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  1. #1
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    I just added an internal WD 640 GB hard drive as a slave to the original 500 GB, mainly for backups. In an effort to conserve energy, is there a hardware or software solution to shut down power to the second drive, then restore power when needed? I'm running Vista Home Premium on a 64 bit system.

  2. #2
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    AFAIK you can only power down all drives, not just one.

    cheers, Paul

  3. #3
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    I've got a couple of 1 and 2 TB drives that are "energy efficient-green" drives and they stay as close to a power down
    state as possible as noticed by their temps and the way they respond when first opening files in them after they have
    been dormant for some time. That's probably the best your gonna be able to do unless you get an external and shut it
    off when not in use.

    Go for the green and the green with the largest cach ie 64 MBs. They'll cost you more.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
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  4. #4
    New Lounger
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    Thanks Paul and CLiNT!
    I'd never heard of a way to power one down, but thought I'd ask. The second WD drive is a green one, so maybe I lucked into buying the correct one.

    Lee

  5. #5
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    If you are truly using the second drive just for backups, a better option would be to install it in an external USB housing and only connect it when you are doing backups. That way you won't lose your backups if the PC has a catastrophic power failure or the system picks up a nasty virus that could spread to all attached drives.

    Jerry

  6. #6
    New Lounger
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    Thanks Jerry. That's a possibility I hadn't considered. Do you have any history of doing same?

    Lee

  7. #7
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    External USB drive enclosures can be had for less than $18. ( http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...-005-_-Product ).

    I've been backing up my data to an external USB drive for two years now. Fortunately, I've never needed to recover any data but I do recover a random file as a test periodically just to be sure its working OK. Years ago I backed up some data to a CD without testing the backup before doing a new clean install. When I went to restore the data, I found the CD was corrupted and lost everything.

    Jerry

  8. #8
    New Lounger
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    Jerry:

    YIKES! I can't imagine losing everything. Anyhow, I'm going to look into trying the external route.

    Thanks for your input.

    Lee

  9. #9
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    If you are hardware handy, install a power adapter bracket to the rear of PC on one of the slots. The adapter is just a simple metal L bracket with two to four 4-pin power connectors on it. (Or install two such adapters on two slots.)
    Connect PC power to one of the 4-pin power sockets on the L-bracket adapter. Connect the HDD 4-pin to another on the adapter. Close the PC case.
    Now, external to the PC, use a power cable to short the two sockets. That means power goes to the HDD via the external short.
    Disconnect the external short and the internal HDD is off.
    The more expensive way is use HDD drawer ($20-40).
    Both methods preserve speed (IDE or SATA). It is much better than using USB box ... until you have USB 3.0 on both the PC and the USB box.

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