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  1. #1
    Plutonium Lounger
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    From a PerfectDisk newsletter and here on their web site: Microsoft Certifies Raxco Software's PerfectDisk 10 for Windows 7:
    "No other disk defragmenter has achieved this certification from Microsoft."
    (so far)

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  3. #2
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    [quote name='Bigaldoc' post='793352' date='15-Sep-2009 10:29']From a PerfectDisk newsletter and here on their web site: Microsoft Certifies Raxco Software's PerfectDisk 10 for Windows 7:
    "No other disk defragmenter has achieved this certification from Microsoft."
    (so far)[/quote]
    An interesting blog on the built-in defragmenter in Windows 7 says, among other things:
    "Best practices for using defragmentation in Windows 7 are simple – you do not need to do anything! Defragmentation is scheduled to automatically run periodically and in the background with minimal impact to foreground activity."
    BATcher

    Mr Owl ate my metal worm

  4. #3
    Plutonium Lounger
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    [quote name='BATcher' post='793355' date='15-Sep-2009 06:57']... "Best practices for using defragmentation in Windows 7 are simple – you do not need to do anything! Defragmentation is scheduled to automatically run periodically and in the background with minimal impact to foreground activity."[/quote]
    Interesting, and it will be (I think) a moot point for me because of my "pattern" (habit) of nightly incremental backups with Shadow Protect. I intend to continue that process and because of that, I only run a defrag periodically, PRIOR to a full backup image. I don't think I would want a real time defragger running all the time but I could be wrong.

  5. #4
    Plutonium Lounger Leif's Avatar
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    [quote name='Bigaldoc' post='793361' date='15-Sep-2009 13:11']....I only run a defrag periodically, PRIOR to a full backup image.[/quote]
    Hmmmm. My instinct would be to do the backup before the defrag, just in case the defrag broke something...

  6. #5
    Plutonium Lounger
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    [quote name='Leif' post='793362' date='15-Sep-2009 08:26']Hmmmm. My instinct would be to do the backup before the defrag, just in case the defrag broke something...[/quote]
    I don't remember if I read here or in the Shadow Protect forum that one should NOT run a defragger AFTER making a full backup IF you will be running incrementals. At any rate, even if the defrag did mess something up, I always have the backup from the prior overnight to recover from.

    Regarding the Win7 real time defrag, I took a quick look, realizing of course that this is the release candidate and not the RTM code. But I don't see anything in the menu structure, including the scheduler details not shown here. Weekly must be the default since I've not been in there:

    [attachment=85531:2009_09_15_082749.png]

    And, as an afterthought, I looked in my newly purchased book (Post 793058) for the section on defragging and there is no mention there about continuous defrag. I'll have to wait for my RTM...
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #6
    Plutonium Lounger Leif's Avatar
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    [quote name='Bigaldoc' post='793366' date='15-Sep-2009 13:46']I don't remember if I read here or in the Shadow Protect forum that one should NOT run a defragger AFTER making a full backup IF you will be running incrementals.[/quote]
    Interesting - why ever not?

  8. #7
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Just one quote out of MANY posts and threads on the SP forum:
    "...It is recommended to do a disk defrag prior to a full backup and not after. If you do it after, the next incremental will be larger than it would normally be. How much larger? Depends on how aggressive the disk defrag used was (3rd party disk defrag programmes have more optimisation options available..."

  9. #8
    Plutonium Lounger Leif's Avatar
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    [quote name='Bigaldoc' post='793371' date='15-Sep-2009 14:33'][/quote]
    That doesn't tie in with my assumption of what an incremental backup is, which is simply to backup data that has changed. Presumably, as you are backing up an image, the incremental backup is backing up changes to the image - which would also infer that deleting a file would also be reflected in the amount of information and hence the size of your incremental backup...?

  10. #9
    Plutonium Lounger
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    [quote name='Leif' post='793376' date='15-Sep-2009 09:49'][/quote]
    Well, I'm not technically qualified to discourse with you on the topic, Leif. But in my "computer enthusiast" understanding of it, an imaging program backs up "bits" without regard to file structure. That's all I (think) I know, so I'd better bail out unless someone else has something to add.


  11. #10
    Plutonium Lounger Leif's Avatar
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    [quote name='Bigaldoc' post='793379' date='15-Sep-2009 15:02'][/quote]
    An image - to my knowledge - is literally that. Or as Wikipedia puts it:
    A disk image is a single file or storage device containing the complete contents and structure representing a data storage medium or device, such as a hard drive, floppy disk, CD, or DVD, although an image of an optical disc may be referred to as an optical disc image. A disk image is usually created by creating a complete sector-by-sector copy of the source medium and thereby perfectly replicating the structure and contents of a storage device.
    My understanding of that is that if you restore an image, the files are replaced in exactly the same place on the disc.

    But it still doesn't fully explain why an incremental backup has to be larger because you've defragged the drive....

  12. #11
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    [quote name='Leif' post='793381' date='15-Sep-2009 09:17']An image - to my knowledge - is literally that. Or as Wikipedia puts it:
    A disk image is a single file or storage device containing the complete contents and structure representing a data storage medium or device, such as a hard drive, floppy disk, CD, or DVD, although an image of an optical disc may be referred to as an optical disc image. A disk image is usually created by creating a complete sector-by-sector copy of the source medium and thereby perfectly replicating the structure and contents of a storage device.
    My understanding of that is that if you restore an image, the files are replaced in exactly the same place on the disc.

    But it still doesn't fully explain why an incremental backup has to be larger because you've defragged the drive....[/quote]

    It is the sector-by-sector copy that causes it. I believe the backup software is keeping a sector bitmap. Running a defrag after a full image backup will move many sectors causing the backup software to act as though much more data has changed even though it is only the position that has changed.

    Joe

  13. #12
    Plutonium Lounger Leif's Avatar
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    [quote name='joeperez' post='793388' date='15-Sep-2009 15:55'][/quote]
    That makes sense - thanks!

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