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  1. #1
    Lounger
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    I'm doing some research prior to possibly buying a new computer later this year. I've come across the following two CPU specifications:

    Code:
    Intel® Pentium®  Processor E5400
    (2.70GHz, 2MB L2 cache, 800MHz FSB)
    Code:
    AMD Athlon™ II X2 Dual-Core Processor 250u
    (1.6GHz, 2MB total cache)
    Should I assume that the second is significantly slower than the first or that the fact that the second is Dual-Core makes up or more than makes up for the smaller number of GHz?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    Hi Bob,

    Generally comparing CPU speeds between Intel and AMD processors is not like comparing apples to apples. Intel and AMD take different approaches in the architecture of their processors. In the case of the two processors you are looking at, the Intel E5400 should outperform the Athlon II. The E5400 is a dual core processor as well.
    Deadeye81

    "We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give." Sir Winston Churchill

  3. #3
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    I use Tom's Hardware site for CPU comparison, but ultimately it's about the money.

    cheers, Paul

  4. #4
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    You can't directly compare different processor designs by the clock rate (GHz). Different designs do different amounts of processing for each clock cycle (Hz), and have different amounts of cache RAM (local very high speed temporary RAM) inside the processor chip itself. Plus other more complex differences.

    As pointed out above, Tom's guides provide good tests of how different processors perform - but these days, almost any modern processor is good enough for everyday tasks. It matters how much RAM you have, how fast the hard drives are, how good the graphics card is, every bit as much as a processor (as well as the overall price of course.)

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