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  1. #1
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    Someonen has stolen my E-Mail list and is sending out add's as if I was sending them!
    Please, let me know what to do as my Norten was Not able to remove the problem.

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    If you have do a thorough scan of your system and it is not inected you've done all you can.

    By the time someone harvested your address book and you find out it is too late. You can't stop the bad emails.

    Joe
    Joe

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    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Ruff View Post
    Someonen has stolen my E-Mail list and is sending out add's as if I was sending them!
    The "as if" is the problem: unless your PC has been taken over by remote controllers (please confirm that you are not part of a botnet), or someone has obtained your password and is sending through your mail service (change your password), then the messages are being sent from other PCs through third party mail servers and there's no technical solution to that.

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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Ruff View Post
    Someonen has stolen my E-Mail list and is sending out add's as if I was sending them!
    Please, let me know what to do as my Norten was Not able to remove the problem.
    Warn all of your contacts and change your email address.
    Make sure that your house is in order. If there are any questions as to the reliability/
    stability, if there is any doubts your computer may still be compromised, do a clean install.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
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    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
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  5. #5
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    Hi Paul :

    There are many security programs that are superior to Norton,
    including the FREE Avast Antivirus Home Edition, available at
    http://www.avast.com .

    However, for your specific problem, I recommend you use the FREE
    Version of "SUPERAntiSpyware", available at
    http://www.superantispyware.com .
    For the BEST in what counts in Life :

    http://www.ctftoronto.com

  6. #6
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robin Taylor View Post
    There are many security programs that are superior to Norton, including the FREE Avast Antivirus Home Edition, available at http://www.avast.com .
    Since the original post was ambiguous about which Norton product was used, it is not clear that the free version of Avast could completely replace the existing functionality. Supplemental products may be needed to provide a complete replacement, if desired. The sum of alternative parts may or may not be better than a Norton suite as a whole.

  7. #7
    2 Star Lounger Katz's Avatar
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    What email program are you using?

    Use ZoneAlarm as your firewall, and Malwarebytes for spyware, and you're all set. Scan with MBAM immediately and get back to us as to what was found..
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  8. #8
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RochelleP View Post
    Use ZoneAlarm as your firewall, and Malwarebytes for spyware, and you're all set. Scan with MBAM immediately and get back to us as to what was found..
    Quote Originally Posted by Robin Taylor View Post
    Hi Paul :

    There are many security programs that are superior to Norton,
    including the FREE Avast Antivirus Home Edition, available at
    http://www.avast.com .

    However, for your specific problem, I recommend you use the FREE
    Version of "SUPERAntiSpyware", available at
    http://www.superantispyware.com .
    This type of brand advocacy is irrelevant to the problem here, and is not appreciated.

    What the issue is, is that we want to figure out whether the e-mail account was actually hijacked, or whether its address was "harvested" (or phished) somehow. If the address was not harvested, the e-mail account may have been compromised, and the owner of that account should contact the e-mail provider or close the account and open a new account. Which security program was used on the local computer is probably not an issue, as the e-mail address is already out there, unless it was the actual e-mail account which got hijacked.

    However, do check for any possible keylogger or Trojan Horse on your local computer. Any good antivirus or anti-spyware program will do the trick. Probably scanning with two or more scanners is a good idea. If nothing shows up, report to your e-mail provider what has happened. If they do not find evidence of a hijacked account, there is no technical solution -- you have been phished. Closing the account could stop its address from being used -- eventually. But the e-mails will probably continue to be sent until that e-mail address is no longer valid. Maybe longer.
    -- Bob Primak --

  9. #9
    2 Star Lounger Katz's Avatar
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    It would certainly make a difference what security programs he uses, if he's looking for malware or more specifically a keylogger on his computer. Maximum PC Magazine has just posted the results of independent tests on security software, although the May issue is not yet online. Esecurity Planet has just reported that 1/3 of virus programs have failed a security test.

    We also haven't established if it's webmail or POP3, which would make a difference in who he complains to. . The OP has nor yet said what email program he uses.
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  10. #10
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RochelleP View Post
    It would certainly make a difference what security programs he uses, if he's looking for malware or more specifically a keylogger on his computer. Maximum PC Magazine has just posted the results of independent tests on security software, although the May issue is not yet online. Esecurity Planet has just reported that 1/3 of virus programs have failed a security test.

    We also haven't established if it's webmail or POP3, which would make a difference in who he complains to. . The OP has nor yet said what email program he uses.
    Brand advocacy aside, Esecurity Planet is not an independent AV testing lab. That aside, it really does not matter whether a security product ranks in the top ten or in the top twenty, as long as it passes independent tresting. Unfortunately, even the most successful AV programs miss around 1/3 of all current "in the wild" malware. This does not mean that the programs are no good. Just that with all the new variants being spewed out each day (heck, each hour!) no program can block everything.

    But this thread really is not about a local computer security issue. I still doubt that the e-mail address was keylogged locally. The idea to scan with a good AV program is just a precaution. Most likely, the harvesting took place directly (or indirectly) on line, or else through hacking into the on line (web) e-mail account. It might not even be the user's e-mail account, but the Facebook or e-mail account of someone else who had the user's address in their address book. There is nothing that can be done on the local computer to prevent this sort of thing.

    Whom to complain to, is the on line e-mail provider where the affected e-mail address is located. Only that provider can take the necessary actions to stop the e-mail address from being misused, if even they can do anything about it. Most likely, the e-mail address would need to be changed to something not easily associated with the old e-mail address. I would only do this if my reputation was being damaged by the misuse of my e-mail address, or if I were being accused of sending spam or offensive e-mails through my account.

    Actually, a POP-3 client downloads from the same server as the web mail account uses, so that distinction is irrelevant. The address book in question resides on the web mail server, not locally.
    -- Bob Primak --

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Primak View Post
    The address book in question resides on the web mail server, not locally.
    I am wondering how you can tell the above information from this post. If the OP is using an email client, (such as outlook, outlook express, windows mail, thunderbird) his address book/contact resides on his local machine and he would need to look at a local infection as a possible source.

    If he uses webmail of some sort, his contact list resides on the email server and it is highly unlikely that his PC is the source.

    If he sends out mass email to everyone in his contact list and does not use BCC (blind carbon copy), all the addresses are sent in the clear in the email and ANYBODY on that list who received that email and had a virus infection could be the source.

    If somebody is just sending mail as you, it is probably just that your e-mail address was "harvested" somewhere and there is little you can do about it. (unless they have actually hacked your e-mail account)

    The thing here that indicates a possible infection of the OP's machine is that they are sending to the OP's "e-mail list" . If he uses an email client and all of the people in his contact list get the same email, There is a very good chance his machine is infected.

  12. #12
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RochelleP View Post
    Use ZoneAlarm as your firewall, and Malwarebytes for spyware, and you're all set.
    Not necessarily completely set. The free versions of these two programs combined do not provide a fully functional security solution. Real-time antivirus protection is essential. That can be obtained from a paid ZoneAlarm suite, or from many other sources, including Microsoft in its free Microsoft Security Essentials package.

  13. #13
    2 Star Lounger Katz's Avatar
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    The address book in question resides on the web mail server, not locally.

    I use a POP3 program, Thunderbird qwith Verizxon as my ISP. My address book is in my computer, not on a webmail server. If my address book were stolen, the fault would lie in my own security. But the OP still hasn't stated his/her mail program.



    Not necessarily completely set. The free versions of these two programs combined do not provide a fully functional security solution. Real-time antivirus protection is essential. That can be obtained from a paid ZoneAlarm suite, or from many other sources, including Microsoft in its free Microsoft Security Essentials package.

    The OP said s/he had Norton
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    2 Star Lounger Katz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Primak View Post
    Brand advocacy aside, Esecurity Planet is not an independent AV testing lab.
    You didn't read carefully. Esecurity was quoting tests from Virus Bulletin http://www.virusbtn.com/vb100/archive/2010/04
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  15. #15
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RochelleP View Post
    Not necessarily completely set. The free versions of these two programs combined do not provide a fully functional security solution. Real-time antivirus protection is essential. That can be obtained from a paid ZoneAlarm suite, or from many other sources, including Microsoft in its free Microsoft Security Essentials package.
    The OP said s/he had Norton
    Aha, so Norton + ZoneAlarm + MBAM. Assuming, of course, it is a version of Norton that does not conflict with ZoneAlarm (or vice versa). In responding here, it's a good idea to fully spell out your recommendations and assumptions, since the person you're advising may not have your level of experience.

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