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  1. #1
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    In XP there is the nice little Repair routine one can run on a NIC adapter connection. What is analogous to doing that in Win7? I can't find anything and have been rebooting when anything network-related is changed or goes awry.

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    I think that the "Diagnose" option does a similar thing. But I have gotten in the habit of disabling then renabling - that reloads the drivers (from what I can tell).

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    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Byron Tarbox View Post
    In XP there is the nice little Repair routine one can run on a NIC adapter connection. What is analogous to doing that in Win7? I can't find anything and have been rebooting when anything network-related is changed or goes awry.
    I found that the repair routine did not always work either and I had to play around for a considerable period of time when my network became unstable with XP. My granddaughter has that PC now and still has problems connecting to a wireless network on a regular basis. I have found far fewer network problems with Win 7. I suspect many of my problems are happening when all my neoghbors networks are interfering with mine during high usage time frames. This problem may be related to my Linksys router as when this happens (every few days) I generally have to reboot the router to solve the problem. I do not believe it has anything to do with Win 7, and much more to do with the network.
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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    I don't see anything in W7 that compares to the "XP repair" button, but these commands still work.

    ipconfig
    ipconfig /release
    ipconfig /renew


    . getmac � this tool will enable you to display the MAC addresses for network adapters on a system. The Media Access Control (MAC) address for the network card can be accessed both on the local computer and on a network.
    2. hostname � not sure about what the name of your machine is on the network? Just type hostname and hit enter.
    3. ipconfig � according to Microsoft's own description, the tool is designed to display by default only the IP address, subnet mask and gateway for each adapter associated with the TCP/IP. But in addition to enumerating the TCP/IP network configuration parameters users can also refresh the DHCP and DNS settings.
    4. nslookup � is meant to be used according to Domain Name System.
    5. net � is a general tool with commands covering a broad range of functionality.
    6. netstat � displays protocol statistics and TCP/IP network connections.
    7. netsh � the command-line tool enables Vista users to both view and alter the network configuration settings of computers.
    8. pathping � is a middle solution which bundles the functionality delivered by traceroute and ping.
    9. nbtstat � a tool that will display protocol statistics and current TCP/IP connections using NetBIOS over TCP/IP.
    10. Ping � a complete description of the ping utility can be found here.
    11. route � manipulates network routing tables.
    12. tracert � users can implement this command-line tool to identify connectivity problems between the local computer and a network address.
    It may well be burried within the troubleshooter/diagnostic function of W7.
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    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

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    5 Star Lounger
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    I found that the repair routine did not always work either and I had to play around for a considerable period of time when my network became unstable with XP. My granddaughter has that PC now and still has problems connecting to a wireless network on a regular basis.
    Once in a great while, one of my systems will return a workgroup not found, check with admin error and a Repair always resets whatever was causing the error and if a repair ever doesn't work, it lets me quickly investigate the connection itself, or DNS setting or IP address settings without having to wonder if its something in the cache or something didn't release correctly somewhere else, so it narrows my toubleshooting scope nice a quick. All I've ever gotten from Win7 so far is diagnosis could not identify any problem--I think its heavily skewed to auto DHCP and DNS diagnosis because I have had it suggest removing my static settings on more than one occasion and of course when I check them they are correct and what I want them to be set at.


    I have found far fewer network problems with Win 7.
    I've found that a fresh 32-bit Win 7 install works pretty much great, at least no worse than XP (comparing wired connections only since I have few wireless and thay are always subject to other external and sometimes very localized influences), but so far any 64-bit Win 7 system (2 so far) I've tried on my 20-some computer, 4 workgroup network has be very disappointing, not discovering all the compters, not being compatible with the dlna NAS drive display as another netoworked place and locking up reboot solid if I clicked on the media device icon where it did show up. In each case, the only thing I did is replace 64-bit with 32-bit and the problem was instantly solved with no further input.

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    Windows 7 networking is a dream compared to Vista. I remember taking my Vista laptop to a conference that featured an internet cafe with wireless LAN. For some reason, it would take Vista about 5 minutes to convince itself that there was a wireless network available, and not just the first time but every single time I tried to connect! Fortunately I had also installed Ubuntu on my laptop - Ubuntu found and connected me to the network within seconds. In a few other situations I was never able to connect to a given wireless network with Vista (and I know of several other poeple who had that exact same problem), but Ubuntu connected me with no problems. And to make it worse, the Network Devices dialog was hidden many levels deep within a series of dialogs (fortunately, Vista allowed you to drag the address bar icon to your desktop which gave me a quick link to the Network Devices dialog).

  7. #7
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    3 out of the 5 PCs I have upgraded to Win 7 are 64 bit. All were able to connect to 3 different networks in 3 different cities, all using 3 different routers and all connected each time without my assistance other than inputing the pass phrase or keywork or whatever they called it. As I said the XP machine is still haveing problems with 2 of these 3 networks. I do not know what your problems may be, as I said earlier, I am stumped, but my experience with Win 7 is just the opposite. I find it much better than XP or Vista.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
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  8. #8
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    My samples are equally small, just 4 32-bit and 2 64-bit, and 64-bit blew chuncks in both cases. It has not been a matter of connecting, that was nominal across the board, its been proper network detection of systems and NAS drives over a multi-switch, multi-workgroup network, and the lockup when I tried to connect to one of the NAS drives as a Media device instead of a network place. I have enough computers to do a proper statistical analysis but, I don't really have the gumption so it'll have to remain an observation for now that there seem to be some compatibility issues yet to be ironed out in 64-bit Win7...or maybe Win7 64-bit won't be "happy" until everything else is 64-bit as well.

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