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  1. #1
    2 Star Lounger
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    Over the weekend my custom made computer stopped working. When the main power switch on the pwr supply (OCZ 650W) is turned on, the post code reader comes on, as does the power light on the MB. As soon as the power switch on the case front is turned on, the fans start running and LEDs on the MB come on, then everything shuts down, then comes back on, then shuts down, etc. The computer was working normally right up until it started this.

    I think the pwr supply may have lost its main power output as the mb is not posting and nothing else is getting the time to power up. Has anyone seen similiar behavior, or thinks it might be some thing else? I run the system off a UPS and have plugged directly to wall to isolate that, but don't have a spare pwr supply large enough for this system and would rather not order one until I'm fairly certain that is the problem.

    Thanks for any thoughts...

    Phil

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    Gold Lounger Rebel's Avatar
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    You may want to post this question on the OCZ Forums (you'll probably have to register to post a question).
    John
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  3. #3
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    Hi Phil,

    It sounds like there is a great possibility your power supply has gone bad. If you know a computer techie near you, he might be willing to put a multimeter to your power supply at very little cost to confirm good or bad output voltage.

    If you are comfortable with or have experience going inside your case, there is an inexpensive Antec ATX Power Supply Tester available from different sources. If your PC is still under warranty I would definitely not go inside the case.

    If you are interested in obtaining such a tester, a search on the web should turn up some good buys with prices ranging from $12 to $20. I have one myself and have tested several power supplies and have followed up with a multimeter that confirmed the Antec's accuracy. This link can help you find a purchase site as well as view photos of the tester. If you take a look, note that the Antec ATX12V Power Supply Tester is not the model I am referring to (these are more expensive, but actually give you the voltage readings).
    Deadeye81

    "We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give." Sir Winston Churchill

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    2 Star Lounger
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    Thanks Gerald. Yes, I'm very familiar with inside the case as I built it from the mb up

    I have a DVM but didn't want to look up all the pinouts for what voltage should be where, but may do that if I have time. I wasn't aware that testers specific to computer pwr supplies were available so may look at one of those also. I know Antec makes good stuff as I'm using their P-180b case.

    I could use this as an excuse to build an i7 system though...

    Phil

  5. #5
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Doesn't sound like the PSU to me. What makes you suspect that it is?
    DRIVE IMAGING
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    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
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  6. #6
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    It's possible faulty memory could be the cause. try fitting one stick at a time see if problem shows up which stick is faulty.
    Clive

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    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CLiNT View Post
    Doesn't sound like the PSU to me. What makes you suspect that it is?
    Hi Clint,

    The symptoms described are classic for a faulty power supply. Power supplies on their way out can cause such flaky boot problems and rebooting. Of course, a faulty power supply is not the only cause for such behavior. Failed memory can be the culprit as well. Something as simple as checking all power connections for proper contact in the system could be the source of the problem also. It has been my experience that power problems are a considerable contributor to mayhem in PCs. Even memory that tests as bad can be the result of out of spec voltage supplied to it. If repeated memory tests show the same address(es) on the same stick of ram to be a problem, then it is most likely bad memory. But if testing shows random memory errors in more than one stick, the power supply should be suspect.

    Checking all connections under the hood, testing the power supply for correct voltages and testing the ram are high on the list for the described symptoms, if for no other reason than to eliminate them as the source of the difficulties.
    Deadeye81

    "We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give." Sir Winston Churchill

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    All very good suggestions, I had not considered the ram, mostly for the points that Gerald laid out. I got a new cellphone last night to replace my WinMo Omnia, so was setting that up, but should get back to the computer this week.

    Thanks again for all the help.

    Phil

  9. #9
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Watch and make sure the CPU fan is running as you power up. Most Bios code will shut the computer down if the fan isn't running at rated speed.

    Jerry

  10. #10
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    A classic case of simplify and reboot?

    Disconnect everything from the PS but the motherboard and see what happens. Then try removing expansion cards and see what happens...pretty soon you have a mobo with a single memory stick and CPU.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Witalka View Post
    Watch and make sure the CPU fan is running as you power up. Most Bios code will shut the computer down if the fan isn't running at rated speed.

    Jerry
    The fans aren't getting the chance to get to speed as the "recycle" happens in about 3 seconds. Thats why I can't see what it could be besides the PSU, the time is too short to really hit anything else except a fried mb.

    Good point otherwise.

  12. #12
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    It's too bad you don't have parts to swap out, like a spare PSU.
    But you should be able to tear it down and troubleshoot with actions like reseating the processor, removing
    all but one memory modual, disconnecting the hard drives and graphics card, etc.
    Take out the board, examine it for damage, same with the PSU. It might provide you with a better idea of what is going on.
    How old is your "custom made computer"? more hardware details would be helpfull.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
    EVGA GTX980, Seasonic PLATINUM-1000W PSU, MountainMods U2-UFO Case, and 7 other internal drives.

  13. #13
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    As a followup, a new PSU resolved the problem and we're all happy campers again. I haven't looked at the old one yet to see if anything is obvious, but a 700W OCZ should not have failed in less than 3 years.

    Thanks for all the suggestions and help.

    Phil

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