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  1. #1
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    Not sure of the proper section to put this question, so I picked the most general one I could find in which to post it.

    I purchased special software for my business several years ago, and called in for a new key code whenever I upgraded to a new computer. Without the code (a series of numbers and letters), the software defaults to "demo" mode.

    The company will no longer provide a code for me to install it on a new laptop or if the old laptop has a hard drive crash. I am expected instead to purchase the only other option -- a subscription to the software at $140 a month. To put it bluntly, if my drive fails, I am SOL. It's beyond maddening to me to have been put in this position by a large corporation, but there you have it.

    Is there any way to run a key-coded program in a virtual environment? Or does this type of coding tie the application to either the hard drive or the hardware that it's running on?

    Thanks for any ideas!

    Deanna


  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deanna Dean View Post
    I purchased special software for my business several years ago, and called in for a new key code whenever I upgraded to a new computer. Without the code (a series of numbers and letters), the software defaults to "demo" mode.

    The company will no longer provide a code for me to install it on a new laptop or if the old laptop has a hard drive crash. I am expected instead to purchase the only other option -- a subscription to the software at $140 a month. To put it bluntly, if my drive fails, I am SOL. It's beyond maddening to me to have been put in this position by a large corporation, but there you have it.

    Is there any way to run a key-coded program in a virtual environment? Or does this type of coding tie the application to either the hard drive or the hardware that it's running on?
    This appears to be a product activation system similar to what Microsoft uses for Windows activation. You may be able to run the application in a virtualized environment. That would be up to the software vendor to decide. In any event if the activation is tied to hardware you are out of luck. Even in a virtualized environment the guest (i.e. virtualized) operating system has to be know the hardware upon which it is running.

    Joe
    Joe

  3. #3
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    Most things will run in a virtualized environment but the problem is that the initial install is going to appear and function for all intent and purpose as a new install, which would require a new code. There are methods of making an image of a system partition which already contains a working copy of the program and then converting that image to a virtual OS, but again, if the software is tied to hardware for authentication, when it wakes up in the virtualized hardware environment, its not going to be a happy camper.

    If you could get one more last authorization out of the company and installed it in a virtual OS then you could back that up and carry it forward and/or laterally from system to system because you can maintain the virtual environment without any significant change over time.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Byron Tarbox View Post
    Most things will run in a virtualized environment but the problem is that the initial install is going to appear and function for all intent and purpose as a new install, which would require a new code. There are methods of making an image of a system partition which already contains a working copy of the program and then converting that image to a virtual OS, but again, if the software is tied to hardware for authentication, when it wakes up in the virtualized hardware environment, its not going to be a happy camper.

    If you could get one more last authorization out of the company and installed it in a virtual OS then you could back that up and carry it forward and/or laterally from system to system because you can maintain the virtual environment without any significant change over time.
    If the activation code is tied to hardware she'll still have the same problem move a virtual machine to a new physical machine.

    Joe
    Joe

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