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  1. #1
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    I'm a newly arrived Lounge member from Windows Secrets and before that, a LangaList subscriber. Congratulations and thanks, then, to everyone here who was involved in the origination and development of The Lounge.

    I'm a bit reluctant to make a debut post that's so downright novice. But help really would be appreciated. Here's the situation.

    My six-year-old desktop has finally reached its end of days. It runs XP Home. My two year old laptop also runs XP Home. It was difficult enough then, trying to get Dell to provide it with XP as the OS when all Dell seemed to be interested in was flogging Vista. But it's impossible now: Dell is not alone in assiduously pushing out Windows 7. But Windows 7 does not run, nor cannot be made to run, my most used favourite app: Microsoft's Photostory 3. So Windows 7 is of no use to me.

    Fortunately, I've been able to buy a new desktop, with a decent spec, that doesn't have Windows 7. Unfortunately -- for me -- it has Vista (32bit, like my XP).

    From what I've heard of Vista, it's the Nanny State gone mad, stuff about "privileges" and "administrator rights" and Gawd knows what else that's intrusive, disruptive, unnecessary etc etc.

    So my question is. . .

    Can anyone here kindly point me in the direction of some reference resource or other where I can find out how to run Vista in as straightforward a fashion as XP? Or, well, as near as possible to that sublimely simple state.

    My new desktop arrives next week. It will be my first encounter with Vista, so I'd really like to have some insights before booting up for the first time into how best to strip out all Vista's intrusive redundancies.


    Many thanks.

  2. #2
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    You need to turn off Vista's User Acess Control (UAC).

    There is many ways to do it, but here is one of the easiest way...
    Quote from How-To Geek site:
    "Open up Control Panel, and type in “UAC” into the search box. You’ll see a link for “Turn User Account Control (UAC) on or off"

    http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windo...windows-vista/

    -=j=-

  3. #3
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    Welcome to the Lounge.

    There is, of course, Woody's book Windows Vista All-in-One Desk Reference For Dummies and Windows Vista for Dummies by Andy Rathbone that you can preview at this linked page.

    Ther are some tips and tweaks here and a step-by step on how to disable or remove the most annoying "feature" of Vista, User Account Control (UAC) here.

    That should get you started. Once you have a little background info, take a look on the internet for Vista tutorials. A Google search will turn up quite a few. HTH
    <IMG SRC=http://www.wopr.com/w3tuserpics/DocWatson_sig.gif>

  4. #4
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    Gosh, that was quick!

    Sincere thanks to Juhani and Doc for the fast advice and the excellent links.

    Your help is much appreciated!

    NB: I'm not anti-Vista, anti-Microsoft, anti-anything much really, it's just that I've stayed clear of Vista (until now) because XP did everything I needed (or thought I needed) and so much of the stuff on the 'Net seemed to be so critical of Vista that I thought I'd be better off, avoiding the headache.

    Hopefully some aspects of Vista will be superior to XP. When I come to get to grips with it. . .

  5. #5
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    Hi,

    Do not fear Vista! Just as with Win98, Win Xp or Win7 there will always be issues which get resolved over time with service packs and user genius that is shared by all.User memories are very short when stating their current O/S preferences.There are always many iterations that come out. Come of think of it Win2000 was the best..and Win 98Se the final version when all was finally done.
    Many say they prefer WinXP over Vista. Well heck a computer whiz and myself couldn't even get WinXP to run when it first came out but by Service Pack 2 things were great!
    The suggestion to turn off the UAC (User Account Control) was probably the best suggestion so far along with getting hold of Vista for Dummies type help.Make sure you run
    your all programs as Administrator avoiding operating and control problems down the road.Open any program select the "exe" and right click on it. Select the,Compatibility Tab and check off "Run as Administrator" As well if you if you have any problems running older programs you can also select in same area the "Compatibility Mode" and try out the older operating systems format.
    I f you prefer the older look for your new computer you can select the Classic look by right clicking your desktop and selecting "Personalize" choosing any of the 7 major categories to change appearances and sounds.
    I am running Vista Home Premium with 64 bit on my HPdv6 1148ca laptop and can run a 13 year old military strategy game as well as new minted Call of Duty Modern Warfare II game.
    And finally good luck to you.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Revotel View Post
    NB: I'm not anti-Vista, anti-Microsoft, anti-anything much really, it's just that I've stayed clear of Vista (until now) because XP did everything I needed (or thought I needed) and so much of the stuff on the 'Net seemed to be so critical of Vista that I thought I'd be better off, avoiding the headache.
    I suggest that you do not turn off UAC. Instead tone it down with Disable annoying Vista UAC popups with TweakUAC (FREE). UAC dialogs should subside after a short time. Most users see few UAC prompts after the first couple of weeks of use.

    Joe
    Joe

  7. #7
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    Dear Revotel,

    Take heart. I have been using Vista (albeit the Ultimate version) for about 18 months and have had very few problems with it. (Yes, my HP printer software was incompatible, but it still did everything by using the built-in windows drivers for printing, scanning, and faxing.) I also am not bothered when the UAC pops up; I rather like having it keep me safe. I actually prefer my Vista to the XP Pro I use at work. Maybe I'm an outlier. (But not a liar.)

    Enjoy!

  8. #8
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    Do not turn off the UAC as some programs and updates require it to be on.
    Also, I would have gotten a Windows 7 machine, as there are a lot of improvements.

    Now running HP Pavilion a6528p, with Win7 64 Bit OS.

  9. #9
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    To Ian, John, Joe and Dave:

    Muchas gracias! I really am indebted to you -- especially as I wasn't sure my OP was just too daft to be worth anyone's bother.

    Yup, Ian's point about evolving OS's definitely strikes a chord: I hated XP on its first outing, bitterly regretted having abandoned Windows 98. But as time went by and the service packs developed, XP really did come good. Or so it seemed to me.

    Re Vista. I don't want to revive any historic argument that's likely irrelevant now but I stayed away from Vista because I don't need Nanny State welfare: the UAC seemed to me (and still seems) to be a badly thought out interventionist "aid" that might well do more harm than good if ever user fatigue set in where repeated clicking was concerned.

    I am the sole user of my PC, at home, and running paid-for, not free, Avira AV, Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware, and Eset Firewall. Quite why I need some Microsoft blunderbus to fire off warning shots about anything and everything when more precisely targeted software is already doing its job for me, I've no idea. That's why I don't want it: even the notion, in my case, of having to be "an administrator" -- ye Gods, I'm just a home user -- sticks in the craw.

    But I'll put up with it and thanks to all the advice and help given here, I'm now sure that Vista and I will get along fine.

    Though I'll still weep for XP. . . (sob!)

    * Dave: I mentioned earlier, Windows 7 does not and cannot be made to work with one of the greatest products Microsoft never appreciated: its very own Photostory 3. No point in me taking on a new Microsoft OS which wipes out useage of the one Microsoft app from which I derive so much fun.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Revotel View Post
    * Dave: I mentioned earlier, Windows 7 does not and cannot be made to work with one of the greatest products Microsoft never appreciated: its very own Photostory 3. No point in me taking on a new Microsoft OS which wipes out useage of the one Microsoft app from which I derive so much fun.
    If you get Windows 7 Pro, Enterprise, or Ultimate AND the PC supports hardware virtualization you can use the freeWindows XP Mode to run apps which just won't work in Win7.

    Joe
    Joe

  11. #11
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    Joe:

    Thanks for that information: I'll pass it on to fellow members of the Photostory forums. From anecdotal evidence I think most of us are already 'settled' with our PCs; mine was certainly the oldest. As we're all home users, the expense of the Windows 7 PRO version coupled with -- perhaps -- an upgrade of hardware to accommodate virtualization so as to get back to the straightforward state already enjoyed with XP is likely an option that doesn't appeal now. A few years down the line, however, is a different story. So your info is of considerable help. Thanks again.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Revotel View Post
    Thanks for that information: I'll pass it on to fellow members of the Photostory forums. From anecdotal evidence I think most of us are already 'settled' with our PCs; mine was certainly the oldest. As we're all home users, the expense of the Windows 7 PRO version coupled with -- perhaps -- an upgrade of hardware to accommodate virtualization so as to get back to the straightforward state already enjoyed with XP is likely an option that doesn't appeal now. A few years down the line, however, is a different story. So your info is of considerable help. Thanks again.
    You're welcome.

    What is about Photostory that you like so much? There are numerous newer programs around for photo manipulation which are compatible with a Vista or Windows 7.

    Joe
    Joe

  13. #13
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    Unhappy

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeP View Post
    You're welcome.

    What is about Photostory that you like so much? There are numerous newer programs around for photo manipulation which are compatible with a Vista or Windows 7.

    Joe

    Oh dear, don't get me started. . ! Photostory is an orphan child of Microsoft (there may be others, but I don't know of 'em.) It was lovingly developed around the start of the decade and in its final form reflected the era of its genesis, when widescreen didn't exist outside a movie theatre, and burning to DVD for playing on a home TV screen was sci-fi. On which basis, it was obsolescent almost at birth and abandoned not long after. Yet Microsoft could, and should, have stayed with it. Gone commercial with it. Flattened any and every other so-called DVD slideshow creator in the market. But Microsoft didn't. It was (still is) a freebie.

    Photostory brought in Ken Burns Effects pan and zoom for the first time (90% of today's commercial products still don't have it: arguably the best alternative is from ProShow, but it's only the highly expensive top-of-the-range 'Producer', not the cheaper ProShow products, that equals it.)

    But Photostory isn't merely an abandoned child. It was a premature baby, too: the processing power, the memory needed to make it work properly, just wasn't around on the average home computer at the time of its launch. And Microsoft severely under-quoted "system requirements". So those who started then, or followed on later, were stuck with a resource-intensive, fixed 4:3 aspect, unable-to-burn-to-DVD app that really wasn't worth the effort.

    Those who've lived with it over the years, however, know different. It's simple to fool it into making 16:9 'productions'. Easy to get around the weird proprietary codec and output to wmv and then Nero-burn to DVD (and assiduously avoid the time- and money-wasting Sonic plug-in, a Microsoft-approved 'enhancement' to, er, make the product fit for purpose because Microsoft itself had given up on the whole thing.)

    And of course, with today's home PC technology, production doesn't take absolute hours any more because of the need to maximise virtual memory and have the HD accessing in support.

    So almost four years after its final version, and final abandonment, it now runs as it should on XP and Vista -- though not, as noted earlier, on Windows 7 unless in the OS / hardware environment you kindly identified -- and produces an output that's a delight to create, to watch, and to listen to.

    There possibly are new commercial offerings that copy its features: I don't know, I haven't looked. But those I have checked into have been lacking in one area or another. And online reviews by even some of the most respected sites have shown only that although their authors may know a lot about computing, they know sod all about digital image production. And seem to think Ken Burns is a character in The Simpsons.

    Photostory (and its sibling, Moviemaker) are primarily responsible for persuading me that hey: Bill Gates isn't that bad a bloke after all.

    Even though commercially short-sighted. I mean, he might've been rich by now if he'd only appreciated Photostory's potential. . . <g>

  14. #14
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    Have you tried to run it in compatibility mode?
    If you right click the the exe file you can choose to run it in XP or a different version if you would like.

  15. #15
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    hi Pat: sorry about delayed response, but the new vista PC arrived and I've been setting it up and moving stuff off the old XP one.

    Seems like Vista's critics were right about its drawbacks but I've stripped the darn thing back to what I want rather than what Microsoft thinks I want and it's now running as lean and mean as XP did.

    Re compatability: there's no compatability problem with Photostory in Vista. As for Windows 7, I don't know as I don't have it, but I understand from others in the Photostory community that whatever steps they've tried with Windows 7 have not been successful.

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