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  1. #1
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    The file server in question runs Windows Server 2003 SP2 (but that may be irrelevant). It also runs DHCP, and its own address is 'fixed' at 192.168.0.2. It hands out addresses to the client PCs starting at 192.168.0.100.

    Usually when PCs PING FILESERVER they get its IP address back as 192.168.0.2. No surprise there.

    BUT if a PC is left powered on while the file server is rebooted, and if after the file server comes up the PC PINGs FILESERVER again, it gets returned an address like 192.168.0.129 rather than the correct 192.168.0.2.

    Furthermore, if someone logs on (at another PC which was previously hibernating, say) their Logon Script does not run and they don't get assigned any network drives or printers.

    The bypass is to now reboot any PC which was still powered up at the time the server was rebooted, then everything is fine again.

    Is there any explanation why this happens, and any easy way of overcoming the problem? I suspect this began to happen when some devious network reconfiguration (involving moving a second server from its own subnet to the "0" subnet) was performed, which was done by Someone Who Understands These Things, and certainly not me!

    Hope that gives enough detail...

    Thanks!
    BATcher

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  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Where is your DNS Server? Can you check how the DNS and DHCP servers communicate with each other.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    [quote name='StuartR' post='789841' date='19-Aug-2009 23:01']Where is your DNS Server? Can you check how the DNS and DHCP servers communicate with each other.[/quote]
    It's the same FILESERVER! You'll have to explain your final sentence, if it still applies...
    BATcher

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    [quote name='BATcher' post='789882' date='20-Aug-2009 06:01']It's the same FILESERVER! You'll have to explain your final sentence, if it still applies...[/quote]
    It probably doesn't apply if they are the same server!

    Please look on one of the problem PCs and check that it is using the correct DNS server, and then use NSLOOKUP to check what it thinks the IP Address of FILESERVER is.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    [quote name='StuartR' post='789885' date='20-Aug-2009 06:40']It probably doesn't apply if they are the same server!
    Please look on one of the problem PCs and check that it is using the correct DNS server, and then use NSLOOKUP to check what it thinks the IP Address of FILESERVER is.[/quote]
    On my PC at present, I get:
    Code:
    IPCONFIG /ALL
    Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1
    DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.2
    DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.2
    
    NSLOOKUP
    > *** Can't find server name for address 192.168.0.2: Non-existent domain
    *** Default servers are not available
    Default Server:  UnKnown
    Address:  192.168.0.2
    
    NSLOOKUP FILESERVER01
    *** Can't find server name for address 192.168.0.2: Non-existent domain
    *** Default servers are not available
    Server:  UnKnown
    Address:  192.168.0.2
    Name:	fileserver01.xxxxxxxx.COM
    Address:  192.168.0.2
    but since I never use NSLOOKUP, I don't know what those error messages imply...
    BATcher

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  6. #6
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    I think those error messages mean that your reverse lookup zone is not configured correctly, so the client can't translate an IP address to a hostname.

  7. #7
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    [quote name='StuartR' post='789900' date='20-Aug-2009 09:36']I think those error messages mean that your reverse lookup zone is not configured correctly, so the client can't translate an IP address to a hostname.[/quote]
    OK, thanks - I will throw this at our Technical Supporters...
    BATcher

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    [quote name='BATcher' post='789905' date='20-Aug-2009 10:01']OK, thanks - I will throw this at our Technical Supporters...[/quote]
    I'm not sure this explains your original problem, but it's certainly worth fixing.

    Meanwhile please let us see the NSLOOKUP output from a PC when it has the problem.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    [quote name='StuartR' post='789915' date='20-Aug-2009 11:08']Meanwhile please let us see the NSLOOKUP output from a PC when it has the problem.[/quote]
    Have to reboot the server for this! (Monday morning, so good to me...)
    BATcher

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    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    [quote name='BATcher' post='789927' date='20-Aug-2009 12:47']Have to reboot the server for this! (Monday morning, so good to me...)[/quote]
    Ok, so it was Tuesday.

    And no sooner do you try to demonstrate the problem and collect more data, than it doesn't appear! After the server reboot, with three workstations active and one with me logged on, before and after the reboot, there were no problems. Maybe that's because the 'before' and 'after' DHCP Address Leases details from the server are identical?

    Wonder whether I should run DHCP on the router rather than on the server...

    Ho-hum.
    BATcher

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  11. #11
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    [quote name='BATcher' post='790571' date='25-Aug-2009 07:35'][/quote]
    I am getting some to-me-unbelievable opinions on this DHCP saga, namely:
    • if the server hands out DHCP addresses, then any active PCs who get their IP addresses from DHCP should be rebooted if the server itself is rebooted.
    • if the router hands out DHCP addresses, then any active PCs who get their IP addresses from DHCP should be rebooted if the router itself is rebooted.
    The reason I don't believe this is that, in my experience, rebooting PCs has never been necessary in either of these circumstances.

    Any comments from people who know more about networking that I do, please?
    BATcher

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  12. #12
    Plutonium Lounger Leif's Avatar
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    [quote name='BATcher' post='790721' date='26-Aug-2009 12:16']Any comments from people who know more about networking that I do, please?[/quote]
    As someone who doesn't use DHCP, the idea that a pc needs to reboot (i.e. renew it's address) does make sense and without greater knowledge is probably what I would expect. Or does the router/server log the IP addresses so that after a reboot, you would expect it to pick up from where it left off?

    Otherwise, I have a recollection of reading somewhere that a DHCP server can be set up to allocate permanent IP addresses, or addresses 'on the fly'. If this is in fact true, could this make a difference it your situation?

    **I appreciate you were probably wanting a response from someone with DHCP experience, but unless you list exactly what you know, I don't know if I know more than you. (I doubt it, though!)

  13. #13
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    [quote name='Leif' post='790725' date='26-Aug-2009 12:37']As someone who doesn't use DHCP, the idea that a pc needs to reboot (i.e. renew it's address) does make sense and without greater knowledge is probably what I would expect. Or does the router/server log the IP addresses so that after a reboot, you would expect it to pick up from where it left off?

    Otherwise, I have a recollection of reading somewhere that a DHCP server can be set up to allocate permanent IP addresses, or addresses 'on the fly'. If this is in fact true, could this make a difference it your situation?

    **I appreciate you were probably wanting a response from someone with DHCP experience, but unless you list exactly what you know, I don't know if I know more than you. (I doubt it, though!)[/quote]
    Well, my understanding that the DHCP lease is given out for a particular length of time, so this is presumably stored in the server across reboots, and the same IP address would be given out to a PC that it had before the server reboot. The only time I could see there could be a problem would be if a new lease has to be granted to a PC because the old lease had expired during the reboot period (by unhappy chance). But what do I know?

    But since the problem relates to how the PCs see (or don't see!) the server, it is more to do with file handles?
    And If it were the router's DHCP that was handing out IP addresses, perhaps the problem would not occur?
    BATcher

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    [quote name='BATcher' post='790731' date='26-Aug-2009 06:57']Well, my understanding that the DHCP lease is given out for a particular length of time, so this is presumably stored in the server across reboots, and the same IP address would be given out to a PC that it had before the server reboot. The only time I could see there could be a problem would be if a new lease has to be granted to a PC because the old lease had expired during the reboot period (by unhappy chance). But what do I know?

    But since the problem relates to how the PCs see (or don't see!) the server, it is more to do with file handles?
    And If it were the router's DHCP that was handing out IP addresses, perhaps the problem would not occur?[/quote]

    We use DHCP from a Win 2003 SP2 sever and I have never had to re-boot PCs when the server is re-booted.

    Joe
    Joe

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    [quote name='BATcher' post='790571' date='25-Aug-2009 07:35']I am getting some to-me-unbelievable opinions on this DHCP saga, namely:
    • if the server hands out DHCP addresses, then any active PCs who get their IP addresses from DHCP should be rebooted if the server itself is rebooted.
    • if the router hands out DHCP addresses, then any active PCs who get their IP addresses from DHCP should be rebooted if the router itself is rebooted.
    The reason I don't believe this is that, in my experience, rebooting PCs has never been necessary in either of these circumstances.

    Any comments from people who know more about networking that I do, please?[/quote]
    I think that this is complete nonsense, but I guess there may be some poorly designed DHCP servers that can't remember what leases they have given out. EVEN if this is true you can correct it by issuing the command IPCONFIG / RENEW on each of the PCs that got an IP address from the problem DHCP server.

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