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  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
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    I recently had a TiVo crash and Direct TV sent me a new DVR to replace it.
    I had several programs recorded on the TiVo, so I pulled the Western Digital hard drive in hopes of recovering the contents onto my computer.
    Is this something doable or should I just wipe the drive and use it as a second storage system.

    Thanks,
    Richard Spring

  2. #2
    Uranium Lounger
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    From here....

    "SpinRite v6.0 recognizes and operates on ALL file systems. It can even be used to repair and recover Apple Macintosh and Tivo hard drives by temporarily moving them into an Intel-based PC. It can also be used to check the health of drives that have not yet been formatted.

    SpinRite v6.0 brings along and automatically boots a copy of the FreeDOS operating system, so it will run even if you have no “DOS”. It can create bootable diskettes, CD‑R’s, USB Flash drives and other media."
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  3. #3
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    [quote name='DocWatson' post='795070' date='26-Sep-2009 16:42']From here....

    "SpinRite v6.0 recognizes and operates on ALL file systems. It can even be used to repair and recover Apple Macintosh and Tivo hard drives by temporarily moving them into an Intel-based PC. It can also be used to check the health of drives that have not yet been formatted.

    SpinRite v6.0 brings along and automatically boots a copy of the FreeDOS operating system, so it will run even if you have no “DOS”. It can create bootable diskettes, CD‑R’s, USB Flash drives and other media."[/quote]

    Thanks Doc.
    I checked the SpinRite link and it would not go throught. I checked several URLs for their site and kept getting dead links. Any suggestions.
    Richard Spring

  4. #4
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    [quote name='RSpring' post='795072' date='26-Sep-2009 19:56']Thanks Doc.
    I checked the SpinRite link and it would not go throught. I checked several URLs for their site and kept getting dead links. Any suggestions.[/quote]

    HERE is the link you want.

    There is also a multitude of lesser recovery programs, some free or that you may already have (if you have any major utility suite, check those), but Gibson is the acknowledged 'best' so far as I know.

  5. #5
    Uranium Lounger
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    [quote name='RSpring' post='795072' date='26-Sep-2009 19:56']Thanks Doc.
    I checked the SpinRite link and it would not go throught. I checked several URLs for their site and kept getting dead links. Any suggestions.[/quote]
    Can't say I know what the problem is. Both my link and the one posted by peterg work for me ???
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  6. #6
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    With apologies to Doc Watson, I failed to check his link before I posted mine, and both work for me as well, so I have no idea what your problem is. I just happened to know where to look (i.e. the Gibson site).

    In your case, you can work from the top down or the bottom up, according to the value of the data you want to recover. You can acquire SpinRite OutRite, if you’ll pardon the expression, and rationalize the purchase by saying that it will pay back its significant cost over time, and you can hasten the payback period by letting the locals know that you happen to have it and will attempt to recover their data or fix their drives for a price, while making sure that you are on the right side of the law in all such endeavours. SpinRite is typically a professional trouble-shooter’s or system manager’s tool, and I doubt that it has a large user base among home users.

    If you want to start at the bottom you will begin with the obvious: Windows CHKDSK. Chksk /? will give you the switches (typically you want chkdsk /r) and you can untangle it from there. Most users run this less often than they should, I suspect.

    I mentioned utility suites, and I guess Norton Disk Doctor is the tool in the Norton suite that was most influential. I think SystemSuite has something similar and System Mechanic, if you pick the right version and download it as a 30-day trial, will include a file recovery utility. If you choose to buy the last named suite, it is at present fifty bucks for three computers. I can’t vouch for the recovery tool, having never used it, although I do have it, but thirty days is plenty of time to solve your problem if the utility works, and if it works then you may be their next customer.

  7. #7
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    [quote name='peterg' date='26-Sep-:20']With apologies to Doc Watson, I failed to check his link before I posted mine, and both work for me as well, so I have no idea what your problem is. I just happened to know where to look (i.e. the Gibson site).

    In your case, you can work from the top down or the bottom up, according to the value of the data you want to recover. You can acquire SpinRite OutRite, if you’ll pardon the expression, and rationalize the purchase by saying that it will pay back its significant cost over time, and you can hasten the payback period by letting the locals know that you happen to have it and will attempt to recover their data or fix their drives for a price, while making sure that you are on the right side of the law in all such endeavours. SpinRite is typically a professional trouble-shooter’s or system manager’s tool, and I doubt that it has a large user base among home users.

    If you want to start at the bottom you will begin with the obvious: Windows CHKDSK. Chksk /? will give you the switches (typically you want chkdsk /r) and you can untangle it from there. Most users run this less often than they should, I suspect.

    I mentioned utility suites, and I guess Norton Disk Doctor is the tool in the Norton suite that was most influential. I think SystemSuite has something similar and System Mechanic, if you pick the right version and download it as a 30-day trial, will include a file recovery utility. If you choose to buy the last named suite, it is at present fifty bucks for three computers. I can’t vouch for the recovery tool, having never used it, although I do have it, but thirty days is plenty of time to solve your problem if the utility works, and if it works then you may be their next customer.[/quote]

    Thank you Doc and Peter:

    I should realize by now if a link does not work on my computer I need to reload my modem and router to get a new IP address. Don't know why this keeps happening.
    Any now the links do work and I will check them out.

    Thanks again for the quick response.
    Richard Spring

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