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  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
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    Ok I've never really understood my Toshiba laptop with Vista. It came new with ony the one HDD of 160GB fitted and was split into 2 partitions? the C drive where everything seems to sit i.e. documents prog files etc. and a E drive for data, which never gets used. The C drive is beginning to fill up now and I want to know if I can do away with the E drive safely and extend the C drive to use up this capacity? Why did Toshiba make 2 partitions in the first place when nothing gets saved to the E drive. hopefully the attatched pic will give you an idea of what I'm talking about?
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  2. #2
    Uranium Lounger
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    They seem to have set aside a partition to store data on. You can setup your My Documents folder to be on the E partition and setup some, if not all, your individual programs to store their data there as well.

    This strategy facilitates the user's ability to blow away their OS & program installations and reinstall without having to backup critical data. This is often done for corporate systems so the IT department can restore a standard image without being concerned with the system data being lost. It is also useful because it helps keep your primary partition with the OS from being slowed down because of data clutter and fragmentation.
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  3. #3
    3 Star Lounger
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    Thanks. A quick read of your link and subsequent comments seems a bit confusing, so will delve a bit deeper and take my time reading this properley latter on today.

  4. #4
    Plutonium Lounger
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    [quote name='jaystarter1' post='789479' date='18-Aug-2009 09:04']Thanks. A quick read of your link and subsequent comments seems a bit confusing, so will delve a bit deeper and take my time reading this properley latter on today.[/quote]
    I only keep the operating system and applications on my C drive. All of my data is somewhere different, either on a different disk or on my network.

    If I have a problem then I can restore a backup of the C drive, or I can completely reinstall Windows, without affecting my data.

  5. #5
    5 Star Lounger PaulB's Avatar
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    [quote name='StuartR' post='789483' date='18-Aug-2009 04:58']I only keep the operating system and applications on my C drive. All of my data is somewhere different, either on a different disk or on my network.

    If I have a problem then I can restore a backup of the C drive, or I can completely reinstall Windows, without affecting my data.[/quote]

    In the scenario you describe, how do you deal with the "AppData" folders? These are system folders that are not readily moved off the C drive and contain mostly settings and application data that can be very volatile and are neither purely system nor purely data.

    Ideally these should be on a different drive, but MS does not provide a means to move them. If I were to lose my C drive, it seems to me that restoring it with a backup that is even only a few hours old could result in a significant loss of data stored in AppData.
    Regards,
    PaulB

  6. #6
    Plutonium Lounger
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    [quote name='PaulB' post='789664' date='19-Aug-2009 02:02']In the scenario you describe, how do you deal with the "AppData" folders?
    ...[/quote]
    Things that I know about, I deal with on a one off basis, for example:
    • Whenever I edit my Outlook signatures I copy the files from %appdata%\Microsoft\Signatures to a location on my data disk
    • I store Word templates in the Workgroup templates folder, which points to my data disk, and not in the user templates folder
    • When I create Outlook data files I store them on my data disk, not in the default location
    Other than that I accept that restoring to last night's backup may lose some information, but this has never caused me problems in the past. What specific volatile data are you thinking of?

  7. #7
    5 Star Lounger PaulB's Avatar
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    [quote name='StuartR' post='789695' date='19-Aug-2009 03:04']Things that I know about, I deal with on a one off basis, for example:
    • Whenever I edit my Outlook signatures I copy the files from %appdata%\Microsoft\Signatures to a location on my data disk
    • I store Word templates in the Workgroup templates folder, which points to my data disk, and not in the user templates folder
    • When I create Outlook data files I store them on my data disk, not in the default location
    Other than that I accept that restoring to last night's backup may lose some information, but this has never caused me problems in the past. What specific volatile data are you thinking of?[/quote]
    Perhaps 'volatile' may have been overstating it, and I while I had nothing specific in mind, there is the data you mention along with such things as my Thunderbird mail files and settings, Firefox settings and, yes, even my last saved session of Hearts.

    As you say though, these are things that you know about. What about the things that you, I and 98% of Windows users are unaware of? I don't understand why MS doesn't make it easy to truly separate system stuff from user settings and data.
    Regards,
    PaulB

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