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Thread: Readyboost

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    Star Lounger
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    I recall reading somewhere that when Windows tests a memory stick to ensure that it meets the minimum speed for Readyboost, it stores the test results in some location. I have a number of SD chips that all meet the requirements of Readyboost but I also use these chips in my camera(s). In many cases the chip does not have a speed rating and besides, I would like to have my own test results for the actual chips that I have.

    Can anyone tell me where Windows stores the information? I have searched the web but all searches that mention Readyboost and speed produce variations on how Readyboost affects system performance.

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    I recall reading somewhere that when Windows tests a memory stick to ensure that it meets the minimum speed for Readyboost, it stores the test results in some location. I have a number of SD chips that all meet the requirements of Readyboost but I also use these chips in my camera(s). In many cases the chip does not have a speed rating and besides, I would like to have my own test results for the actual chips that I have.

    Can anyone tell me where Windows stores the information? I have searched the web but all searches that mention Readyboost and speed produce variations on how Readyboost affects system performance.

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    I recall reading somewhere that when Windows tests a memory stick to ensure that it meets the minimum speed for Readyboost, it stores the test results in some location. I have a number of SD chips that all meet the requirements of Readyboost but I also use these chips in my camera(s). In many cases the chip does not have a speed rating and besides, I would like to have my own test results for the actual chips that I have.

    Can anyone tell me where Windows stores the information? I have searched the web but all searches that mention Readyboost and speed produce variations on how Readyboost affects system performance.

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    I recall reading somewhere that when Windows tests a memory stick to ensure that it meets the minimum speed for Readyboost, it stores the test results in some location. I have a number of SD chips that all meet the requirements of Readyboost but I also use these chips in my camera(s). In many cases the chip does not have a speed rating and besides, I would like to have my own test results for the actual chips that I have.

    Can anyone tell me where Windows stores the information? I have searched the web but all searches that mention Readyboost and speed produce variations on how Readyboost affects system performance.

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    I recall reading somewhere that when Windows tests a memory stick to ensure that it meets the minimum speed for Readyboost, it stores the test results in some location. I have a number of SD chips that all meet the requirements of Readyboost but I also use these chips in my camera(s). In many cases the chip does not have a speed rating and besides, I would like to have my own test results for the actual chips that I have.

    Can anyone tell me where Windows stores the information? I have searched the web but all searches that mention Readyboost and speed produce variations on how Readyboost affects system performance.

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    I recall reading somewhere that when Windows tests a memory stick to ensure that it meets the minimum speed for Readyboost, it stores the test results in some location. I have a number of SD chips that all meet the requirements of Readyboost but I also use these chips in my camera(s). In many cases the chip does not have a speed rating and besides, I would like to have my own test results for the actual chips that I have.

    Can anyone tell me where Windows stores the information? I have searched the web but all searches that mention Readyboost and speed produce variations on how Readyboost affects system performance.

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    I recall reading somewhere that when Windows tests a memory stick to ensure that it meets the minimum speed for Readyboost, it stores the test results in some location. I have a number of SD chips that all meet the requirements of Readyboost but I also use these chips in my camera(s). In many cases the chip does not have a speed rating and besides, I would like to have my own test results for the actual chips that I have.

    Can anyone tell me where Windows stores the information? I have searched the web but all searches that mention Readyboost and speed produce variations on how Readyboost affects system performance.

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    I recall reading somewhere that when Windows tests a memory stick to ensure that it meets the minimum speed for Readyboost, it stores the test results in some location. I have a number of SD chips that all meet the requirements of Readyboost but I also use these chips in my camera(s). In many cases the chip does not have a speed rating and besides, I would like to have my own test results for the actual chips that I have.

    Can anyone tell me where Windows stores the information? I have searched the web but all searches that mention Readyboost and speed produce variations on how Readyboost affects system performance.

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    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chet Copeland View Post
    I recall reading somewhere that when Windows tests a memory stick to ensure that it meets the minimum speed for Readyboost, it stores the test results in some location. I have a number of SD chips that all meet the requirements of Readyboost but I also use these chips in my camera(s). In many cases the chip does not have a speed rating and besides, I would like to have my own test results for the actual chips that I have.

    Can anyone tell me where Windows stores the information? I have searched the web but all searches that mention Readyboost and speed produce variations on how Readyboost affects system performance.
    Hi Chet,

    You can see the logs by going to Control Panel>Administrative Toosl>Event Viewer>Applications and Service Logs>Microsoft>Windows>ReadyBoost>Operational>

    On the right panel click 'find' and type in 'speed' to see the speed test results. You can also look at all the logged ReadyBoost events in 'Operational'.

    Hope this helps. This is the only location I know that stores ReadyBoost test results on your hard drive.

    How much ram do you have on your Windows 7 machine? If you have 3 to 4 GB, I rather doubt ReadyBoost will gain you any real benefit.
    Deadeye81

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    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I agree. Ready Boost was helpful on systems lacking resources, but on a newer system, with the appropriate resources I have read that Ready Boost has no significant benefit in Win 7.
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    First off, thanks very much for the location of the speed record of the Readyboost tests. I want the speed information mostly for a comparison between the SD chips I have because they are used as memory in my cameras and it is useful to know the relative speeds of each of the chips since that determines the speed of shooting. There isn't any other (easy) way to determine the individual values for each chip.

    I don't think I agree regarding the usefulness (or lack thereof) of Readyboost however. As Readyboost, it (the extra memory) is a memory cache for disk IOs and as such relieves main memory from the need to supply memory for this task. In that function, it is as good as additional memory in that it effectively makes more of main memory available. The argument that it provides little benefit in systems with 3 or 4 GB of main memory is comparable to claiming that systems with 3 or 4 GB of main memory would benefit little from more memory (and the ability to use it). If this were true for all, or even most, cases, there would be little benefits to 64 bit systems and the applications that benefit from the larger memory potential.

    I have 3 GB of main memory and the maximum I can install under a 32 bit OS is 4 GB (as is true for just about all systems) and of that maximum, only 3.1 GB can actually be used since the space above that is reserved. That makes it very unattractive to spend the money (any money) on anything above 3 GB. The cost of Readyboost is not only small but, considering the chip would otherwise sit around collecting dust if it weren't employed as Readyboost, it is the most effective use I can put the chip to except when needed while actually taking pictures.

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    My two cents worth! I am using 2GB of Ready Boost with 2GB on board memory (max allowed) and have noticed a significant difference in performance overall, but the one program that I use daily is Adobe Acrobat 9 Pro, and its included LiveCycle, to do forms and such. Now it takes about half of the time it used to to not only start the program, but to switch between the pages to see if the layout is correct.
    Thanks John
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  13. #13
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Again, on a PC with limited resources Ready Boost may help, but if you have a PC with more resources, it won't as much. Basically this is the law of diminishing return. The more native resources the less this will help.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


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