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  1. #1
    Platinum Lounger
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    I have mis-understood some part of the mechanisms of cleaners.
    I had thought that they would (amongst other things) trawl the registry looking for file-values where the files no longer existed, and take that as a cue to delete the key.

    I've spent the day playing around with keys for Excel AddIns (screenshot) and have happily sprayed two file names into versions 8, 9, 10, 11 & 12 of Office.
    That worked (I load Excel and the Addins are checked ON!)

    At the end of the day I moved the two XLA files out of the Library folder, and ran EasyCleaner 2.0.6.380, but even after a refresh (F5) in regEdit the keys were still there.

    I downloaded the latest CCleaner 2.23.993, and again even after a refresh (F5) in regEdit the keys were still there.

    What am I missing?
    Scanning the registry for non-existent files seemed to me the most obvious first-step in eliminating garbage.

    (signed) "No longer an expert" of Toronto.
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  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Registry cleaners aren't perfect. Checking every file mentioned in the registry would probably take an excessive amount of time - searching for a non-existing file is slow.

  3. #3
    Platinum Lounger
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    [quote name='HansV' post='791587' date='31-Aug-2009 16:52']Checking every file mentioned in the registry would probably take an excessive amount of time - searching for a non-existing file is slow.[/quote]
    Hans, thanks for the confirmation.
    I still think it is odd.
    Now I'm wondering what they DO detect, since non-existent files was the only thing I could think of!

    If *I* were writing a registry cleaner, I'd acknowledge the time factor but build a list and ask the user if they wanted to invest ??ms/file to test/fix.
    Of course, there'd be a command-line switch so's it could be performed during the overnight run .....

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