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  1. #1
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    I currently am running 64-bit Windows 7 Home Premium and all my software (except Microsoft Security Essentials), even the stuff that says it's Window 7 compatible, or has a specific Windows 7 version, installs in the Program Files (X86) folder. If I upgrade to Professional, but use the 32-bit version, will I have more success with getting the software to integrate correctly? For a specific, I'm still using Eudora for email, and it can't integrate into the registry, so it can't be my default email. Will it work correctly if I switch to the 32-bit version, either Home Premium or Professional?

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    New Lounger
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    Yes, you will be much better off in the 32bit versions because as you noticed, the 32bit program files have a different path name and some programs simply won't accept the oddly named Program Files (x86) in their pathing and still run. I suspect that some coders chose to hard code the old path names instead of accepting any string. Also you also mentioned the registering issues which is a common issue in 64bit versions of windows.

    Basically the rules are much tighter in any 64 bit version of Windows and so drivers and registry access are often rejected unless the program is certified with Microsoft.

    I've determined that even though I lost the ability to use a number of programs that were specific to my industry and job, I prefer the tighter security model of the 64bit Windows 7 as well as the larger memory model (running 12gigabytes of DDR3 RAM) so I have a second system for the older stuff that just has to run in the 32bit modes.

    I found that Mozilla's Thunderbird seemed much less stable on 64bit versions as well but I don't know that it's tied to either of the above issues.

    Eventually the industry will be all 64bit but that time is not yet here.

    Eric

  3. #3
    Star Lounger
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    I don't understand your comment on completely integrate??? I am running Eudora on Win7 64bit with no problems whatever. So is my wife on her machine and believe me if she had any issue I would have heard about it big time. I don't have any problem with Eudora being the default email. Have you gone to start and clicked on default programs?

  4. #4
    New Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by D Goldstein View Post
    I currently am running 64-bit Windows 7 Home Premium and all my software (except Microsoft Security Essentials), even the stuff that says it's Window 7 compatible, or has a specific Windows 7 version, installs in the Program Files (X86) folder. If I upgrade to Professional, but use the 32-bit version, will I have more success with getting the software to integrate correctly? For a specific, I'm still using Eudora for email, and it can't integrate into the registry, so it can't be my default email. Will it work correctly if I switch to the 32-bit version, either Home Premium or Professional?

    Thanks in advance!
    I am running Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit. Eudora has no problem running and is my default email program.

  5. #5
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    A) How did you install Eudora to get it to integrate with the registry? Could it be that I didn't use the default installation path? Every time I open Eudora it says it was unable to update the registry, and thus unable to change my default email program.

    B) Eudora isn't available in my default programs list, and there doesn't seem to be any way to add to it.

    Could this be another reason to upgrade to the Professional version?

  6. #6
    New Lounger Marine2009's Avatar
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    The x64Bit OS puts the files of the x86 programs into their own folder for a reason. That way the 64 Bit OS can run them more smoothly instead of messing up its structure,
    I have used x64Bit OS for the last four years, and I have had NO Problems with any software, 32Bit or 64Bit Either. The x64Bit was designed to run large amounts of memory
    in a better method and way. By running higher amounts of memory, the programs thus run much smoother, faster. Just Google the question x86 vs. x64, you will see pages upon
    pages of it. The true way to test which is better for you is too run each in their own environment and benchmark test them running the same programs.

  7. #7
    New Lounger
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    I am new to the Windows 7 64 bit operating system as well. I was unable to get McAfee antivirus suite to work with it and I switched to Microsoft Security Essentials without a hitch now. I have a laptop with Windows Vista 64 bit (both are Home Premium versions) and I haven't had any issues on the laptop running any software.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by D Goldstein View Post
    A) How did you install Eudora to get it to integrate with the registry? Could it be that I didn't use the default installation path? Every time I open Eudora it says it was unable to update the registry, and thus unable to change my default email program.

    B) Eudora isn't available in my default programs list, and there doesn't seem to be any way to add to it.

    Could this be another reason to upgrade to the Professional version?
    A) I just ran the install and let it take all the defaults. Why are you changing the install path? I would never change any install path for any program unless I was running out of space on the boot drive and if I was having space problems that means it is time to reinstall everything to a bigger disk or at least a bigger partition. That being said, I do have my messages stored on a different drive, but that is because I use Eudora on multiple computers and can access the message store from all of them. I learned long time ago that it is best to install ALL programs using the default locations since that is where all troubleshooters and and other programs will look for the program if and when you have a problem,

    B) This is not a reason to upgrade to Professional unless you are looking for a reason. To me Professional is primarily needed when you have a domain controller server in your network and you want to log on using domain services.

  9. #9
    New Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Nealand View Post
    B) This is not a reason to upgrade to Professional unless you are looking for a reason. To me Professional is primarily needed when you have a domain controller server in your network and you want to log on using domain services.

    OR

    You want to do remote access using the built in Windows RDC client/server software. I often use one system to run software on another system (32/64 bit versions) and it's very convenient to simply open the remote system and have it's screen and software all on mine so I can control that remote system. None of the Home versions allow that, Professional is the lowest version that allows remote control.

    Oh, and before someone suggests it, I may be dumb for not being able to get the free VNC (in any of the many versions I've found) to connect and work across the various Home versions but I've been spectacularly unsuccessful in getting them to configure and work even within a local area network that didn't have any extra routing or subnets.

  10. #10
    2 Star Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by D Goldstein View Post
    I currently am running 64-bit Windows 7 Home Premium and all my software (except Microsoft Security Essentials), even the stuff that says it's Window 7 compatible, or has a specific Windows 7 version, installs in the Program Files (X86) folder. If I upgrade to Professional, but use the 32-bit version, will I have more success with getting the software to integrate correctly? For a specific, I'm still using Eudora for email, and it can't integrate into the registry, so it can't be my default email. Will it work correctly if I switch to the 32-bit version, either Home Premium or Professional?
    There's no need to upgrade to Win7 Pro for the reason you want.

    First, I am running Win7 x64 and there are NO problems with 32-bit programs installing themselves into the (x86) folder...that's where they belong. DON'T move them or install them into plain Program Files, that's for 64-bit programs.

    Second, you can safely change the default drive at install time from C: to D: or any other drive letter you have on your machine. But to repeat the above, DO NOT change the particular \Program Files\ or \Program Files (x86)\ directory Windows chooses.

    Third, while it's possible to change the default drive location from C: to something else in the registry, I strongly recommend against that, for reasons I'll post in another thread topic.

  11. #11
    New Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Finch View Post
    There's no need to upgrade to Win7 Pro for the reason you want.

    First, I am running Win7 x64 and there are NO problems with 32-bit programs installing themselves into the (x86) folder...that's where they belong. DON'T move them or install them into plain Program Files, that's for 64-bit programs.

    Second, you can safely change the default drive at install time from C: to D: or any other drive letter you have on your machine. But to repeat the above, DO NOT change the particular \Program Files\ or \Program Files (x86)\ directory Windows chooses.

    Third, while it's possible to change the default drive location from C: to something else in the registry, I strongly recommend against that, for reasons I'll post in another thread topic.
    Ralph,

    The original poster wasn't attempting to move the installation between the 32 and 64 bit folders but was attempting to just install a program which apparently won't accept the new folder names that Microsoft has chosen to implement. The original poster also did NOT attempt to edit the registry but rather has asked why the program would not register itself during it's default installation and thus would not operate. Granted his wording was awkward but the meaning was clear enough.

    I've found a number of programs (even some major packages like Adobe's Creative Suite) will not install correctly in 64 bit windows without some special steps to get around the new naming structure (for the 32/64 bit program files folders) and the registering functions of the higher security 64 bit windows.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by D Goldstein View Post
    I currently am running 64-bit Windows 7 Home Premium and all my software (except Microsoft Security Essentials), even the stuff that says it's Window 7 compatible, or has a specific Windows 7 version, installs in the Program Files (X86) folder. If I upgrade to Professional, but use the 32-bit version, will I have more success with getting the software to integrate correctly? For a specific, I'm still using Eudora for email, and it can't integrate into the registry, so it can't be my default email. Will it work correctly if I switch to the 32-bit version, either Home Premium or Professional?

    Thanks in advance!
    Remember that changing the "bitness" of the operating system requires a clean install.

    Joe
    Joe

  13. #13
    Lounger
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    Thank you all. I will try reinstalling Eudora to the default location and see if that helps with the registry problem. I will try the same thing with the Window 7 specific software that has installed into the Program Files (x86) folder and see what happens.

  14. #14
    2 Star Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Dorn View Post
    Oh, and before someone suggests it, I may be dumb for not being able to get the free VNC (in any of the many versions I've found) to connect and work across the various Home versions but I've been spectacularly unsuccessful in getting them to configure and work even within a local area network that didn't have any extra routing or subnets.
    Teamviewer is pretty nice, that's what I use.

  15. #15
    Lounger
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    I uninstalled Eudora from the custom folder and let it install to the default location. Nothing changed: It still says "Eudora was unable to update the system registry. Your default mail program has not been changed."

    Any ideas, anyone?

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