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  1. #1
    Star Lounger
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    Hi forum members. As my Windows experience index and my event viewer are not working Win7 home premium 64 bit I am wondering if the Repair install in Win7 works as easy as it did in XP SP3. Using the install DVD and not having to reinstall all the drivers and programs? If so, than I think it would not be a problem. Could you advise please. Regards Peter

  2. #2
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Try the simple fixes first before the more invasive ones...

    Check your services console to ensure that the service that operates/uses event viewer is set to automatic.

    You could make a repair disk in Windows 7 by navigating to Control Panel\System and Security\Backup and Restore, and
    choose "Make a System Repair Disk". Try booting and doing a scan or repair.
    The same can be accomplished by booting with your genuine Windows 7 os disk and choosing "repair".

    Another thing to try is the scan now command
    Start > Run > copy and paste in:
    sfc /scannow
    Click 'OK', You may or may not need your os disk.

    The above link is referenced for XP, but the command works perfectly well in any version of Windows 7.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
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  3. #3
    Star Lounger
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    Hi Clint,thank you for the reply. I don't know what starts the event viewer. It is not listed in services. MSC. SFC /scannow did not find anything. Ia m still looking for the repair install option if it is as XP sp3 was.Use the install CD/DVD and repair Windows only not having to re-install any programs or drivers. Regards Peter

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    Star Lounger
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    Have you tried System Restore? There are articles in Win 7 Help that will guide you in repairing or restoring. Look for System Recovery Options.

  5. #5
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    The Win 7 repair install works similarly to the XP version to fix boot problems and some system files. Install and boot from your installation disk, work through the date time windows, then choose repair. I agree that less invasive repairs are more agreeable as first resorts, but the repair should leave everything other than your OS untouched. The System Restore option may help to fix your problem. If you created a System Repair Disk and Image this would be a preferable route. The System Repair Disk includes tools to help fix your system.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


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  6. #6
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    As I understand it, the repair/reinstall routine in Windows 7 works by launching the installation from inside Windows, not booting from the DVD. If you boot from the DVD, it will roll up your existing installation into Windows.old and do a fresh installation.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  7. #7
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Schulze View Post
    Hi Clint,thank you for the reply. I don't know what starts the event viewer. It is not listed in services. MSC. SFC /scannow did not find anything. Ia m still looking for the repair install option if it is as XP sp3 was.Use the install CD/DVD and repair Windows only not having to re-install any programs or drivers. Regards Peter
    Type "services.msc" in the Run box. The event veiwer service will be located under "Windows Event Log" & "Windows Event Collector", make sure they are set to "automatic".
    You can also try launching the event veiwer from msconfig's tools menu,>>"event veiwer".

    The repair option in the Windows 7 os disk or the "created" boot disk is limited to boot repair. There are other tools related to system restore if you have it running, and system image. There is also a command prompt that can be quite usefull.

    It is possible to do an "upgrade" install on your own system. You may loose some personal settings, but you should be able to keep all your programs. There is also a good chance that you could end up preserving "bad" settings as well.
    You'll have to decide whether that is worth doing. I would hold off just yet. look for a simpler "in os" solution to
    your current issue.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
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  8. #8
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    If you boot from the DVD, it will roll up your existing installation into Windows.old and do a fresh installation.
    Sorry, but this is incorrect. It only does this if you choose Install Windows on the 4th screen shown below. I inserted my installation DVD, rebooted, and chose Boot from DVD. Here is the sequesce of events from that point. This was on a Win 7 Ultimate system and DVD, but I believe the Home Premium on my wife's laptop is similar if not identical.

    1st Screen - Windows is loading files (Note that this might take a couple of minutes. My system was less than 1 minute)

    2nd Screen - Starting Windows

    3rd Screen - Language and Preferences

    4th Screen - Windows 7 (3 options are available)
    Option 1 - Install Now (This is the option ro install or reinstall Win 7 from scratch. After this you would choose In Place Upgrade or Custom Install)
    Option 2 - What to know before installing Windows.
    Option 3 - Repair your computer

    Choose Option 3

    5th Screen - System recovery Options, Windows is searching for Windows Installations.

    6th Screen - System Recovery Options (2 options available)
    Option 1 - Use Recovery Tools that can help fix problems starting Windows
    Option 2 - Restor your system using an image you previously made.

    Choose Option 1

    7th Screen - Choose Recovery Tool (5 option presented)
    Option 1 - Startup Repair
    Option 2 - System Restore
    Option 3 - System Image recovery
    Option 4 - Windows memory diagnostics
    Option 5 - Command Prompt

    I would choose System Restore first as this takes a restore point and attempts the repair. Next I would choose Startup Repair. This option reloads system files to allow the system to boot.

    Obviously a recent system image would be the best alternative, but some people do not take the time to make System Repair disks and images. The other methods may help to get you back to a bootable system.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


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  9. #9
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Myers View Post
    Sorry, but this is incorrect. It only does this if you choose Install Windows on the 4th screen shown below.
    5th Screen - System recovery Options, Windows is searching for Windows Installations.

    6th Screen - System Recovery Options (2 options available)
    Option 1 - Use Recovery Tools that can help fix problems starting Windows
    Option 2 - Restor your system using an image you previously made.

    Choose Option 1

    7th Screen - Choose Recovery Tool (5 option presented)
    Option 1 - Startup Repair
    Option 2 - System Restore
    Option 3 - System Image recovery
    Option 4 - Windows memory diagnostics
    Option 5 - Command Prompt

    I would choose System Restore first as this takes a restore point and attempts the repair. Next I would choose Startup Repair. This option reloads system files to allow the system to boot.

    Obviously a recent system image would be the best alternative, but some people do not take the time to make System Repair disks and images. The other methods may help to get you back to a bootable system.
    Startup Repair - examines the BCD stores/boot sector and attempts to repair boot problems. That's all it does. If Windows 7 is already successfully booting, this option essentially does nothing.
    System Restore - is just that, it looks for Restore Points and performs System Restore (if there are no errors in the Restore Point file(s). If the Restore Points are munged, it won't work.
    System Image Recovery - recovers an image made from within Windows, if one has been made.
    Windows Memory Diagnostics - does a fairly thorough examination of installed RAM.
    Command Prompt - is a command prompt with Administrators Group and System permissions. Use with care.

    None of these options will start a repair/reinstall, but in order to perform a repair/reinstall you will be advised to boot into Windows, insert the DVD and run Setup from there.

    Not at all similar to the XP version.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  10. #10
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I was attempting to offer a solution that might help. Using the method I show will be a way to get to a low level system restore. Perhaps this would help. If nothing else it may rule out things as being the culprit. In this writers case because of the items that are not working I would think a reinstall might be in oreder. Note, as bbearren states, a custom reinstall will take your original installation and place it in a folder called windows.old. If the reinstall works to solve your original problem then you can open windows.old and drag all data and preferences into the new installation (i.e. favorites, links, documents, contacts and all other items you feel important to save). Once you have gotten everything that you need, windows.old can be deleted. Unfortunately there may not be a solution better than the reinstall.

    Once you have gotten your system working properly and customized the way you want it, please take the time to create a System Repair disk and image of your system. This may save your booty in the future if disaster strikes again.

    Perhaps, instead of showing how a possible solution may not accomplish it's objective, it may be more productive to suggest a solution to try.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


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  11. #11
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Myers View Post
    Perhaps, instead of showing how a possible solution may not accomplish it's objective, it may be more productive to suggest a solution to try.
    I did offer a possible solution;

    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    As I understand it, the repair/reinstall routine in Windows 7 works by launching the installation from inside Windows, not booting from the DVD. If you boot from the DVD, it will roll up your existing installation into Windows.old and do a fresh installation.
    to which you made objection:

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Myers View Post
    Sorry, but this is incorrect.
    I'm sorry, but it is correct. There is a way to perform a repair/reinstall in Windows 7; boot into Windows, insert the Windows 7 Installation DVD and run Setup from there, click Install, then select Upgrade. From this point onward, it works quite similarly to an XP repair/reinstall, leaving programs and settings intact and repairing the Windows installation. MS suggests backing up your files before you start, and so do I.

    But booting from the DVD, clicking Install, then selecting Upgrade, I received instructions to boot into Windows and run Setup from within Windows. Apparently a repair/reinstall cannot be accomplished booting from the DVD, only a clean install, which will rollup the old installation into Windows.old. And that is the reason I used the phrase, "As I understand it". One can "Upgrade" Windows 7 with Windows 7, which amounts to a repair/reinstall.

    According to Microsoft:

    "Using the Upgrade installation option The Upgrade option keeps your files, settings, and programs from your current version of Windows. To learn more about which versions of Windows can be upgraded to Windows 7, go to Upgrading to Windows 7: frequently asked questions on the Windows website.


    Notes
    • If you use a fingerprint reader or other biometric device to log on to your computer, write down your password before upgrading. You must log on by typing your user name and password the first time that you use Windows 7 after upgrading.
    • Some programs such as Windows Mail and Outlook Express are no longer included in Windows 7. If you used Windows Mail or Outlook Express as your e‑mail program, you'll need to install a new e‑mail program after you finish installing Windows 7 to read your messages or to send and receive e‑mail. For more information about programs you can use, go to Looking for Windows Mail? on the Windows website.

    To install Windows 7 using the Upgrade option
    1. Turn on your computer so that Windows starts normally. (To perform an upgrade, you can't start, or boot, your computer from the Windows 7 installation media.)
    2. After Windows has started, do one of the following:
      • If you downloaded Windows 7, browse to the installation file you downloaded, and then double-click it.
      • If you have a Windows 7 installation disc, insert the disc into your computer. Setup should start automatically. If it doesn't, click the Start button , click Computer, double-click your DVD drive to open the Windows 7 installation disc, and then double-click setup.exe.
      • If you've downloaded Windows 7 installation files onto a USB flash drive, insert the drive into your computer. Setup should start automatically. If it doesn't, click the Start button , click Computer, double-click the drive, and then double-click setup.exe.
    3. On the Install Windows page, click Install now.
    4. On the Get important updates for installation page, we recommend getting the latest updates to help ensure a successful installation and to help protect your computer against security threats. You need an Internet connection to get installation updates.
    5. On the Please read the license terms page, if you accept the license terms, click I accept the license terms, and then click Next.
    6. On the Which type of installation do you want? page, click Upgrade to begin the upgrade. You might see a compatibility report.




    The Which type of installation do you want? page

    7. Follow the instructions to finish installing Windows 7."
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  12. #12
    Star Lounger
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    Thank you all for the replies. The Computer runs just fine. The items that do not work are event viewer, Windows experience index and FixBoot. I have done the startup repairs using the Repair environment etc. The FixMbr works the Rebuid Bcd works the FixBoot does not. It says incorrect parameter. My parameter was " Bootrec /FixBoot " same parameter as used on FixMbr which worked. Please note that the OS is 64 bit.
    So I thought the a repair install would fix all these little problems. Not an upgrade reinstall just a non destroying programs and settings repair install. Like XP.
    The recover from previous would have to be maybe six or eight month ago as the problems have been with me that long. Those dates are not available anymore. I will try to repair install from within Win7 Home Premium 64 bit and the use the install DVD and see what happens.
    The fixboot problem is recent, a third party backup software must have changed the boot settings as now that same soft ware says invalid partition. There was only one partition on C:. However Win7 is happy and runs just fine.Regards Peter

  13. #13
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I'm sorry the discussion took a turn toward the dark side. I do apologize for that. I was attempting to point out there is more than the install option when booting from the Installation disk, and yes there is a means to attempt a repair from wintin Windows itself, which I also utilized at least once. I guess my whole point is that there are several avenues open to the original poster, one of which I mentioned. I his case, because of the type of failure he has, I would think the Custom reinstall would be most appropriate to try to solve the problem and leave all else intact.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


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  14. #14
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    How To Geek shows a way to fix computer problems using MS Fit-It Center. Perhaps this would help.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
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    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  15. #15
    Star Lounger
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    Thank you all again, and thanks to bbearren and Ted . The window repair install would work using the upgrade choice function. I went as far as that when it told me to uninstall the ATI Catalyst drivers and install Manager. I did that. Then went outside and thought for a moment. Decided to leave the existing install alone. The reason is that I had Win7 working as I liked such as it is. I would probably not need the event viewer or the Windows experience index. So I installed the ATI drivers etc again and all is as before.
    My wife told me to go to Rehab and fix my" WAS" ( Windows acquisition syndrome ). Just for information the whole exercise taught me several things thanks to all of you. The different ways to fix Windows are interesting and adventurous. Regards Peter

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