Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    El Jebel, Colorado USA
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Something I've never seen or heard of before cropped up while I exploring my C: drive. Because I have a smallish 40GB (34.4GB formatted) C:, I have to periodically clean it up, dumping temp files, emptying re-cycle bin and uninstalling little used apps. I also delete uninstall folders from C:\Windows with names like $NTUnstallKBxxxx a month or so after patches seem to be problem free.
    On this trip I discovered a new folder C:\assembly containing 480 objects and the column headings in the right pane changed from normal to Assembly Name, Version, Culture, Public Key Token, Processor Architecture. No indication of size or date. These assemblies have names relating to applications on my computer: HP, Intuit, Microsoft and generic names: Policy, presentation, system.
    Further exploring from a hint on another thread on the WS forum I found what appears to be an exact duplicate in C:Windows\assembly. My question is not only what are things which appear to be "not files" Can I delete the new folder or is it a virtual mirror to the original in C:Windows.
    In addition, I noticed a new folder in C:\Windows\ie8 color coded blue. I assume this is the uninstall for ie8. Both of these folders were created 3/25/10 which is the date I finally bit the bullet and installed XP SP3 and ungraded from ie6. Anybody know what are they and can they safely be deleted?
    Thanks
    Capt Lat

  2. #2
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    828
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 38 Times in 34 Posts
    The "assembly" folder is related to .NET. Not sure why it would install things there instead of in c:\windows\assembly.

    You can determine whether the c:\assembly folder is a shortcut to c:\windows\assembly by opening a command prompt and entering:

    dir c:\ /c

    Look at the "assembly" entry in that output, it should tell you if it is a directory or something else.

    As to if that is needed, first check to see how the entries there compare to the entries in c:\windows\assembly. If anything in c:\assembly is not in c:\windows\assembly, keep it. If they are duplicates, you can can delete the directory (move to the Recycle Bin) and see if that has any adverse affect. If it does, go to the Recylce Bin and undelete the directory.

    The c:\windows\ie8 directory is colored blue because it is compressed. Right click on it and check the Properties, under Advanced, there will be a "compress contents" checkbox. Having it compressed is a good thing - the files take up less space on your hard drive. In fact, it would be a good idea if you compressed your documents and other similar folders. In some cases I even compressed Program Files and all of Documents and Settings. Compressing is easy, on the advanced properties dialog just check the "compress contents" box and click OK, and then select the option to compress the folder and all nested folders.

  3. #3
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    El Jebel, Colorado USA
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Thanks Peter for your enlightenment. Regarding the C:\assembly folder, it does not appear from the DIR command from the DOS prompt, so I am more sure that it is a mirror (I don't know the tech term for mirror, virtual folder or something) of the real folder in C:\windows\assembly. But why? Is it coincidence or did XP SP3 create it? Is there any way to get rid of it? My SP3 update went fairly smoothly. The only glitch was disabling on my monitor Pivot software, which re-installed fine.

    Regarding the C:\windows\ie8 folder in "blue", it was compressed, but I felt is was the uninstall info, since all the $NTUninstall... folders have always been colored blue. For the time being I cut it from C:\windows and pasted it on my D: drive, until I feel like it can be deleted. In that process it automagically uncompressed itself.

    Still would appreciate any member who knows how the assembly folder magically mirrors the C:\windows\assembly in Windows Explorer?

  4. #4
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    12,631
    Thanks
    161
    Thanked 936 Times in 856 Posts
    At the price of hds now, it would be very inexpensive to add a much larger hd to your system and I believe you'll be pleased with the resulting increase in capacity to install and run apps.

    Another file that may be consuming large amounts of disk space is the hiberfil.sys file. This grows very quickly when hibernation is enabled. If you do not use hibernation disable it in XP as follows:

    1. Go to Start> Settings> Control Panel.
    2. Select the Power Options Icon
    3. Click on the Hibernation icon
    4. Uncheck Enable Hibernation

    Now that hibernation is disabled you may check the root directory of your hard drive to see if a file named hiberfil.sys exists. If it doesexist, it can be deleted, you may have to restart your computer first. This file can be 3+ GB or larger. On a 40 GB HD, that's a sizeable chunck.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  5. #5
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    828
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 38 Times in 34 Posts
    but I felt is was the uninstall info, since all the $NTUninstall... folders have always been colored blue
    That is because those directories have always been compressed.

    Regarding the C:\assembly folder, it does not appear from the DIR command from the DOS prompt
    Sorry, typo. The command should have been:

    dir c:\ /a

  6. #6
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    El Jebel, Colorado USA
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Ted, thanks for tip. I disabled hibernation and recovered almost 2GB, enough to at least run defrag. I've upgraded several boot HDs and always seem to run into problems transferring the op system.

    Peter, using the /a switch on the DIR, C:\assembly appears on the list as a <DIR>. Switching to the assembly folder, the DIR /a command shows an empty folder. Interesting, the /a switch does not display an attributes table in any list. The /c switch still fails to list the assembly folder at all. Windows Explorer shows assembly properties as a folder, read only, size 227 bytes with 1 file and 0 folders, but the right pane displays 480 files and 1 sub-folder just like the C:\Windows\assembly folder.

    Still curious as to what is going on?

  7. #7
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    12,631
    Thanks
    161
    Thanked 936 Times in 856 Posts
    Here is an article that may help.
    Quote Originally Posted by Latimer Chaplin View Post
    Ted, thanks for tip. I disabled hibernation and recovered almost 2GB, enough to at least run defrag. I've upgraded several boot HDs and always seem to run into problems transferring the op system.

    A google search for transfer os to new hd returned loads of forums about this topic.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •