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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    I bought a new Dell with Windows 7 pre-installed. Haven't loaded many applications yet. When I turn it off ("Shut Down" button) and turn it back on with the power button, it takes up to 5 minutes to boot up, most of the time displaying a black screen with the cursor. Any thoughts before I try beating my skull against the Dell help folks?

  2. #2
    Star Lounger
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    My suggestion is to go to the system configuration utility and turn off all unnecessary applications. It might not solve your problem, but it will be a step in that direction.

  3. #3
    New Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carroll View Post
    My suggestion is to go to the system configuration utility and turn off all unnecessary applications. It might not solve your problem, but it will be a step in that direction.
    I'll give it a try... maybe I can identify what's slowing things down.

  4. #4
    2 Star Lounger zigzag3143's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spencer Weart View Post
    I bought a new Dell with Windows 7 pre-installed. Haven't loaded many applications yet. When I turn it off ("Shut Down" button) and turn it back on with the power button, it takes up to 5 minutes to boot up, most of the time displaying a black screen with the cursor. Any thoughts before I try beating my skull against the Dell help folks?

    Spencer

    Hi and welcome

    Try booting into safe mode (F8) see if it is faster. If it is you can you msconfig to identify what is slowing it down



    Ken J
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  5. #5
    5 Star Lounger
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    I prefer using autorun from sysinternals to manage my startup applications. It can find and locate lots of apps that msconfig misses.

    One more thought - I usually find that pauses can be caused by network drives, or app that are attempting to access network resources . Such apps will not continue until they get a response or time out. Sometimes installing the latest driver for your NIC can solve the problem. Other times, disabling the app waiting on the network resource is the best bet. (My vote is on some sort of "PC health" app that is trying to connect to Dell's support site.)

  6. #6
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Although the manufacturer's were supposed to be working closely with MS to decrapify, or at least the startup process. It
    would still be prudent to go through your installed programs and remove the junkware with any new OEM purchase.

    Go through your programs and configure them so that they are not needing to start with the os.
    Turn of os functions that you may not need in "Turn Windows features on or off".
    Go through your "Services" configuration menu and disable or set to manual those deemed unneeded.
    Msconfig is still a good place to start. You don't need a sound card's "helper" file starting with the os as an example.
    Process explorer can be of great help in tracking down memory intensive apps and processes.
    Everything the os offers does not need to be turned on and in full throttle; System restore, Remote Connection manager
    to name a few.
    Many newer printers with advanced networking function don't need to have their processes running if your not on a network.
    Windows 7 has many new networking functions that may not need to be running if you don't have a sophisticated networking
    environment up and running.

    Sometimes too you'll catch an OEM try to sell you a computer, I'll use a real life example here;

    This was when Vista first came out:
    A 32 bit Windows Vista laptop with only 512 MB's of installed RAM. I thought this was a pretty funny joke, but it wasn't
    too funny for the the poor [s]sucker[/s] sole who purchased it, couldn't figure out why it was so slow.
    And this was after a year of owning it! *sony VAIO was/is bad for pulling this kind of cheap junky hardware and components*
    I havn't known Dell to pull this sort of garbage, but I havn't owned a Dell in a few years.
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  7. #7
    4 Star Lounger
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    I'd also suggest updating all the firmware and drivers. Just because it is a new computer does not mean that the manufacturer has installed the latest certified drivers: some of the drivers may still be beta or out of date. In fact, having all the latest drivers is most unlikely.

    Terry

  8. #8
    New Lounger
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    Thanks folks. I restarted using msconfig to get to "diagnostic mode" and it booted in a flash, so now I have to go through the startup multiple times, checking and unchecking boxes until I've identified the program(s) that are slowing things down. I'll start by checking half of them and work down the binary tree. I know it's not network, though, 'cause I haven't connected yet...

  9. #9
    5 Star Lounger
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    Ah, but it could very well be an app that wants to get to the network and thus is waiting until it times out (typical timeout is 1 to 3 minutes, it varies by program) - connecting to the network should solve that issue.

  10. #10
    New Lounger
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    Peter: could be. Actually I'm not on a network, I have a home Wi-Fi... but the card didn't work so I don't have internet access yet.

    Now here's the interesting thing: when I boot it in "selective startup" mode with all the startup boxes checked, it boots okay. When I boot it in "normal startup" mode (which you'd think would be the same, eh?) it hangs for several minutes. My guess is that in the "normal" mode, Windows is trying to Phone Home. A solution is not to boot it in "normal" mode until I get a replacement card and internet access... hmmm, or maybe stick with "selective" and avoid the chatter with Redmond, if that's what's happening...?

  11. #11
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    In system config, msconfig, you can change a couple of things in the boot tab to speed things up as well. Select No GUI boot, timeout to something more manageable. I use 3 seconds. Under advanced Options, if you have a duo core or quad core CPU, check Number of Processors and choose the core number in the drop down box. These changes may help to speed thing up somewhat.
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  12. #12
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Some other worthwhile troubleshooting tools worthy of a look at are Autoruns and Process Explorer from SYSiNTERNALS/MS
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
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