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  1. #1
    Star Lounger
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    I am not a MAC user nor do I have a background supporting them. But I will be conducting a class which covers basic hard drive and PC maintenance on Windows based PCs. Pretty much just simple tasks. Do MACs have the equivalent of the following Windows utilities and processes?

    Disk Defrag
    Disk Cleanup
    Power Settings

    If so, can you guide me to the area where these tasks are run from?

    If they do not exist, can you recommended any "maintenance" tasks for MACs that would be helpful for an end user? Thanks


  2. #2
    New Lounger
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    No need for that, Dave. The only thing you may occasionally want to do is a disk repair (e.g. if your Mac gets slow): Finder>Go>Utilities>Disk Utility.

    But please don't tell your class it's that easy. Far too many people switch to Mac nowadays. Driving a Ferrari is no fun if everybody has one.

  3. #3
    New Lounger
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    Take a look at an app called Onyx. It's the Swiss Army Knife of disk maintenance. It's actually recognised by Apple on their website. Now it's at version 2.1.3. Give it a try and the best thing is, it's free! Hope this helps.

  4. #4
    New Lounger
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    For completeness re: Onyx...

    The description on Apple's site is <here>.

    There's a separate version of Onyx for each release of the OS. The download link on Apple's site is for the Snow Leopard version. For prior releases, see the developer's page <here>.

    A similar popular utility for this is Cocktail, though unlike Onyx this is a $15 shareware app. As with Onyx, there's a separate version for each OS release. The developer's page is <here>.

    For defragging, there's a $30 utility called iDefrag from <Coriolis Systems>. It works fine, but personally I'm not convinced that such a tool is necessary these days, at least not on the Mac.

    (Oh, FWIW, since we're not talking about Media Access Control, there's no need for all caps; "Mac" is fine. :-)

  5. #5
    New Lounger
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    If you purchase an AppleCare Warranty with a Mac (definitely worth it for portables), it will come with a version of TechTool Deluxe. This is good diagnostic software that goes a step beyond Disk Utility in analyzing most hardware and drive problems. A more robust version is available as TechTool Pro.

    Mac professionals should also consider owning a "rescue drive" (USB 2 external device) with a copy of Alsoft's excellent Disk Warrior program. It is designed to rebuild disk directories that have become corrupt due to power failures, improper shutdowns, and other problems. It has saved me and my users a lot of angst --- several times --- over the years.

    Don't forget that there is usually a diagnostic tool that came with your Mac as part of the software installation DVD. Don't lose those discs! They are machine-specific.

    Macs are based upon BSD UNIX, so there are several maintenance programs that will run in the wee hours of the morning by default, if you leave the machine on and let it run them automatically. ONYX, mentioned earlier in this thread, has a GUI that allows mere mortals to run most of them on command. If you're a UNIX whiz, you can access all of these utilities through the command line, but you would already know that...

    You also asked about an equivalent for Power Settings. In the Mac OS X System Preferences dialog, you'll find Energy Saver and Desktop & Screen Saver. These settings interact with each other a bit, and do pretty much the same things as their Windows equivalents.

    If you want a great source of information on all things Macintosh, check out www.macsurfer.com for dozens of links to sites that feature Mac-centric commentaries, help, and vendors.

    A few of my favorite sites are MacFixit, Mac360, MacJury, MacInTouch, MacLife, MacWorld, iFixit, and OWC's eshop.macsales.com .

    When nothing else works, there's always the Genius Bar at the Apple Store. If they can't fix it, they know who can, and can arrange the fix for you. They're great here in Charlotte and I've used them successfully, several times.
    Make the computing world safe for users: Teach a geek to speak meaningfully, in plain language!

  6. #6
    New Lounger
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    I second the nod to <DiskWarrior>.

    One other quick tip: far more important than disk defrag/cleanup is backup. The built-in Time Machine (quick <video tutorial>) is fine for what it is, but for more traditional backups see <SuperDuper> or <Carbon Copy Cloner>. These allow one to get back up and running in no time at all.

  7. #7
    New Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveInPitt View Post
    I am not a MAC user nor do I have a background supporting them. But I will be conducting a class which covers basic hard drive and PC maintenance on Windows based PCs. Pretty much just simple tasks. Do MACs have the equivalent of the following Windows utilities and processes?

    Disk Defrag
    Disk Cleanup
    Power Settings

    If so, can you guide me to the area where these tasks are run from?

    If they do not exist, can you recommended any "maintenance" tasks for MACs that would be helpful for an end user? Thanks

    Hi, Smith Micro sells quite good program that will do the kind of disk clean up you want, called Spring Cleaning.
    I think it is about $30.
    Don't forget that many disk cleanup tasks can be done via the Disk utility under the Utilities menu under Applications.
    Power Settings can be set via the Energy Control Panel under System Preferences under the Apple Menu.
    This of course includes the automatic turning on and turning off of the computer at times that you set.


  8. #8
    New Lounger
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    I would recommend Applejack.
    http://macupdate.com/info.php/id/15667

    It runs in single user mode and is a command line driven application. I would recommend not using "Autopilot" and do each operation manually. I also skip validating preference files for specific users.

    The first two operations will eliminate the need to run "Disk Utility."

    I still run diskwarrior in conjunction with this application.

  9. #9
    New Lounger
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