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  1. #1
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    Hello again, Colleagues All,
    Following reinstallations of Windows XP and Office 2000 (as reported in another thread in the XP forum - many thanks for the responses BTW) I also reinstalled Access 2003 in a separate directory. My reason for having two versions is that, although I use 2003 for my own development stuff, I have clients who use 2000 and (would you believe) 1997. Access 2000 will quite happily convert 1997 files to 2000 for modification and just as happily convert them back again on completion. Access 2003 is much less accommodating. The only issue in the past has been that, if I run one version after running the other, I am prompted to do some reconfiguration off the appropriate CD (which is OK, considering that I do not use 2000 all that often). Since my reinstallation, neither version will run properly.
    When I try to run Access 2000, I get a message pointing out that I have not nominated a database and would I please insert one in the command line. I do use a command line to assert Owner privileges on a client's system so that I can make requested modifications. However, the desktop icon simply runs the executable and I get the same response when I try to run the program manually. When I try to run Access 2003, it asks me every time to go through the configuration process again, after which it simply stops.
    Any advice from you bright sparks out there ??

  2. #2
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    It sounds as though something has been corrupted in your registry settings for both versions of Access. It appears you did them in the right order - 2000 installed first, then 2003, but something has gone wrong somewhere. I'm afraid you may have to wipe the drive and start over. For what it's worth, we do this sort of thing using Virtual PC - that eliminates the reconfiguration each time you use a different version, and if something goes really wrong, you can start over install the version that got clobbered.
    Wendell

  3. #3
    2 Star Lounger
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    Thanks, WendellB,
    I think you are on the right track. I did not need to reformat anything, but I did remove both the Office and the MSAccess and start again. This seems to have sorted out the Registry as regedit did not throw up any references. I have three partitions on my built-in drive. I keep the C: drive only for Windows and those applications such as Adobe who do not have the courtesy to ask me where I would like to place their software. The D; and E: drives I keep for installed applications and data. This is all for reasons of space. The trick with multiple versions of Access (and probably most other products as well) is to make sure that they do not overlap in their control or make other references to associated software. Thus Access 2000 is part of the Office 2000 Suite, but Access 2003 is not and you must be very careful answering the questions which are posed after Windows has noted that you have multiple versions. You must keep Access 2003 absolutely separate and even refuse to have various links put in place to Office and Outlook. I think I was a bit careless with my answers first time around. The different responses from the two programs were also odd, which is why I threw the matter open to the forum. I was much more careful second time around and in addition, I put Office on the D: drive and Access 2003 on the E: drive, just to make sure that they could not even see each other ! Everything seems to be OK now, but I am keeping my fingers crossed !

    Jim

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