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  1. #1
    Platinum Lounger
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    So I'm told by a recent visitor to Newfoundland that a 50/50 mixture of boiled potatoes and beetroot is excellent, mashed together.
    I have decided to try it for dinner tomorrow night.

    The thought crossed my mind:
    Our ancestors, as have I, bottled carrots, string beans, beetroot etc but rarely do I hear of bottled potatoes, if ever, and never of bottled mashed potatoes.
    Back in the good-old-days potatoes were probably stored in root cellars, but I don't have a root cellar in my apartment.

    A quick web search turns up none of the usual cautionary warnings, and so I wonder if any loungers can think up a reason for NOT bottling mashed potatoes.

    I know the bit about green skins and oxalic acid, and I know to check for preserve-jars-demonstrating-pressure.

    I figure on making a small batch, say four 1/4 pint jars, and seeing what happens.

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger
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    I suspect that the starch and water in mashed potatoes would start to separate fairly soon, unless you added lots of stabilizers...

  3. #3
    Uranium Lounger
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    From here....
    "Potatoes may not be canned mashed. You may can them cubed, as done in
    this recipe. Upon opening, reheat in the canning water, drain off the water
    and mash adding the desired amount of butter, cream or milk and pepper.

    Potatoes should be peeled and have the eyes removed for canning. If you
    put them in water with a little ascorbic acid after peeling, it will prevent
    discoloration."

    Another thing to consider is that mashed potatoes contain dairy products (milk & butter) and as such should not be stored more than 3-4 days. They can be frozen, but that would most likely affect the texture when thawed.

    Are you trying to save work, time or money here Chris ??? Potatoes are inexpensive and mashed potatoes are simple enough to whip up. I'm not sure I follow your rational for doing this, but that's why there is chocolate and strawberry.
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  4. #4
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    [quote name='HansV' post='788631' date='12-Aug-2009 11:45']... start to separate fairly soon ...[/quote]
    Thanks, Hans, and yes.
    That's what happens, I suppose, when i try to freeze/thaw potato cakes.

  5. #5
    Platinum Lounger
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    [quote name='DocWatson' post='788672' date='12-Aug-2009 14:20']here[/quote]
    Doc - a humDINGer of a site, thanks for the url (wanders off to read a bit more ...)


    Are you trying to save work, time or money here Chris ???
    Neither, really. And yes, potatoes are cheap, even at Bruno's (across the street) prices.

    It is tied more into not wanting to waste at some times.

    Example: My lodger bought a bag of potatoes the same day as did I. (echoes of Cool Hand Luke. We can't eat potatoes day in day out, and I'd hat to see them sprout/go mouldy.
    Noone (geographically) near me is interested in an extra 7KG of potatoes - what if I could preserve them ...?

    Tossing 7KG into the vermicomposter will make the worms happy, but I'd rather have an option to digest them.

    It seemed that bottling/canning would a good way to hang on to them, and they could then be used
    (a) in a potato salad
    ( mashed
    potato cakes
    and so on.

    I suppose in the end "waste" means I'm trying to avoid loss of time and/or money, but factoring in the preparation and bottling time, electricty etc. I'm not going to save much.

    It comes down to a psychological thing, I suppose, hanging on to whatever food I've got until I can eat it.

  6. #6
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    Most potatoes are good keepers as long as they are stored in a "DARK, COOL" place. The frig is to cool of a place.

    When I was a lot younger, in the kitchen, we had two BIG drawers, one would hold 50 pound bag of flour and the other 50 pound bag of potatoes. We had no problem of losing to many of the potatoes.

    By the way, we also kept the onions in the same drawer as the potatoes, and they kept fresh also.

    Now running HP Pavilion a6528p, with Win7 64 Bit OS.

  7. #7
    Uranium Lounger
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    [quote name='chrisgreaves' post='789243' date='16-Aug-2009 10:41']It is tied more into not wanting to waste at some times.

    Example: My lodger bought a bag of potatoes the same day as did I. ......... We can't eat potatoes day in day out, and I'd hat to see them sprout/go mouldy.
    No one (geographically) near me is interested in an extra 7KG of potatoes - what if I could preserve them ...?

    Tossing 7KG into the vermicomposter will make the worms happy, but I'd rather have an option to digest them.

    I suppose in the end "waste" means I'm trying to avoid loss of time and/or money, but factoring in the preparation and bottling time, electricty etc. I'm not going to save much.

    It comes down to a psychological thing, I suppose, hanging on to whatever food I've got until I can eat it.[/quote]

    Have you considered creating a Root Cellar in your apartment or perhaps initiating a "community" root cellar in a nearby basement ??
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  8. #8
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    [quote name='DocWatson' post='789251' date='16-Aug-2009 12:49']Have you considered creating a Root Cellar in your apartment ... ??[/quote]

    Not until three minutes ago (grin!).
    Good point. And Good Links, thanks.
    While I'm not in the business in stroing the harvest of a ten-acre plot to feed my family over winter, I *do* have a bag of peat moss on the balcony.
    The next time I have too many potatoes I'll try storing some in moist peat moss(1); my coolest spot is probably under the kitchen sink.
    If a second bag of potatoes can keep for two months while I eat my way through the first, I will have achieved my goal!

    (1) I suppose without the peat moss I'd have resorted to shredded paper.

  9. #9
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    [quote name='DaveA' post='789247' date='16-Aug-2009 10:55']... kept the onions ...[/quote]
    TaDa!
    What was I thinking of?
    This triggered memories of Shepherd's Pie.
    Minced meat with mashed potatoes atop, pressed into foil tins and stored in the freezer.
    I've done that for years.
    Obviously mashed potato CAN be frozen and survive.
    It just needs to be mixed with cooked onion and some ground beef layered below.

  10. #10
    Platinum Lounger
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    "Potatoes may not be canned mashed. You may can them cubed, ...
    I made a batch of about a dozen cup-sized jars on Aug 26 and have been opening (and eating!) one every three days, on the grounds that if there's anything wonky, I'll get a mild dose before it really takes hold.
    (I know, I know; my slogan is "If in doubt, throw it out")
    Each jar, as opened, smells fresh and sweet, as boiled potatoes do.

    I've been using them simply for (1) potato cakes and (2) hash browns

    A bonus, for me, is that when I do decide to include potato in my meal, I'm getting a fixed measured portion, important for my diet, rather than consuming the largest potato that comes to hand.

  11. #11
    4 Star Lounger
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    Chris,

    How did you can them? Not that I have a pressing need to know just now, but it could be important future information.

    Johanna

  12. #12
    Uranium Lounger
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    [quote name='johbot' post='793448' date='15-Sep-2009 18:36']Chris,

    How did you can them? Not that I have a pressing need to know just now, but it could be important future information.

    Johanna[/quote]
    From the description, it sounds like he is cutting them up in chunks and freezing them. He may be sealing the jars, but it doesn't sound like it.
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  13. #13
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    JB> How did you can them?
    I chopped the raw potato into thumb-sized chunks, firmed them into the cup-sized jars, added a soupcon of salt and topped up with water.
    Into the sterilizer dixie and brought to and kept at the boil for a couple of hours.
    I'm non too scientific with the timing, and generally leave the apartment keys on the stove when I'm preserving to make sure I turn off the boiler before I go out.

    JB>but it could be important future information
    That reminds me of Jack Nicholson's line from As Good As It Gets: "Not until NOW!"
    Are you preparing for eventualities such as "Well, we've not heard from him for some time, do you suppose he's eaten some of those potatoes and they hav
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #14
    Platinum Lounger
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    [quote name='DocWatson' post='793468' date='15-Sep-2009 20:36']From the description, it sounds like he is cutting them up in chunks and freezing them. He may be sealing the jars, but it doesn't sound like it.[/quote]
    But please see above.
    Just chop/dice, raw into jars, bring to boil.

    That first batch is finished, and very convenient it was too.
    I liked ("diet") that I was consuming a fixed-sized portion of potatoes, and I liked that they were pre-cooked and ready to mix-n'mash, to coin a phrase.

  15. #15
    Uranium Lounger
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    I'm glad to see that you were actually canning them as if you were going to put them up for the winter as one would with other fruits and veggies. Makes the whole project much less risky and has the added benefit of giving you matched portions that are cooked and ready to prepare as you like.

    I've been using a vacuum sealer of late to store cookies, chips and such in mason jars. They will literally stay fresh for a month or more after opening the package. The vacuum sealer also is useful for storing meats and fish in the freezer to extend the freezer life of the food. I will buy 2 lbs of frozen shrimp, deveined/peel on and remove them from the bag they come in and place them in 2 1 quart mason jars and vacuum seal. They will stay in the freezer for months with no freezer burn and no ill effects. I make up batches of spagetti sauce and freeze it in vacuum sealed, portion size jars that can be kept for a year and be as good as the day it was made.

    I also buy fresh fruit and wash, prep and dry it before vacume sealing it in mason jars and freezing. Blueberries, raspberrys, strawberries, bananas all work out well and I buy chunked, frozen mango & papaya and seal that in jars as soon as I get it home. They all make delicious and healthy deserts or snacks just as they are out of the freezer or toppings for ice cream and such (not what I use them most for though). My primary use is to make smoothies. Using a frozen banana as a base, I add one or more other frozen fruits to a blender, some vanilla yogurt and some Simply Orange orange juice or an orange/mango or orange/pineapple blend from Simply Orange and blend until smooth. An excellent breakfast !!
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