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  1. #1
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    When I backed up the first two (2) times, it took just over an hour (roughly 31 Gigs). The next time it took 1:30 and the next time 1:53. In that time period (1 mo.) I installed eight (8) Windows updates--period! Why the huge increases in time?? Yesterday, when I backed up, it popped up an 'error' box during the 'validation' process at about two (2) hours. Someone told me that the Seagate HD went to 'sleep' and hence the 'error' box. I'm doing only 'full' backups. I really don't know what to do next or how to get out of this jam. Thanks. jim

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    Is this external drive plugged into a hub or directly into the computer ports?

    Now running HP Pavilion a6528p, with Win7 64 Bit OS.

  3. #3
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    If you are doing an image as opposed to a backup, and you are doing it incrementally, then every time the data is re-arranged it is pretty close to starting from scratch, especially if you defragment the drive. If you have a defragmenter that runs continuously (Diskeeper), then that will strongly affect it. (None of that appears to apply in your case, but assuming it is correct, I thought it might help other readers.)

    You haven't mentioned if your backups are increasing in size (apart from the updates), for as you add data to the drive the whole thing gets bigger.

    Your increase in time really isn't very big, especially since you are validating (which consumes a lot of of time - try it without it for comparison), and the state of your drive and data will matter: if you clean up the junk and perform a defrag before backing up it may go more smoothly. Remember as well that certain types of data are more compressible than others.

    Finally, if you are running Windows 7 and run into a problem with 'something quitting', as you did, I suggest you go into Control Panel, System and Security, Power Options, and select High Performance. (It may not be visible if you haven't used it before.) You can set it back to Balanced (or your preference) when finished with the task at hand.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveA View Post
    Is this external drive plugged into a hub or directly into the computer ports?
    It's plugged directly into computer port

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by peterg View Post
    If you are doing an image as opposed to a backup, and you are doing it incrementally, then every time the data is re-arranged it is pretty close to starting from scratch, especially if you defragment the drive. If you have a defragmenter that runs continuously (Diskeeper), then that will strongly affect it. (None of that appears to apply in your case, but assuming it is correct, I thought it might help other readers.)

    You haven't mentioned if your backups are increasing in size (apart from the updates), for as you add data to the drive the whole thing gets bigger.

    Your increase in time really isn't very big, especially since you are validating (which consumes a lot of of time - try it without it for comparison), and the state of your drive and data will matter: if you clean up the junk and perform a defrag before backing up it may go more smoothly. Remember as well that certain types of data are more compressible than others.

    Finally, if you are running Windows 7 and run into a problem with 'something quitting', as you did, I suggest you go into Control Panel, System and Security, Power Options, and select High Performance. (It may not be visible if you haven't used it before.) You can set it back to Balanced (or your preference) when finished with the task at hand.
    I 'clean' the computer (Malwarebytes, Spybot S&D, CCleaner, etc.)---then run all three (3) levels of Smart Defrag. I am not adding any more data than the updates. My OS is Vista Home Premium, SP-2.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Hazard View Post
    I am not adding any more data than the updates. My OS is Vista Home Premium, SP-2.
    It's quite probable that your System Restore points are adding to the size of the image. I use an imaging program (ShadowProtect), but each time, prior to performing a full backup, I run Disk Cleanup and delete all but the most recent restore point. For example, right now my C:\ disk indicates 185 GB used. After I run Disc Cleanup and remove all but the most recent restore point, disk usage drops to 136 GB.
    John
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    Quote Originally Posted by peterg View Post
    If you are doing an image as opposed to a backup, and you are doing it incrementally, then every time the data is re-arranged it is pretty close to starting from scratch, especially if you defragment the drive. If you have a defragmenter that runs continuously (Diskeeper), then that will strongly affect it. (None of that appears to apply in your case, but assuming it is correct, I thought it might help other readers.)
    This is one thing that I do NOT like about Acronis. I expect incremental backups to be fairly small, but Acronis incremental backups never are - even when I don't use a disk defragmenter.

    I gave up on using Acronis for incremental backups several years ago. I do use Acronis True Image, but I simply do a full image backup every week.
    Rick Groszkiewicz
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    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    I use Acronis version 10,with system restore disabled, and always do a full backup. It takes approx. 7 minutes to do.
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    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Check the size of your full image backups. They are probably getting larger. There is a certain amount of cleanup you can do, but Windows is always adding to such areas as the control sets, the Registry, Windows Side By Side (Win SxS) and in 64-bit editions, Windows On Windows (WoW), among other areas. So the size of the used space on the C:Windows drive would also show some increase, corresponding to the increase in time and size of backups. There's not much, short of a Windows reinstall, that you can do about this. Just clean up as much as you can, and do keep deleting old System Restore Points. 64-bit Vista does expand its disk usage greatly more than 32-bit Vista, if that is relevant.
    -- Bob Primak --

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    Does disk imaging take up as much disk space as does a regular backup? I have Acronis True Image 9.0 and am about to create a disk image in case of emergencies. It will ask for a location to place the image in, and I am wondering if available space will be an issue or that an image files just an image and does not take up as much space as a backup.

    Any help will be greatly appreciated.

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    How to del old system restore points and not get in to trouble?

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    In thread System Restore Joe P explains a procedure to pin the command 'create a restore point' to the taskbar, which is something I have installed and find very useful. The trick I would add to that is to be selective in when you use this manually, as most major changes will create a restore point automatically, and in particular to describe it, especially if everything is working superbly, in which case it is GOLD. That is when you most want a restore point but are unlikely to get one automatically or think to create one manually, because that is the state you are most likely to want to restore the computer to. The same applies to backups: I don't want them to conform to the zodiac or some other time-related thing, I want backups of known good states, so that I can restore a mess to something that I am confident will work.

    While you are looking at settings for System Restore, you will note that you can set the maximum size expressed as a percentage of the size of your drive, so that if you have a 2 Terabyte hard drive and are complaining about the size of your backups increasing...

    As for staying out of trouble, think of the fun of restoring a computer to a state with long-forgotten passwords.

    Acronis 2010 is not Acronis 10, which is two versions earlier. If you are using Acronis 9, you might consider upgrading to 2010 if you qualify for a deal. Pay a few visits to their site, sign up for their forum or update your registered address, and if the floodgates of their sales department open be patient and be very discriminating in viewing what you might otherwise think of as sp*m. You might get a good deal on price, and they sometimes include the Plus Pack free.

  13. #13
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by acufree View Post
    Does disk imaging take up as much disk space as does a regular backup? I have Acronis True Image 9.0 and am about to create a disk image in case of emergencies. It will ask for a location to place the image in, and I am wondering if available space will be an issue or that an image files just an image and does not take up as much space as a backup.

    Any help will be greatly appreciated.
    Quote Originally Posted by acufree View Post
    How to del old system restore points and not get in to trouble?
    First: Disk Images are compressed, so they take less space than "copy/paste" Backups.

    Second: Please update True Image. Version 9 is no longer compatible with Version 2010 (current). Only the past two Acronis versions are file-compatible. That's an Acronis FAQ answer.

    Third: Most of today's external hard drives are hundreds of gigabytes. I backup a 21GB (used space) Windows XP Pro partition into just over 10GB on the external drive, using Normal Compression. Higher compression is available, but it will slow down recovery. The best compression you will get is about 50% vs. the original used space on your Windows Partition (your C: Drive).

    Fourth: Clean up your Windows Partition before making any backups. This is not just to save space, but also to make recovery more stable. CCleaner does a good job of cleaning up most common sources of Windows clutter. CCleaner also has a button under Tools to remove old System Restore Points. I usually create a new manual System Restore Point just before doing my backups, then delete all but the most recent one or two previous Restore Points using CCleaner's tools.

    Finally: I do not do Incremental Backups because they are unreliable and often take up nearly as much space as Full Backups, give or take a couple of Gigabytes. Again, with the massive size of today's external hard drives, and their low prices, I can afford to dedicate an entire drive to backups, and I even back up my external hard drive to a second external hard drive (using Windows Copy/Paste on the Acronis archives -- warning, this can take a long time! -- ). Most people can fit a year's worth of monthly (32-bit) Windows Full Backups onto a 500-GB external drive. Remember, if you create incremental backups, you MUST keep all the increments, as well as the original Full Backup, to get a recovery going. And with large increments, recovery can be slow or even fail.

    About the two-hour time limit: That is not a Seagate issue. It's the Windows Power Management Scheme in your computer. The default is to shut down all hard drives after two hours without user interaction. You can set up a Maintenance Mode which will Never shut down anything, and eliminates the Screen Saver. Also, shut down ALL background processes (mostly, Tray items) when doing backups, to prevent failures. And NEVER perform a backup operation while connected to the Internet! (Turn off the Wireless Radio from its Tray Icon.) My 21-GB Partition backs up in less than twenty minutes. I usually set the Acronis Options to give the backup process High Prioity. This is not the default setting.
    -- Bob Primak --

  14. #14
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    That is all food for thought, but please let us make a distinction between an external network drive and an external USB drive. A second internal hard drive is the best initial destination for a (home) backup if you are trying to save time, and once you have the backup complete you can let it take its own sweet time in transferring it to an external USB drive, if that is what you are using. USB speeds are not network speeds, and a chain is only as strong as, um, I forget.

  15. #15
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peterg View Post
    That is all food for thought, but please let us make a distinction between an external network drive and an external USB drive. A second internal hard drive is the best initial destination for a (home) backup if you are trying to save time, and once you have the backup complete you can let it take its own sweet time in transferring it to an external USB drive, if that is what you are using. USB speeds are not network speeds, and a chain is only as strong as, um, I forget.
    As an initial destination, a second internal drive is probably the quickest and most convenient location for a home user backup, as a Network Drive or Home Server is still a relatively rare luxury. But I have a laptop, and a second internal drive is not feasible, so USB is the next-best, as SATA presents some issues with Acronis. For desktop PCs, I agree with your assessment. Still, my backups take so little time, that I can safely ignore the difference in speed between an internal and an external drive. My backups have seldom failed to Validate correctly.

    And you are right to point out that as a final destination, an external device is strongly recommended. Sometimes the failure of one internal drive can corrupt the other drives inside the PC, but the external drive is left unscathed. Hence, the weakest link in this chain is actually the internal drives.
    -- Bob Primak --

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