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  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
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    Hi, all. Once again I call on your collective wisdom.

    I have a user with a document comprising one portrait section followed by a landscape section. The portrait section contains 49 footnotes across 16 pages.

    This user wanted to convert the footnotes to endnotes and have them appear at the end of the portrait section (where all of the narrative text is.) They convert alright, but it appears that after Word fills up the last portrait page with endnotes, they flow into the landscape section! And, of course, because it's the "footnote story" (if I may mangle Word's object terminology), it's all but impossible to click in the text area and try to determine how to proceed.

    Any ideas? Surely the Endnote feature isn't only designed for a small number of citations, is it?
    <font face="Comic Sans MS">That's what you do in a herd; you look out for each other!</font face=comic> - Mike

  2. #2
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    Can you post a sample document which demonstrates the problem?

    Gary

  3. #3
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    Here is a "re-draft" of the document; I copied the contents into a new, blank document to make sure I knew exactly what page formatting had taken place. (Nothing but adding a landscape section to the end.) I tried, too, to scrub it to make sure there weren't problems with the usual suspects (styles, numbering, etc.) and I randomized the text (for business reasons, obviously.)

    Sure enough, it still demonstrates the same problem. I copied all the text into the new file with the notes formatted as footnotes, and then converted them to endnotes, and lo and behold... they just spill over into what looks like the footer and the landscape section.

    Any ideas??
    Attached Files Attached Files
    <font face="Comic Sans MS">That's what you do in a herd; you look out for each other!</font face=comic> - Mike

  4. #4
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    Well, that is weird - no idea why it's doing that. My first thought was that the presence of the empty landscape section was somehow confusing Word when it does the convert footnotes to endnotes routine - since endnotes automatically go to the end of the document. But if I test it by putting some dummy text into that landscape section, and then converting the footnotes to endnotes, the same problem results.

    Here is a workaround though: Convert the endnotes back to footnotes. Make a copy of the document. In the original document, delete the landscape section, and then convert the footnotes to endnotes - they will lay out correctly. Then copy the landscape section from the copy document, and paste it back into the original document. It's a few extra steps, but since it only needs to be done once, it shouldn't be a problem to do.

    Let me know if that works in your live document.

    Gary

  5. #5
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    I was able to fix the layout by adding a continuous section break in front of the existing section break and making sure that the added section was formatted in portrait.

    However, I think there is a better way to do your references. What version of Word are you using? Word 2007 has implemented a very impressive Citations and Bibliography toolset which should be used for this type of References section rather than the footnotes/endnotes feature that you are using. Using the proper Citations tools with say the ISO 690 style would give you numbered items in the text with the bibliography positioned wherever you want it.
    Andrew Lockton, Chrysalis Design, Melbourne Australia

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