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  1. #1
    Lounger
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    I have a new 2 TB Fantom external hard drive with both USB 2 and eSata connections. I have purchased, but not yet installed, an eSata card with the corresponding cable. The drive is performing fine with the USB connection. I am running Win 7 Pro (64-bit) and hope I do not have the problem as related by the Western Digital external hard drives with eSata. A friend of mine, who has a lot of experience building, repairing and upgrading PCs, is not at all pleased with his eSata card with his external hard drive (I don't know what brand of external drive he used). According to him the eSata connection to his external hard drive must be made and the power on to the external drive at boot time, otherwise eSata doesn't work. Sounds like a problem with his computer recognizing the eSata drive as reported in the earlie replies on this thread. He also claims that following his procedure markedly slows down boot plus he claims the increased speed of eSata is not markedly superior to a USB connection. It sounds to me that the brand of the external drive and driver(s) may be the culprit. Perhaps the manufacturer has newer or replacement drivers for those external hard drives presenting problems with eSata. I will be installing and trying the eSata approach soon and will let everyone know how I make out. If I have problems, I do have the fallback to USB 2. I have a FireWire port on my PC but the external hard drive I have doesn't support FireWire connection.

    Don P
    Don Plorde

  2. #2
    Star Lounger
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    Your friend's problem isn't the same as what's been reported here. I have seen other systems that have a problem when trying to plug-and-play eSATA drives so that they have to be connected at boot time.

    The Western Digital problem seems to be unique to them.

    Actually USB connected external drives have had quite a few problems reported here.

  3. #3
    Star Lounger
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    Your friend's problem isn't the same as what's been reported here. I have seen other systems that have a problem when trying to plug-and-play eSATA drives so that they have to be connected at boot time.

    The Western Digital problem seems to be unique to them.

    Actually USB connected external drives have had quite a few problems reported here.

  4. #4
    Star Lounger
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    Your friend's problem isn't the same as what's been reported here. I have seen other systems that have a problem when trying to plug-and-play eSATA drives so that they have to be connected at boot time.

    The Western Digital problem seems to be unique to them.

    Actually USB connected external drives have had quite a few problems reported here.

  5. #5
    Star Lounger
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    Your friend's problem isn't the same as what's been reported here. I have seen other systems that have a problem when trying to plug-and-play eSATA drives so that they have to be connected at boot time.

    The Western Digital problem seems to be unique to them.

    Actually USB connected external drives have had quite a few problems reported here.

  6. #6
    Star Lounger
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    Your friend's problem isn't the same as what's been reported here. I have seen other systems that have a problem when trying to plug-and-play eSATA drives so that they have to be connected at boot time.

    The Western Digital problem seems to be unique to them.

    Actually USB connected external drives have had quite a few problems reported here.

  7. #7
    Star Lounger
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    Your friend's problem isn't the same as what's been reported here. I have seen other systems that have a problem when trying to plug-and-play eSATA drives so that they have to be connected at boot time.

    The Western Digital problem seems to be unique to them.

    Actually USB connected external drives have had quite a few problems reported here.

  8. #8
    Star Lounger
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    Your friend's problem isn't the same as what's been reported here. I have seen other systems that have a problem when trying to plug-and-play eSATA drives so that they have to be connected at boot time.

    The Western Digital problem seems to be unique to them.

    Actually USB connected external drives have had quite a few problems reported here.

  9. #9
    Star Lounger
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    Your friend's problem isn't the same as what's been reported here. I have seen other systems that have a problem when trying to plug-and-play eSATA drives so that they have to be connected at boot time.

    The Western Digital problem seems to be unique to them.

    Actually USB connected external drives have had quite a few problems reported here.

  10. #10
    Silver Lounger
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    1. eSATA is considerably faster than USB 2.0; 300 MB/s vs. 60 MB/s.

    2. eSATA in some cases is not "hot swappable", i.e., it must be powered on at the enclosure at bootup. It cannot be disconnected when activated. Think back to how a PS2 device, e.g. a PS2 mouse works or that of a video cable. USB 2.0 is "hot swappable" and therefore can be powered on/off and disconnected without having to turn off the computer.

    3. Although many new branded PCs are including eSATA ports, there are still many machines that don't have them. Thus, this limits the usability of a dedicated eSATA external enclosure, e.g., taking your external HDD to your friend's house to use on his non-eSATA PC.

    4. There are "combo" external enclosures one can buy that have both USB 2.0 and eSATA connections, e.g., Vantec Nexstar and Thermotake, are just a couple of companies that offer these combination enclosures. This gives you the ability to use the drive on virtually any PC.

    So, as you can see, there are advantages and disadvantages to both types. eSATA definitely has the edge of performance where USB 2.0 has as the advantage in versatility.

    I personally have a couple of the "combo" external enclosures with a SATA drive installed. They are both connected via the eSATA cable, which some manufacturers even include along with the add-on port. I leave all my 'puters on 24/7 and thus the "hot swappable" issue is not a consideration for me. If I want to shutdown or remove the eSATA drive from the machine, I simply turn it off, disconnect it and restart the machine. This only requires about one minute of my time which I hardly consider a major inconvenience.
    Jeff
    simul iustus et peccator

  11. #11
    Silver Lounger
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    1. eSATA is considerably faster than USB 2.0; 300 MB/s vs. 60 MB/s.

    2. eSATA in some cases is not "hot swappable", i.e., it must be powered on at the enclosure at bootup. It cannot be disconnected when activated. Think back to how a PS2 device, e.g. a PS2 mouse works or that of a video cable. USB 2.0 is "hot swappable" and therefore can be powered on/off and disconnected without having to turn off the computer.

    3. Although many new branded PCs are including eSATA ports, there are still many machines that don't have them. Thus, this limits the usability of a dedicated eSATA external enclosure, e.g., taking your external HDD to your friend's house to use on his non-eSATA PC.

    4. There are "combo" external enclosures one can buy that have both USB 2.0 and eSATA connections, e.g., Vantec Nexstar and Thermotake, are just a couple of companies that offer these combination enclosures. This gives you the ability to use the drive on virtually any PC.

    So, as you can see, there are advantages and disadvantages to both types. eSATA definitely has the edge of performance where USB 2.0 has as the advantage in versatility.

    I personally have a couple of the "combo" external enclosures with a SATA drive installed. They are both connected via the eSATA cable, which some manufacturers even include along with the add-on port. I leave all my 'puters on 24/7 and thus the "hot swappable" issue is not a consideration for me. If I want to shutdown or remove the eSATA drive from the machine, I simply turn it off, disconnect it and restart the machine. This only requires about one minute of my time which I hardly consider a major inconvenience.
    Jeff
    simul iustus et peccator

  12. #12
    Silver Lounger
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    1. eSATA is considerably faster than USB 2.0; 300 MB/s vs. 60 MB/s.

    2. eSATA in some cases is not "hot swappable", i.e., it must be powered on at the enclosure at bootup. It cannot be disconnected when activated. Think back to how a PS2 device, e.g. a PS2 mouse works or that of a video cable. USB 2.0 is "hot swappable" and therefore can be powered on/off and disconnected without having to turn off the computer.

    3. Although many new branded PCs are including eSATA ports, there are still many machines that don't have them. Thus, this limits the usability of a dedicated eSATA external enclosure, e.g., taking your external HDD to your friend's house to use on his non-eSATA PC.

    4. There are "combo" external enclosures one can buy that have both USB 2.0 and eSATA connections, e.g., Vantec Nexstar and Thermotake, are just a couple of companies that offer these combination enclosures. This gives you the ability to use the drive on virtually any PC.

    So, as you can see, there are advantages and disadvantages to both types. eSATA definitely has the edge of performance where USB 2.0 has as the advantage in versatility.

    I personally have a couple of the "combo" external enclosures with a SATA drive installed. They are both connected via the eSATA cable, which some manufacturers even include along with the add-on port. I leave all my 'puters on 24/7 and thus the "hot swappable" issue is not a consideration for me. If I want to shutdown or remove the eSATA drive from the machine, I simply turn it off, disconnect it and restart the machine. This only requires about one minute of my time which I hardly consider a major inconvenience.
    Jeff
    simul iustus et peccator

  13. #13
    Silver Lounger
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    1. eSATA is considerably faster than USB 2.0; 300 MB/s vs. 60 MB/s.

    2. eSATA in some cases is not "hot swappable", i.e., it must be powered on at the enclosure at bootup. It cannot be disconnected when activated. Think back to how a PS2 device, e.g. a PS2 mouse works or that of a video cable. USB 2.0 is "hot swappable" and therefore can be powered on/off and disconnected without having to turn off the computer.

    3. Although many new branded PCs are including eSATA ports, there are still many machines that don't have them. Thus, this limits the usability of a dedicated eSATA external enclosure, e.g., taking your external HDD to your friend's house to use on his non-eSATA PC.

    4. There are "combo" external enclosures one can buy that have both USB 2.0 and eSATA connections, e.g., Vantec Nexstar and Thermotake, are just a couple of companies that offer these combination enclosures. This gives you the ability to use the drive on virtually any PC.

    So, as you can see, there are advantages and disadvantages to both types. eSATA definitely has the edge of performance where USB 2.0 has as the advantage in versatility.

    I personally have a couple of the "combo" external enclosures with a SATA drive installed. They are both connected via the eSATA cable, which some manufacturers even include along with the add-on port. I leave all my 'puters on 24/7 and thus the "hot swappable" issue is not a consideration for me. If I want to shutdown or remove the eSATA drive from the machine, I simply turn it off, disconnect it and restart the machine. This only requires about one minute of my time which I hardly consider a major inconvenience.
    Jeff
    simul iustus et peccator

  14. #14
    Silver Lounger
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    1. eSATA is considerably faster than USB 2.0; 300 MB/s vs. 60 MB/s.

    2. eSATA in some cases is not "hot swappable", i.e., it must be powered on at the enclosure at bootup. It cannot be disconnected when activated. Think back to how a PS2 device, e.g. a PS2 mouse works or that of a video cable. USB 2.0 is "hot swappable" and therefore can be powered on/off and disconnected without having to turn off the computer.

    3. Although many new branded PCs are including eSATA ports, there are still many machines that don't have them. Thus, this limits the usability of a dedicated eSATA external enclosure, e.g., taking your external HDD to your friend's house to use on his non-eSATA PC.

    4. There are "combo" external enclosures one can buy that have both USB 2.0 and eSATA connections, e.g., Vantec Nexstar and Thermotake, are just a couple of companies that offer these combination enclosures. This gives you the ability to use the drive on virtually any PC.

    So, as you can see, there are advantages and disadvantages to both types. eSATA definitely has the edge of performance where USB 2.0 has as the advantage in versatility.

    I personally have a couple of the "combo" external enclosures with a SATA drive installed. They are both connected via the eSATA cable, which some manufacturers even include along with the add-on port. I leave all my 'puters on 24/7 and thus the "hot swappable" issue is not a consideration for me. If I want to shutdown or remove the eSATA drive from the machine, I simply turn it off, disconnect it and restart the machine. This only requires about one minute of my time which I hardly consider a major inconvenience.
    Jeff
    simul iustus et peccator

  15. #15
    Silver Lounger
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    1. eSATA is considerably faster than USB 2.0; 300 MB/s vs. 60 MB/s.

    2. eSATA in some cases is not "hot swappable", i.e., it must be powered on at the enclosure at bootup. It cannot be disconnected when activated. Think back to how a PS2 device, e.g. a PS2 mouse works or that of a video cable. USB 2.0 is "hot swappable" and therefore can be powered on/off and disconnected without having to turn off the computer.

    3. Although many new branded PCs are including eSATA ports, there are still many machines that don't have them. Thus, this limits the usability of a dedicated eSATA external enclosure, e.g., taking your external HDD to your friend's house to use on his non-eSATA PC.

    4. There are "combo" external enclosures one can buy that have both USB 2.0 and eSATA connections, e.g., Vantec Nexstar and Thermotake, are just a couple of companies that offer these combination enclosures. This gives you the ability to use the drive on virtually any PC.

    So, as you can see, there are advantages and disadvantages to both types. eSATA definitely has the edge of performance where USB 2.0 has as the advantage in versatility.

    I personally have a couple of the "combo" external enclosures with a SATA drive installed. They are both connected via the eSATA cable, which some manufacturers even include along with the add-on port. I leave all my 'puters on 24/7 and thus the "hot swappable" issue is not a consideration for me. If I want to shutdown or remove the eSATA drive from the machine, I simply turn it off, disconnect it and restart the machine. This only requires about one minute of my time which I hardly consider a major inconvenience.
    Jeff
    simul iustus et peccator

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