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  1. #1
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    I have a friend who has set me a small .exe program, but he had to change the exe extension on the end of the file in order to email it to me.....he replaced the exe with jnk....When I download it to save in a folder I can only choose "all files" or the "jnk extension"......Once I downloaded the file and placed it in a folder, I can rename the file, but I can't get to the file extension to rename it, I want to replace the jnk with exe extension in order for the program to work....any suggestions on how I can get to the extension changed back to exe is appreciated....many thanks, John

  2. #2
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    It is very annoying that the e-mail programs prevent sending .exe files as attachments, but I understand the reason: to prevent malicious activities. I don't understand why you can't rename the extension, maybe the file has a special attribute, right-click on it and select properties to see whether it is read-only or system or hidden. Another solution is to use a service like http://www.mediafire.com which allows upload and download of files. It's free and quite secure as long as the URL to the file is kept confidential.
    This eco-post is made of recycled electrons

  3. #3
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    When you say you can't get to the extension, do you mean that you cannot see the extension ?
    Windows Explorer defaults are c-r-a-p..

    All of the following is based on Windows XP Pro.

    Go to the Tools menu, and go to the General Tab.
    Up near the top, click -
    Use Windows classic folders
    And then click OK

    Then go back to the Tools menu, and choose Folder Options.
    Then click the View menu.
    There is an option -
    Hide extensions for known file types.
    Untick that, then click OK.

    While we are making things more manageable, select a folder on the left that is in your C Directory, then click the View tab. Then click Details.
    Now go back to the Tools menu and choose Folder Options.
    Then click the View tab.
    Then click the button near the top called -
    Apply to All Folders
    Then click OK.

    Now get the focus on the left side of Windows Explorer to the folder where your pesky file is.
    Then SLOWLY click the file name twice.
    (Or, right click it and choose Rename)
    Retype the extension, and press Enter.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnL View Post
    I have a friend who has set me a small .exe program, but he had to change the exe extension on the end of the file in order to email it to me.....he replaced the exe with jnk....When I download it to save in a folder I can only choose "all files" or the "jnk extension"......Once I downloaded the file and placed it in a folder, I can rename the file, but I can't get to the file extension to rename it, I want to replace the jnk with exe extension in order for the program to work....any suggestions on how I can get to the extension changed back to exe is appreciated....many thanks, John
    If you're likely to want to receive .exe files more frequently, you can define a new extension in your registry, e.g. .exx, which you can configure to behave exactly in the same way as the .exe extension.

  5. #5
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    Some e-mail clients don't rely on the extension to block or pass an attached file. Especially Corporate ones. They actually read the Internal File Header and if it's Executable... No Go...


    As for not being able to change a file's extension. I am running Win7 and there are a few places where it simply won't let you do anything without Admin Rights... Some, not even with Admin Rights... (Though, I haven't tried logging into the actual Admin Account.)

    Also, Win7 only highlights the filename when selecting "Rename". You have to use the arrows to navigate past the "dot".

    Try copying the file some where else and then renaming it...


    With so many blocks to the internet at work we have to download stuff at home. What we can't send in an e-mail we upload to my web site and I then send the links to the file(s) to the appropriate persons or myself at work. Then I download from work. Fortunately, my site is a non-profit ans isn't blocked... Yet.

    Mike Sr.


    Original poster might add OS, e-mail client and browser next time...

  6. #6
    New Lounger
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    Why would anyone try to send anyone an Executable file when it's way easier for them to send the link to the website they got it from???

    Then, you can download the file yourself, if you choose to. This is the safest, simplest, and smartest way to share applications.

    So, delete the mystery app, and ask your friend for the link. And then, all will be well.

  7. #7
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    Why not just put it inside a RAR or ZIP folder first and then send it that way.

  8. #8
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    You have some good advice, but also consider the old fashion way, the command prompt.
    The command is

    rename myfile.jnk myfile.exe

    (assuming you are in the directory where the file is located)

  9. #9
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    Well, Elf, you must lead a sheltered life.
    I have cause, many times, to pass .exe files and .otherbannedextensions files around and receive them too.
    It is not always convenient to have to jump through hoops just to get a file across to a colleague.
    Example: Email received (I need a quick utility to run under windows and do xyz. Can you email one to me"
    Me: here it is - I have changed the extn to .jpg to get past the email restrictions. pse rename back to .exe

    That happens often

    Your solution would be to open FTP up, login to a web space, upload my file, send the EMAIL and pass the location to my colleague and then have him go through the trouble of downloading it when all I have to do is attach it to the email.

    Don't think so mate.

    Max



    Quote Originally Posted by The ELfageek View Post
    Why would anyone try to send anyone an Executable file when it's way easier for them to send the link to the website they got it from???

    Then, you can download the file yourself, if you choose to. This is the safest, simplest, and smartest way to share applications.

    So, delete the mystery app, and ask your friend for the link. And then, all will be well.

  10. #10
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    Try http://www.yousendit.com

    Works for me.

  11. #11
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    All I have to do in Windows 7, is right click file, click rename - the file name is highlighted but not the extension. So, just move mouse to end of extension and click. Backspace to remove extension, then type exe. Works for me every time.

  12. #12
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    The problem mentioned but not readily resolved is when your provider or AV service for email strips files with specific extensions. I know I am the one who defined the extension blocks for our company. And simply renaming them will not get past many of the newer filter mechanisms. They inspect both extension as well as the magic word for the file.The magic word is the first portion of the header in bytes describing the file's purpose.
    There are work arounds let's walk through them.
    -Rename the file to .001. - ask recipient to rename upon reciept. Works for simple filters, not for advanced filters
    -Place in a zip file - Ask user to extract. - Zip may be a blocked or quarantined extension thanks to malware use
    -Place in a zip file and rename zip to .001 ask user to rename - Works for simple filters, not for advanced filters
    -Rename the file extension to .001 and place in zip file. Works for simple filters, but not all content inspection filters
    -Rename the file extension to .001 and place in a zip file, rename zip file to .001 Same as previous solution
    -Place the file in a zip file and password protect the zip file. Filters that look at extension content will block

    Sooooo, What is the answer to make sure an executable always makes it past if zip files are allowed?
    Rename the executable to .001 place in a password protected zip file. This will appear as a non-executable thanks to the fact, the content filters cannot go by anything but the extension name.

    This is not perfect, and are added steps. But you have a higher likelihood of the recipient getting the executable.

    Enjoy

    Kiteman
    Lover of kites and odd technology.

  13. #13
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    One case in which you might not be able to send a link is if the file is a custom program. For example, suppose that I write a little C program that you need, and I want you to test it for me, before I publish it? It's much easier to send it directly, via email, than to go to all the trouble to post the program on my Web server (via FTP), work out the URL so that you can download it via HTTP, since my Web server prohibits anonymous FTP, and send you the link.

    Other Renaming Challenges

    Program files are far from the only types that can be challenging to rename. I've had problems with others, including the following.

    • LNK - Desktop Shortcut
    • URL - Internet Shortcut (or Favorite)
    • PIF - Program Information File. (How many of you remember those?) They still exist, for DOS programs. Windows Explorer classifies them as Shortcut to MS-DOS Program.
    I have yet to find a way to force the Windows Explorer to display the real extensions for these types. Just about the only way to rename any of the above types of files is by opening a command prompt in the directory in question, and use the internal rename command.




    David Gray, Chief Wizard
    WizardWrx
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    WizardWrx Web - Technical Articles and Free Software
    You are more important than any technology we may employ.

  14. #14
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    Follow RobCr's advice;
    From within the folder you have downloaded the file to...
    Reset file attributes from within tools-folder options to show all extentions, then rename it to it's original .exe extention.

    1. Make sure you have permissions, [s]see this thread[/s]
    2. Download the file from your email client to, and access it from a real folder, not your Libraries folders.

    There is also a chance that the process of emailing in this way has corrupted the file.
    You may send an executable by using a rar or zip utility, as well as reconfiguring the security parameters in your email client to
    temporarily alow for email extentions.

    If your at work and on a corporate intranet then you have no business doing this in the first place, as it
    undoubtedly attempts to compromises security efforts put in place to prevent this sort of thing.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Gray View Post
    One case in which you might not be able to send a link is if the file is a custom program. For example, suppose that I write a little C program that you need, and I want you to test it for me, before I publish it? It's much easier to send it directly, via email, than to go to all the trouble to post the program on my Web server (via FTP), work out the URL so that you can download it via HTTP, since my Web server prohibits anonymous FTP, and send you the link.

    Other Renaming Challenges

    Program files are far from the only types that can be challenging to rename. I've had problems with others, including the following.

    • LNK - Desktop Shortcut
    • URL - Internet Shortcut (or Favorite)
    • PIF - Program Information File. (How many of you remember those?) They still exist, for DOS programs. Windows Explorer classifies them as Shortcut to MS-DOS Program.
    I have yet to find a way to force the Windows Explorer to display the real extensions for these types. Just about the only way to rename any of the above types of files is by opening a command prompt in the directory in question, and use the internal rename command.
    This is the way in XP Professional to display all extensions; it requires work in the registry. First, backup the registry with ERUNT; then use the Find function to search for each instance of NeverShowExt and delete it. LNK, PIF, et cetera will be displayed. Immediately after I harden my system I do this tweak so that I can see all the extensions, even the ones hidden after unchecking "Hide extensions for known file types." You can find ERUNT here: http://larshederer.homepage.t-online.de/erunt/
    saint satin stain
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