Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    A cultural area in SW England
    Posts
    3,421
    Thanks
    33
    Thanked 195 Times in 175 Posts
    Should have been a question-mark at the end of the title, but 'title character rationing' occurred.

    I can't see how it would be possible to do a clean install from a Windows 7 Upgrade DVD which is not bootable, and which needs you to run Setup.exe.

    I started with Vista Home Premium 32-bit on the hard disk, then installed Vista HP 64-bit (resizing the disk into C: plus D, then 'upgraded' using the vendor-supplied Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit upgrade DVD. Then I did a final 'upgrade' of Windows 7 64-bit on top of itself, ending up with the Windows.OLD directory structure, which I deleted. Oddly I have been supplied with a new Windows 7 Product key - which it doesn't ask for. A bizarre and unexpected result is that in Device Manager I have a yellow exclamation mark next to Other -> Coprocessor! (No idea why, can't find a driver for whatever it is, and it doesn't seem to matter).

    I am just (this moment!) wondering whether if I do a Windows 7 upgrade to the D: partition, then reformat the C: partition - if it allows me - then maybe I can do a clean install/upgrade to the C: partition?

    Anyway, has anyone any 'clean install' suggestions in this unusual circumstance?
    BATcher

    Time prevents everything happening all at once...

  2. #2
    Bronze Lounger
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Peterborough, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,450
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Quote Originally Posted by BATcher View Post
    Should have been a question-mark at the end of the title, but 'title character rationing' occurred.

    I can't see how it would be possible to do a clean install from a Windows 7 Upgrade DVD which is not bootable, and which needs you to run Setup.exe.

    I started with Vista Home Premium 32-bit on the hard disk, then installed Vista HP 64-bit (resizing the disk into C: plus D, then 'upgraded' using the vendor-supplied Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit upgrade DVD. Then I did a final 'upgrade' of Windows 7 64-bit on top of itself, ending up with the Windows.OLD directory structure, which I deleted. Oddly I have been supplied with a new Windows 7 Product key - which it doesn't ask for. A bizarre and unexpected result is that in Device Manager I have a yellow exclamation mark next to Other -> Coprocessor! (No idea why, can't find a driver for whatever it is, and it doesn't seem to matter).

    I am just (this moment!) wondering whether if I do a Windows 7 upgrade to the D: partition, then reformat the C: partition - if it allows me - then maybe I can do a clean install/upgrade to the C: partition?

    Anyway, has anyone any 'clean install' suggestions in this unusual circumstance?
    It is far from unusual and has generated a considerable volume of material from various sources. First check the thread Can I trust Microsoft's upgrade path?, which is a short distance prior to your post. Pay close attention to Woody's discussion, and to Paul Thurrott's site, which is the source of so much material on the subject. (I am using a 'foreign' computer and can't conveniently give you the links.) Your description sounds remarkably like the dual-boot setup that I have recently finalized, and you might revisit the first of the links that Joe gave me.

    When it comes to drivers and compatibilities, I have found that once Windows 7 is installed, it is useful to install the latest (v.2) Windows 7 Compatibility gizmo from MS on the Windows 7 installation. That's right, run it under Windows 7. It may pick up any number of incompatibilities or offer links to suitable updates. This is strong stuff.

    What interests me is your remarks about the 'old' directory structure, for I have just such a problem that I blundered into. It seems that I changed the user name of my 'Administrator' (access) account under Vista, without realizing that I was changing the account name, and not just the user name. The original name had assigned folder names all over the map and I have to figure out what I did or didn't do and see if I can gracefully back out of it. Outlook is totally messed up as a result of it, and if you have any words of wisdom etc.

    Regards,

    Peter

    Here is a link to the discussion by http://www.winsupersite.com/win7/cle...rade_media.asp

  3. #3
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    A cultural area in SW England
    Posts
    3,421
    Thanks
    33
    Thanked 195 Times in 175 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by peterg View Post
    What interests me is your remarks about the 'old' directory structure, for I have just such a problem that I blundered into. It seems that I changed the user name of my 'Administrator' (access) account under Vista, without realizing that I was changing the account name, and not just the user name. The original name had assigned folder names all over the map and I have to figure out what I did or didn't do and see if I can gracefully back out of it. Outlook is totally messed up as a result of it, and if you have any words of wisdom etc.
    Thanks, Peter - I'd read that Paul Thurrott article before, but it didn't really sink in!

    I looked at the Windows 7 Upgrade DVD yet again, and it said Recovery Disk. This must mean that it is bootable, so I tried, yet again, and this time it actually booted and came up with the install information. I've no idea how it didn't do this before, since the boot order is DVD then hard disk. It does, however, give a message "Press any key to boot from CD or DVD", and I must have been just that bit too slow. I thought that the reason it went on to boot from the hard disk was because the DVD was non-bootable. Grrrh - hours wasted, since I didn't need to install Vista 64-bit either.

    I'm not sure I understand your distinction between 'user name' and 'account name', since I regard them as synonymous. Whichever 'account'/'name' you use will cause folders to be created in "Documents and Settings" or any new-fangled equivalent, and it is extraordinarily messy attempting to rename these, should you feel the need, and obtain a positive result.
    BATcher

    Time prevents everything happening all at once...

  4. #4
    Bronze Lounger
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Peterborough, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,450
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Quote Originally Posted by BATcher View Post
    Thanks, Peter - I'd read that Paul Thurrott article before, but it didn't really sink in!

    I'm not sure I understand your distinction between 'user name' and 'account name', since I regard them as synonymous. Whichever 'account'/'name' you use will cause folders to be created in "Documents and Settings" or any new-fangled equivalent, and it is extraordinarily messy attempting to rename these, should you feel the need, and obtain a positive result.
    Glad to hear that you have Win 7 installed. I like it very much (both 32 and 64). Now you can reset your boot order to start with the hard drive.

    What I did was in Vista, but I presume it is similar to the description I have before me of the same thing in Windows 7. Here, taken from p.556 of Windows 7 Inside Out by Ed Bott et.al. is the description: 'Although User Accounts doesn't explain the distinction, when you change the name here you're changing the full name (the one that appears on the Welcome screen, on the Start menu, and in User accounts), not the user name.

    That is what I blundered into: I changed one thing with a view to having a certain consistency for the names between computers, and ended up with all sorts of things like folders that retain the original name, and the foot won't fit the new shoe. It is the old business of making a change that 'ripples through' (or fails to do so), to use the expression much loved by certain writers. I think I can get out of it, but it is far from certain. That is still a Vista computer, and I am desperate to install Win 7 on it. The thing is loaded with HP's proprietary software, and I want to perform an in-place upgrade to keep the stuff. I will certainly create an image before trying, and I have the LapLink utility to use if I choose to, but I haven't heard many reports of its success for failure, or even if anyone (apart from one thread in the Lounge) has used it. I bought two copies, and haven't used it myself yet.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •