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  1. #1
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
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    Is anyone interested in conversing about the features, benefits of successfully making full images of:
    -- c-drive [my OS, applications, utilities, and so on], and
    -- d-drive [my infomation, data, audio, video, Word and ASCII files, install zips and Executes].

    I have been able to re-store both c-drive and d-drive of full images.
    I have not tried:
    -- overwriting present images [I delete older images as I add newer ones]
    -- incremental backups

    My c-drive images go onto the 2nd physical [secondary] 20GB HD's logical f-drive
    my d-drive images go onto the 1st physical [primary] 2oGB HD's logical e-drive
    [12/15 - corrected a typo!]

    Also, there are 2 c-drive CD sets and 2 d-drive CD sets; which are restorable.

    From hard knocks, EZ-learning [from others], practice and experience, I have learned some things about making both drive-to-drive images and drive-to-CD images, along with storing same, and finally restoring image[s] from either HD or CD.

    I'll stop here for now, to see if there are others interested in sharing.

    Roland
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  2. #2
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    Roland,
    I'm some what of a Ghost guru, since I'm a PC professional and I've been using Ghost since it was first released by its originating company in New Zealand in ~ 1997. (Before Symantec bought it and turned it into "Norton's Ghost").

    The original Ghost, even the 2003 version was written to be run from a bootable floppy disk.
    That's the only way you can run Ghost 2003 (to my knowledge) and get it to put itself on a Ghost backup CD or DVD, thus making it bootable.

    Ghost will do a partition backup or a disk backup, either disk to disk or disk to Image, but will not do an incremental backup.
    It was written to be a HD backup program, not a FILE backup program.

    I back up my C: drive at least once every week, using the Partition to Image backup in FAST compression mode, to a second (storage) hard drive.
    Then once every two weeks I do a Partition to Image with HIGH compression, to a DVD. Ghost Knows, that I'm booting from a floppy disk and it offers to put itself on the DVD, thus making it boot up exactly like the floppy did.

    My Ghost boot floppy was formatted on a windows ME PC, which is a better DOS than windows 98.
    I then set up a dos menu to give me several options in the way I run Ghost. I've even included several batch files, to clean out various JUNK files on the HD before Ghost actually runs.
    I even run Windows XP on a FAT-32 HD, so I can have DOS control over every file on my HD.

    Here's the menu screen that comes up when I boot up my system with my Ghost 2003 boot floppy:

    


     GHOST 2003 Menu 

    1. Run Ghost to make a new image. (Windows XP Only)
    This program will delete all temp files, etc.
    The Cleanup works only on a FAT-32 partition.

    2. Run Ghost
    This program runs Ghost alone, with NO cleanup being done.
    Use this version to do Ghost Restores or Ghost image without cleanup.
    You must use this option on any NTFS partition.

    3. Run Ghost then shutdown PC when Ghost is done.

    4. Delete all Restore points (Windows XP. Works on FAT-32 partition only)

    5. Delete Windows "Pagefile" (Windows XP. Works on FAT-32 partitions only)

    6. Do Full Cleanup and run Ghost (#5, #4, #1)


    Type in a number at the DOS Prompt and press ENTER.

    The weird codes are Ansi color codes to provide me with a nice colored menu screen,
    so, the Ansi.sys driver has to be loaded via the config.sys file, during boot up.

    I can boot up and Backup any OS, up to Vista or Win-7, with Ghost 2003. For those two OS's, I must
    use Ghost 11.5, booted from a Flash Drive or CD.
    Version 11.5 looks and runs exactly like 2003, but is considerably larger so it won't fit on
    a boot floppy disk.
    It also comes in a Ghost32.exe version that can be run from your Vista or Win-7 desktop shortcut icon.

    This conversation could easily get into the 'forbidden' area, by the strictest application of Forum Rules, so if you need to,
    just drop me a PM.

    Do you have a floppy drive on your computer, or how else do you run Ghost 2003?

    Happy Holidays!
    The Doctor
    Experience is truly the best teacher.

    Backup! Backup! Backup! GHOST Rocks!

  3. #3
    Silver Lounger RolandJS's Avatar
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    Dr. Who:
    Many thanks for your informative reply!
    I have a combo [3.5 & 5.25] floppy drive - I had to "re-cobble" my DOS-boot Norton Ghost diskette to suit me, right after I first purchased Ghost as part of the Norton System suite.
    I have in the past added a few files to an image, quite often it is not a smooth OP, kinda sorta clunky.
    So far, I have an original and working copy of my "souped-up DOS-boot Norton Ghost 2003" 3.5 diskettes.
    I noticed that Norton Ghost has quite an extensive menu of DOS-switches.
    Have you been able to make a text file of the switches? I have not been able to as of yet.
    ghost ? ghost /? ghost help ghost /help -- has not worked for me.
    RolandJS
    "Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee." Ben Franklin revisited.
    http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forum...-Technologies/

  4. #4
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    Seems like forever since I've been here. Sorry about that!

    Switches? I don't use them since I always run Ghost manually with my mouse and keyboard, so I can
    perfectly control the operations. Running Ghost from a batch file, with switches, locks you in to a certain
    operation which you cannot vary once it starts.
    I guess you could say that I'm just one of those "Hands ON" kind of guys.
    Since I make my Ghost Images to different locations at different times I need to be able to control that
    manually. I also do a CHECK of every backup image that I make. Nothing could be worse than trying
    to do a Ghost Restore and finding out that your image file is corrupt and unreadable.

    The day I did the upgrade from Windows 98SE to Windows XP (many years ago now) XP did the upgrade
    without changing the disk format type from FAT-32 to NTFS. I found out that XP indeed runs great on a
    FAT-32 HD and that also gives me total control over any file on my HD, from a DOS boot disk, like the
    one I use to boot to Ghost. That also gives me the option of running my Cleanup batch files from the Ghost
    boot disk (usually a 3.5" floppy) to minimize the MB's going into the Ghost backup Image file.
    By deleting the pagefile and the old restore points, I decrease the MB's going into the Ghost Image by over 4 gig's.
    On a good day, I still get an entire Ghost backup on a single DVD, along with Ghost using the HIGH compression mode.
    That doesn't happen by accident..... it does require a lot of disk and data management.

    The list of options, not switches, for Ghost is in the program itself. Just go into "Options" to find them.
    You can use those options to set up how Ghost runs, even in the manual mode.
    When you set options, Ghost will build an .ini file for you. Here's a copy of my own Ghost.ini file.

    span(Spanning) = Y
    autoname(AutoName) = Y
    cns(Old Style Span Extensions) = Y
    crcignore(CRC Ignore) = N
    fcr(Create CRC32) = N
    f32(FAT32 Conversion) = N
    f64(64K FAT Clusters) = N
    fatlimit(FAT Limit) = N
    sure(Sure) = N
    fro(Force Cloning) = N
    rb(Reboot) = N
    fx(Exit to DOS) = N
    defaultImg(Default) = Y
    ia(Image All) = N
    ib(Image Boot) = N
    id(Image Disk) = N
    defaultTape(Default) = Y
    tapesafe(Tape Safe) = N
    tapebuffered(Tape Buffered) = N
    tapeunbuffered(Tape Unbuffered) = N
    tapeeject(Tape Eject) = N
    ffx(UseExtINT13) = N
    fnx(DisableExtINT13) = N
    ffi(DirectIDE) = N
    fni(DisableDirectIDE) = N
    ffs(DirectASPI/SCSI) = N
    fns(DisableDirectASPI/SCSI) = N
    pwd(Prompt for password) = N
    locktype-none(No BIOS lock) = Y
    locktype-M(Manufacturer) = N
    locktype-P(ProductName) = N
    locktype-V(Version) = N
    locktype-S(SerialNo) = N
    locktype-U(UUID) = N
    locktype-C(ManProduct) = N
    locktype-I(P3ID) = N

    The first four yes's are critical to the way I run Ghost.

    "Radified Forums" is a good source of info on all versions of Ghost. Be advised though, that the guys there
    are a bunch of "Legal Beagles".
    I know a guy who was actually banned from there for his Liberal views on licensing.
    I got pretty sick of all the legalese and just stopped going there.

    I just tried running Ghost from its DOS boot floppy with the "Ghost /? > Switches.txt" syntax.
    It did make the text file but it was empty, because Ghost displays its switches from within
    itself, in a graphical mode, and does not pass them off to the text file. Sorry about that!

    So boot up with your Ghost disk and at the DOS prompt type in Ghost /? and press enter.
    Ghost will display its switches.
    If there's a way to get Ghost to print out the switches, I'm not aware of it.

    Good Luck,
    The Doctor
    Experience is truly the best teacher.

    Backup! Backup! Backup! GHOST Rocks!

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