Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 17
  1. #1
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Cheshire, England
    Posts
    24
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Have recently moved to Word 2007 and can say I am finding it hard to get to grips with.

    I have created a document and recorded some very basic macros (e.g. for finding and removing hidden text) and saved the macro within my document. I put my macro on to my quick access toolbar.

    A colleague wants to use my document and macro himself. I sent him the document but he doesn't see any buttons I set up although the macros can be found and run via Developer ribbon.

    Question - can you share a document with macros and buttons so that the recipient sees the buttons?

    Question - can you create a personal toolbar to store your macros on or do they always have to go on the quick access?

    Question - what happens if you create macros in a template (rather than document) and want to put them on a toolbar for sharing - do I as the developer, have to put them on my quick access? Where would another user of the template find the macros, in their quick access or under add-ins?

    Sorry if these seem straight forward questions to some but this is doing my head in right now and our office support haven't got a clue.

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    84,353
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 29 Times in 29 Posts
    You can store custom toolbars in an add-in (using Word 2003!), they will then be available in Word 2007. See Toolbars and Word 2007.

    You may want to learn how to customize the ribbon, but unfortunately that is not as intuitive as customizing toolbars.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Silicon Valley, USA
    Posts
    23,112
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 93 Times in 89 Posts
    Office 2003 (and earlier) allowed you to dynamically add toolbars when a template was opened, using the CommandBars family of objects. If you run the same code in Outlook 2007, the toolbar should appear on the Ribbon's Add-Ins tab. I have had problems with doubling and tripling the toolbars, perhaps because I was not setting the "temporary" property. In any event, if you don't have Word 2003 readily available for building and tweaking your template, you could try creating the toolbar in code.

  4. #4
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Northridge, California, USA
    Posts
    230
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
    I think you will have to add the buttons for the macros to each user's Quick Access Toolbar, although another possibility -- if the users haven't customized their QAT already -- is to copy your QAT file (called Word.qat) to other people's machines. In Windows XP, the Word.qat file is stored in C:\Documents and Settings\<User Name>\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\OFFICE. If you think you might want to restore a user's customized QAT at some point, rename his or her Word.qat file rather than deleting it before you copy your Word.qat file to that person's machine.

    One very cool thing you can do is right-click the "Macros" button on the Developer tab (or on the View tab), then click "Add to Quick Access Toolbar." That puts an icon for the Macros dialog on the QAT so that it is available regardless of which tab of the Ribbon is at the forefront. It's not quite the same as having icons for each individual macro, but in a way it's even more efficient, particularly if you create lots of macros (and given the fact that the QAT doesn't expand beyond a single row).

    If you like, you can copy the macros from your document to each user's normal.dotm template. (Macros in the normal.dotm template are available globally.) You can use the Organizer to do so. With the document containing the macros on the screen, open the Macros dialog and click the Organizer button. Typically the Organizer will open with the current document appearing on the left and the normal.dotm appearing on the right. Click the Macro Projects tab if it isn't already at the forefront, then click the macro project in the document and click the "Copy" button. Now the macro project should appear in the box for the normal.dotm, too. Finally, click the Close button.

    As you probably know, the macros displayed when a user opens the Macros dialog depends on what is showing in the "Macros in" drop-down about 2/3 of the way down the dialog. Normally that drop-down shows "All active templates and documents," but if a user has manually changed that, some macros might not appear in the list.

    Jan
    Author, Formatting Legal Documents With Microsoft Word 2016,
    Formatting Legal Documents With Microsoft Word 2010​,
    and Formatting Legal Documents With Microsoft Office Word 2007

    For Word and WordPerfect tips, visit my blog at http://compusavvy.wordpress.com

  5. #5
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    2,970
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 29 Times in 27 Posts
    [quote name='jayce' post='789925' date='20-Aug-2009 07:40']Have recently moved to Word 2007 and can say I am finding it hard to get to grips with.

    I have created a document and recorded some very basic macros (e.g. for finding and removing hidden text) and saved the macro within my document. I put my macro on to my quick access toolbar.

    A colleague wants to use my document and macro himself. I sent him the document but he doesn't see any buttons I set up although the macros can be found and run via Developer ribbon.

    Question - can you share a document with macros and buttons so that the recipient sees the buttons?

    Question - can you create a personal toolbar to store your macros on or do they always have to go on the quick access?

    Question - what happens if you create macros in a template (rather than document) and want to put them on a toolbar for sharing - do I as the developer, have to put them on my quick access? Where would another user of the template find the macros, in their quick access or under add-ins?

    Sorry if these seem straight forward questions to some but this is doing my head in right now and our office support haven't got a clue.[/quote]
    See this recent thread for a discussion on how to associate customizations to the QAT with a specific document or template. That way, when users create or work in documents based on the template, the QAT customizations associated with that template should be available to them.

    Gary

  6. #6
    Plutonium Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    84,353
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 29 Times in 29 Posts
    [quote name='janbphd' post='790003' date='20-Aug-2009 19:43']If you like, you can copy the macros from your document to each user's normal.dotm template.[/quote]
    I'm still using Word 2002/2003, and I frequently create macros and associated toolbar buttons/keyboard shortcuts that will be available only in a specific document, or in documents based on a specific template. I wouldn't want to copy those to the user's Normal template, because they would then be available in ALL documents, where they wouldn't make sense.

    Apart from that, my philosophy is never to modify the user's Normal template. Users should be able to customize their own Word environment to suit their individual preferences. If I had to use Word 2007 (shudder) that would extend to Word.qat too, I guess.

  7. #7
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Northridge, California, USA
    Posts
    230
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
    Gary,

    Thanks for that reminder about creating a document-specific QAT. I thought of mentioning the possibility, but assumed that jayce's users probably wanted to have the macros available at all times (i.e., to add icons to their regular QAT).

    A document-specific QAT can come in handy. I just wish there were a way to expand the QAT beyond a single row.

    Does anyone know if that option will be available in Word 2010? (I haven't seen it yet.)

    Jan
    Author, Formatting Legal Documents With Microsoft Word 2016,
    Formatting Legal Documents With Microsoft Word 2010​,
    and Formatting Legal Documents With Microsoft Office Word 2007

    For Word and WordPerfect tips, visit my blog at http://compusavvy.wordpress.com

  8. #8
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Northridge, California, USA
    Posts
    230
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
    Hi, Hans,

    I understand your concerns, but I don't see why users wouldn't want the macros jayce mentioned (e.g., finding and removing hidden text) to be available globally. In this specific instance, I think it makes a certain amount of sense to add the macros to users' normal.dotm, but of course it depends on the particular circumstances.

    Creating a document-specific QAT would seem to be an ideal answer if not for the fact that the QAT is restricted to a single row. What happens when you create a document-specific QAT is that it gets squished into a tiny corner of the normal QAT (if you have already added a number of your frequently-used commands to the QAT). So it's not a perfect solution, though it certainly can be helpful.

    If Word 2010 allows users to create a QAT with multiple rows, that would help a great deal.

    Jan
    Author, Formatting Legal Documents With Microsoft Word 2016,
    Formatting Legal Documents With Microsoft Word 2010​,
    and Formatting Legal Documents With Microsoft Office Word 2007

    For Word and WordPerfect tips, visit my blog at http://compusavvy.wordpress.com

  9. #9
    Plutonium Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    84,353
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 29 Times in 29 Posts
    [quote name='janbphd' post='790012' date='20-Aug-2009 20:07']I don't see why users wouldn't want the macros jayce mentioned (e.g., finding and removing hidden text) to be available globally.[/quote]
    Fair enough!

  10. #10
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Northridge, California, USA
    Posts
    230
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
    Thanks, Hans. You are not only a fount of wisdom, but also very thoughtful, fair-minded, and a gentleman.

    Jan

    P.S. On a completely different topic, I mentioned one of your tips (and gave you credit for it) in a post on my blog last June. You can find that post here: http://compusavvy.wordpress.com/2009/06/11...ecent-versions/
    Author, Formatting Legal Documents With Microsoft Word 2016,
    Formatting Legal Documents With Microsoft Word 2010​,
    and Formatting Legal Documents With Microsoft Office Word 2007

    For Word and WordPerfect tips, visit my blog at http://compusavvy.wordpress.com

  11. #11
    Plutonium Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    84,353
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 29 Times in 29 Posts
    [quote name='janbphd' post='790015' date='20-Aug-2009 20:39']I mentioned one of your tips (and gave you credit for it) in a post on my blog last June.[/quote]
    Thank you very much!

    And let me also take this opportunity to thank you for the excellent assistance you've given here in the Word forum lately!

  12. #12
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    2,970
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 29 Times in 27 Posts
    [quote name='janbphd' post='790010' date='20-Aug-2009 14:01']Gary,

    Thanks for that reminder about creating a document-specific QAT. I thought of mentioning the possibility, but assumed that jayce's users probably wanted to have the macros available at all times (i.e., to add icons to their regular QAT).

    A document-specific QAT can come in handy. I just wish there were a way to expand the QAT beyond a single row.

    Does anyone know if that option will be available in Word 2010? (I haven't seen it yet.)

    Jan[/quote]
    Jan,

    You raise a good point - if someone wanted to share macros to be available globally in their Word session, then template-specific macros wouldn't do the job. I do agree with Hans though about leaving the Normal template alone.

    As to the 2010 toolbars, the only hint I've seen so far has been an article in Woody's Office Watch that discusses a major change in Ribbon customizability in Office 2010 - it appears the Ribbon will be customizable via the Word user interface, similarly to how we've become familiar with customizing toolbars in Word versions up until 2003. (The article also touches on a way to export a Ribbon or parts of a Ribbon to other users.) So maybe the constraint of sticking to the QAT, won't even be applicable.

    While this sounds like great news for most everybody, it does raise some fascinating, and maybe vexing issues about development using Office 2007:

    - Does Office 2007 therefore become an orphan product, in terms of the steps necessary to customize the Ribbon?
    - If a firm has spent money to have their earlier Word custom toolbars migrated to Word 2007 Ribbons, is that investment wasted, considering they could do it "for free" in Word 2010?
    - Is the time a developer invested in learning how to program the Ribbon (via "RibbonX") a wasted investment?
    - Will firms skip Office 2007, and make the jump to Office 2010 instead, to take advantage of this simpler, cheaper Ribbon customizability?
    - Will this new, easier Ribbon customizability via the user interface be accompanied by a new and relatively simpler means to customize the Ribbon programatically? - or will customizing the Ribbon programatically still require the RibbonX methods?

    It promises to be a fasincating mess....

    Gary

  13. #13
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Northridge, California, USA
    Posts
    230
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
    Hans,

    let me also take this opportunity to thank you for the excellent assistance you've given here in the Word forum lately!
    That's very kind -- and much appreciated.

    I like to help. Plus, it keeps my skills sharp (and often forces me to master additional features of the program). I learn a lot by pitching in and testing to see how things work.

    Gary, your post brings up some intriguing, if a bit troubling, issues about Word 2010. I do think that many companies probably will hold off buying Word 2007 (law firms tend to be late adopters anyway, especially the small and medium-sized firms). But perhaps Microsoft will issue a patch for Word 2007 that will make it easier for users to customize the Ribbon. (? That wouldn't be consistent with their typical business model, but you never know.)

    It certainly will keep me busy, both as a trainer and as an author of computer books (only one book so far; others are in the pipeline, however).

    Jan
    Author, Formatting Legal Documents With Microsoft Word 2016,
    Formatting Legal Documents With Microsoft Word 2010​,
    and Formatting Legal Documents With Microsoft Office Word 2007

    For Word and WordPerfect tips, visit my blog at http://compusavvy.wordpress.com

  14. #14
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    3,852
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 259 Times in 239 Posts
    [quote name='Gary Frieder' post='790049' date='21-Aug-2009 08:02']While this sounds like great news for most everybody, it does raise some fascinating, and maybe vexing issues about development using Office 2007:

    - Does Office 2007 therefore become an orphan product, in terms of the steps necessary to customize the Ribbon?
    - If a firm has spent money to have their earlier Word custom toolbars migrated to Word 2007 Ribbons, is that investment wasted, considering they could do it "for free" in Word 2010?
    - Is the time a developer invested in learning how to program the Ribbon (via "RibbonX") a wasted investment?
    - Will firms skip Office 2007, and make the jump to Office 2010 instead, to take advantage of this simpler, cheaper Ribbon customizability?
    - Will this new, easier Ribbon customizability via the user interface be accompanied by a new and relatively simpler means to customize the Ribbon programatically? - or will customizing the Ribbon programatically still require the RibbonX methods?

    It promises to be a fasincating mess...[/quote]Hi Gary
    I would be very surprised if the new way to customize the Ribbon does not simply create the necessary xml via a user-friendly drag and drop interface. Certainly Word 2007 is screaming out for this functionality and I suspect MS just couldn't get it done in time for that version. So my guess is that the knowledge developers have been forced to acquire is not necessarily lost - in the Word 2010 they should be able to achieve the same thing with the ugly but more powerful coding method they had to learn for Word 2007 or the easier but potentially limited UI method that may be coming.

    Also, investing in learning RibbonX is not necessarily a bad thing if your company is using Word 2007 already - three years between new releases is plenty of time to recover an investment. The productivity losses caused by the 'new improved' Word 2007 interface should have been addressed by clever RibbonX development. In light of the news for Word 2010 though I wouldn't recommend learning RibbonX if you are skipping Word 2007 altogether. If you have been able to avoid it so far, then another year is not too long to wait.

    Here in Australia, only one of my clients has moved to Word 2007 - generally it has been avoided to date along with a very slow corporate transition to Vista. Having used Word 2007 and Vista for two years now, I STILL think I am slightly more productive in the earlier versions and that is even after I have created templates and installed addins to resolve most of the interface issues.
    Andrew Lockton, Chrysalis Design, Melbourne Australia

  15. #15
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    2,970
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 29 Times in 27 Posts
    [quote name='Andrew Lockton' post='790058' date='20-Aug-2009 20:14']Hi Gary
    I would be very surprised if the new way to customize the Ribbon does not simply create the necessary xml via a user-friendly drag and drop interface. Certainly Word 2007 is screaming out for this functionality and I suspect MS just couldn't get it done in time for that version. So my guess is that the knowledge developers have been forced to acquire is not necessarily lost - in the Word 2010 they should be able to achieve the same thing with the ugly but more powerful coding method they had to learn for Word 2007 or the easier but potentially limited UI method that may be coming.

    Also, investing in learning RibbonX is not necessarily a bad thing if your company is using Word 2007 already - three years between new releases is plenty of time to recover an investment. The productivity losses caused by the 'new improved' Word 2007 interface should have been addressed by clever RibbonX development. In light of the news for Word 2010 though I wouldn't recommend learning RibbonX if you are skipping Word 2007 altogether. If you have been able to avoid it so far, then another year is not too long to wait.

    Here in Australia, only one of my clients has moved to Word 2007 - generally it has been avoided to date along with a very slow corporate transition to Vista. Having used Word 2007 and Vista for two years now, I STILL think I am slightly more productive in the earlier versions and that is even after I have created templates and installed addins to resolve most of the interface issues.[/quote]
    Hi Andrew,

    You’re no doubt right about the new way to customize the Ribbon generating xml behind the scenes, as well as this for some reason not having been ready for Office 2007.
    (btw this situation, and the way MS has handled it, reminds me of what happened to VBA in Office for Mac, where it went away and now apparently, is back in the latest version.)
    With earlier versions of Office, there certainly are scenarios where generating commandbars programmatically is the way to go, so that may still hold true with newer versions of Office, in which case knowing how to do the RibbonX programming will still be worthwhile.

    Between the controversial user interface and the slow economy, I think adoption of Office 2007 has been very slow, probably the slowest of any new version. I’ve had a couple of clients move to Office 2007 and, against my advice, insist on sticking with the old pre-2007 file formats – which creates its own set of unique problems and issues.

    Earlier this year I finally taught myself RibbonX, expecting that demand for this would pick up any time now – but still hasn’t, at least for me. Now with the expected Ribbon customizability in Office 2010, I’m likely going to start advising clients to wait for Office 2010, rather than migrate to Office 2007. (Maybe Office 2010 will be to Office 2007, what Windows 7 is to Windows Vista…?)

    I used to think it was important to keep up with the most current technology that MS was pushing (or at least felt guilty if I wasn’t doing so!), but now I’m much more inclined to stick with the old, tried and true. A couple of maybe relevant examples:

    - For several years now, MS has been pushing hard the idea of doing Office development via VSTO / .NET – virtually all of MS’s MSDN technical content, from Office 2003 on, centers on this. There was talk, as far back as 2000, about VBA going away. But lately there’s controversy about MS perhaps ‘effectively deprecating’ .NET through its emphasis on native code over .NET in new Vista and Windows 7 classes (not something I work with, but have read about) – it does make you wonder about MS’s long-term commitment to .NET.

    - Another thing that’s gotten pushed hard for Office 2007 development is using custom XML, and programming Office purely via XML. (Another area where I’ve read MSDN articles, and wondered whether I was missing the boat). But with the current lawsuit over custom XML, there’s the possibility that MS might just withdraw custom XML support in Office – leaving anyone who developed using this, SOL.

    I don’t feel nearly as bad anymore, sticking with the ways that have been proven to work, and only touching the new features where forced to.

    Gary

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •