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Thread: ScanReg

  1. #1
    Silver Lounger Duchess843's Avatar
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    Is Scan Reg available for Windows XP Home with SP3? It used to be on my computer some time ago, but not there now. If the answer is yes, where will I find the download file?

    I searched for it on Google, but couldn't find the information.


    One other question: Can programs listed in the Hosts file be safely deleted? Most where put there by a program I no longer use.


    I'll appreciate all answers.

    Thanks,

    Gloria
    <img src=/S/coffeetime.gif border=0 alt=coffeetime width=32 height=48>

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Scanreg is not part of Windows XP - it was a component of Windows 98 and ME, I think.

    The Hosts file doesn't list programs, but websites, as far as I know.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Duchess843 View Post
    Is Scan Reg available for Windows XP Home with SP3?

    Wasn't that for 98 & ME? My brain can't think that far back anymore! I remember it now...neat little tool!!!
    Mike

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    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duchess843 View Post
    Is Scan Reg available for Windows XP Home with SP3?
    Try Nir Sofer's RegScanner utility.


    Quote Originally Posted by Duchess843 View Post
    Can programs listed in the Hosts file be safely deleted? Most were put there by a program I no longer use.
    What you should have in the HOSTS file is simply lists of IP addresses each with a corresponding URL.
    Examples from of old:
    68.178.254.189 wopr.com
    68.178.254.189 www.wopr.com

    Yes, you can get rid of any and all of these if you want - they are only bypassing the usual DNS lookup function.

    But keep
    127.0.0.1 localhost
    !
    BATcher

    Time prevents everything happening all at once...

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    Silver Lounger Duchess843's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BATcher View Post
    Try Nir Sofer's RegScanner utility.



    What you should have in the HOSTS file is simply lists of IP addresses each with a corresponding URL.
    Examples from of old:
    68.178.254.189 wopr.com
    68.178.254.189 www.wopr.com

    Yes, you can get rid of any and all of these if you want - they are only bypassing the usual DNS lookup function.

    But keep
    127.0.0.1 localhost
    !
    Thanks Batcher,

    I already have an excellent Registry Cleaner.

    The fact that I can remove the IP Addresses is good information.

    Also I wish to thank Hans and Mike for their replys. This is what I call good help, ask a question today and get answers within minutes. I belong to many forums, but none are as good as Windows Secrets.

    Merry Chirstmas to one and all and may Santa bring you all you desire.

    Gloria
    <img src=/S/coffeetime.gif border=0 alt=coffeetime width=32 height=48>

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    Plutonium Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by BATcher View Post
    ...
    What you should have in the HOSTS file is simply lists of IP addresses each with a corresponding URL.
    Assistant lounge pedant (networking) here.

    What you have in the HOSTS file is a list of IP addresses, each with a corresponding hostname or fully qualified domain name (FQDN).
    A URL includes a resource type (such as http: or ftp, a FQDN, and possibly other information such as folder, file, and arguments

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    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    Well, if you keep quiet about that, I won't say a word about Gloria thinking that RegScanner was a registry cleaner!
    BATcher

    Time prevents everything happening all at once...

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    Silver Lounger Duchess843's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BATcher View Post
    Well, if you keep quiet about that, I won't say a word about Gloria thinking that RegScanner was a registry cleaner!
    I have something to say. With a name like that (without looking at the program), who wouldn't think it was a registry cleaner. Since I made that mistake, I'll take a look at it and see exactly what it does.

    Thanks for the correction, I have egg on my face and it doesn't do anything for my looks.


    Gloria
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  9. #9
    Silver Lounger Duchess843's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BATcher View Post
    Try Nir Sofer's RegScanner utility.



    What you should have in the HOSTS file is simply lists of IP addresses each with a corresponding URL.
    Examples from of old:
    68.178.254.189 wopr.com
    68.178.254.189 www.wopr.com

    Yes, you can get rid of any and all of these if you want - they are only bypassing the usual DNS lookup function.

    But keep
    127.0.0.1 localhost
    !
    I looked at RegScanner and was pleasantly surprised at what it does. I'm thinking about giving it a whirl, thanks again for suggesting I try it.

    I found Hosts and it was read only which I changed. I got a message that I needed to choose a program to open Hosts, after selecting Notepad the file opened but I don't know how to delete them using Notepad.

    Please post the method I should use.

    Gloria
    <img src=/S/coffeetime.gif border=0 alt=coffeetime width=32 height=48>

  10. #10
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duchess843 View Post
    but I don't know how to delete them using Notepad.
    Select the lines that you want to remove, then either press the Backspace key or the Delete key on the keyboard.

  11. #11
    Silver Lounger Duchess843's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HansV View Post
    Select the lines that you want to remove, then either press the Backspace key or the Delete key on the keyboard.
    Wonderful, thanks for the information. I'll try and remove them using one or the other of your suggestions.
    <img src=/S/coffeetime.gif border=0 alt=coffeetime width=32 height=48>

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    Quote Originally Posted by Duchess843 View Post
    I looked at RegScanner and was pleasantly surprised at what it does. I'm thinking about giving it a whirl, thanks again for suggesting I try it.

    I found Hosts and it was read only which I changed. I got a message that I needed to choose a program to open Hosts, after selecting Notepad the file opened but I don't know how to delete them using Notepad.

    Please post the method I should use.

    Gloria
    Gloria, please don't use RegScanner or any other so-called third-party registry 'cleaner'. Certainly never pay for one. You don't need them - they are unnecessary, often counter-productive, occasionally very dangerous and not worth the price (even the free ones). While the legitimate ones - those that do not contain boatloads of malware and/or adware - are mostly harmless (but even they can be dangerous when used by anyone who is not registry/process/API-IDE savvy) it is a fact that they will do nothing that your Windows system does not already do, all by itself, without help and much more efficiently and safely than any third-party cleaner can do. The bad ones - when they don't contain nasties - will claim to have found 'hundreds' of 'bad registry entries' (which is the equivalent of third-rate security software boastfully claiming to have fixed 'hundreds of malware infestations' when all they've done is murder poor, innocent and harmless cookies) and then, after scaring you, make you pay up before they'll fix those 'problems'. I promise you, you don't need ANY third-party registry cleaners. The 'problems' they were originally needed to fix disappeared with the introduction of Windows XP and now with Vista and Windows 7, all three of which are more than capable - and designed for - fixing themselves. The thing that commercial registry cleaners do best is pick your pocket. Resist.

    On the Hosts file, if you must edit it, open it in Notepad, delete the entries using the normal Notepad editing methods (backspace, highlight-select and delete, etc) and press Control+S (for Save) on the keyboard or choose 'Save' from the File menu.

    It would be useful to know the purpose of the Host file: as others have said, the entries are IP addresses for specific websites, plus text commenting in specific places and formats. The IP address '127.0.0.1' is, in effect, your own machine. So that, any URL in the host file which is pointed at 127.0.0.1 will not leave the machine for the wider network - this is often done to prevent certain applications or processes 'phoning home'. Instead of DNS lookup finding the IP they are trying to connect to out there in the net, they are pointed back at 127.0.0.1 and so the external connection at the application-prescribed IP is never made. In other cases, some malware can 'hijack' the Host file so that when, for example, a security application tries to update, the malware has set it up that that application will go to a bogus address as identified in the IP on the left hand side (as is 127.0.0.1). In yet more cases, it may sometimes be more efficient to setup in the Host file an IP to which a certain application always connects - useful if difficulties are experienced with DNS lookups.

    It is the case that your PC will work just as well as it always does and connect to the web through whatever DNS lookup addresses are set in networking controls or your modem/router if there is nothing at all in your Host file (other than the very first 127.0.0.1 example). Unless you, yourself, put any of those entries in the Host file, I would delete them because whatever did is up to no good. I would then run a very thorough system scan by your security applications (ESET for preference) and keep an eye on the Host file. If entries re-appear without your intervention, and without your security application alerting you, then you have a problem (inefficient security software being part of that problem).

    Good luck,

    Brian De B

  13. #13
    Plutonium Lounger
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    If anyone has different opinions about Registry scanners and cleaners then please review http://bro.ws/768675L

    We really don't want to restart the same discussion in another thread

  14. #14
    Silver Lounger Duchess843's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Me Too View Post
    Gloria, please don't use RegScanner or any other so-called third-party registry 'cleaner'. Certainly never pay for one. You don't need them - they are unnecessary, often counter-productive, occasionally very dangerous and not worth the price (even the free ones). While the legitimate ones - those that do not contain boatloads of malware and/or adware - are mostly harmless (but even they can be dangerous when used by anyone who is not registry/process/API-IDE savvy) it is a fact that they will do nothing that your Windows system does not already do, all by itself, without help and much more efficiently and safely than any third-party cleaner can do. The bad ones - when they don't contain nasties - will claim to have found 'hundreds' of 'bad registry entries' (which is the equivalent of third-rate security software boastfully claiming to have fixed 'hundreds of malware infestations' when all they've done is murder poor, innocent and harmless cookies) and then, after scaring you, make you pay up before they'll fix those 'problems'. I promise you, you don't need ANY third-party registry cleaners. The 'problems' they were originally needed to fix disappeared with the introduction of Windows XP and now with Vista and Windows 7, all three of which are more than capable - and designed for - fixing themselves. The thing that commercial registry cleaners do best is pick your pocket. Resist.

    On the Hosts file, if you must edit it, open it in Notepad, delete the entries using the normal Notepad editing methods (backspace, highlight-select and delete, etc) and press Control+S (for Save) on the keyboard or choose 'Save' from the File menu.

    It would be useful to know the purpose of the Host file: as others have said, the entries are IP addresses for specific websites, plus text commenting in specific places and formats. The IP address '127.0.0.1' is, in effect, your own machine. So that, any URL in the host file which is pointed at 127.0.0.1 will not leave the machine for the wider network - this is often done to prevent certain applications or processes 'phoning home'. Instead of DNS lookup finding the IP they are trying to connect to out there in the net, they are pointed back at 127.0.0.1 and so the external connection at the application-prescribed IP is never made. In other cases, some malware can 'hijack' the Host file so that when, for example, a security application tries to update, the malware has set it up that that application will go to a bogus address as identified in the IP on the left hand side (as is 127.0.0.1). In yet more cases, it may sometimes be more efficient to setup in the Host file an IP to which a certain application always connects - useful if difficulties are experienced with DNS lookups.

    It is the case that your PC will work just as well as it always does and connect to the web through whatever DNS lookup addresses are set in networking controls or your modem/router if there is nothing at all in your Host file (other than the very first 127.0.0.1 example). Unless you, yourself, put any of those entries in the Host file, I would delete them because whatever did is up to no good. I would then run a very thorough system scan by your security applications (ESET for preference) and keep an eye on the Host file. If entries re-appear without your intervention, and without your security application alerting you, then you have a problem (inefficient security software being part of that problem).

    Good luck,

    Brian De B
    Thank you Brian, your posts is one of the very best I've seen. You explained things so clearly and I will take your advice and remove my registry cleaner and not install RegScanner.

    It's going to be a pleasure having you a member of this forum and I look forward to hearing from you again.

    Gloria
    <img src=/S/coffeetime.gif border=0 alt=coffeetime width=32 height=48>

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duchess843 View Post
    Thank you Brian, your posts is one of the very best I've seen. You explained things so clearly and I will take your advice and remove my registry cleaner and not install RegScanner.

    It's going to be a pleasure having you a member of this forum and I look forward to hearing from you again.

    Gloria
    Gloria, that is a lovely thing to write and I thank you very much for it. Here's wishing you (and your Hosts file - heheh) and all you love a safe and wonderful Christmas and New Year season.

    Brian De B

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