [quote name='Just Plain Fred' post='785649' date='21-Jul-2009 15:48']Hello all,
    When you run "Recuva" http://www.recuva.com/download you get a list or "recoverable & unrecoverable" filenames etc. Question: when you remove or delete files, why are they still there? How can you remove these permanently, or is this not possible? I have JV-16 power tools, and under "Privacy Tools" there is a disk or file wiper, tried to run it and after 5hrs i gave up. Any thoughts? Regards[/quote]
    Fred,
    What kind of files are you trying to get rid of?
    Is this from within the Recuva program itself?
    BOB
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  3. #3
    Plutonium Lounger
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    A file on a disk is not a simple single thing. There will be an index entry in the MFT (Master File Table) that contains the file name and pointers to the data, and then lots of disk sectors that contain your file. When you delete the file the software simply marks the index entry as available, and updates its free space map to show that all the bits of the disk that used to contain your file are now free. This space can then be used for other files.

    The Index entry still has all the original information, including the pointers to where the file used to be, and software that undeletes files just needs to clear the bit that shows this is an unused entry and then update the free space map to show that the file data is no longer free space. This will only work if another file has not reused any of the disk space.

    If you want to read more about how NTFS stores data on disks then try this article.

  4. #4
    Gold Lounger
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    [quote name='viking33' post='785652' date='21-Jul-2009 16:15']Fred,
    What kind of files are you trying to get rid of?
    Is this from within the Recuva program itself?[/quote]
    Hello Bob,
    Thanks again for your help. "Recuva" sees the files that have been deleted.Removed programs, temp files etc.There is nothing specific that i was trying to get rid of, just was surprised at the amount of "stuff" left on my "C" drive. Most of which
    i have no clue as to what the files are or how they got there. Try running "Recuva" on your "C" drive you might be astonished at what you find! I think that some of the "stuff" are leftovers from running "Revo uninstaller" in the "junk file finder mode" as it moves things to the recycle bin. Just want to know how to purge this from my hard drive!? Regards
    PlainFred

    None are so hopelessly enslaved as those who falsely believe they are free (J. W. Von Goethe)

  5. #5
    Gold Lounger
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    [quote name='StuartR' post='785662' date='21-Jul-2009 17:21']A file on a disk is not a simple single thing. There will be an index entry in the MFT (Master File Table) that contains the file name and pointers to the data, and then lots of disk sectors that contain your file. When you delete the file the software simply marks the index entry as available, and updates its free space map to show that all the bits of the disk that used to contain your file are now free. This space can then be used for other files.

    The Index entry still has all the original information, including the pointers to where the file used to be, and software that undeletes files just needs to clear the bit that shows this is an unused entry and then update the free space map to show that the file data is no longer free space. This will only work if another file has not reused any of the disk space.

    If you want to read more about how NTFS stores data on disks then try this article.[/quote]
    StuartR,
    Hello and thank you for the link.I have started to read through the information (quite extensive) as i did not realize how much is involved in "deleting something" I think that i will give JV-16 file wiper another try, after contacting their help desk.I'll post back with my findings. Regards
    PlainFred

    None are so hopelessly enslaved as those who falsely believe they are free (J. W. Von Goethe)

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    [quote name='Just Plain Fred' post='785732' date='22-Jul-2009 07:19']I have started to read through the information (quite extensive) as i did not realize how much is involved in "deleting something" I think that i will give JV-16 file wiper another try, after contacting their help desk.I'll post back with my findings.[/quote]

    It is up to you but once past learning about file deletion the acutal process seems to me to be a waste of time and energy. There are only a few circumstances when spending the extra time to scrub the drive is really warranted - required by corporate policy, personal paranoia about losing control of your PC, or disposal of an old hard drive.

    Joe
    Joe

  7. #7
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    [quote name='joeperez' post='785758' date='22-Jul-2009 10:29']It is up to you but once past learning about file deletion the acutal process seems to me to be a waste of time and energy. There are only a few circumstances when spending the extra time to scrub the drive is really warranted - required by corporate policy, personal paranoia about losing control of your PC, or disposal of an old hard drive.

    Joe[/quote]
    Joe,
    Hello again . Well "personal paranoia" is something that im well familiar with, but just trying to learn about this "PC" thing.Thanks for the advice. Regards
    PlainFred

    None are so hopelessly enslaved as those who falsely believe they are free (J. W. Von Goethe)

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