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  1. #1
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    I am doing some work with the local fire brigade, instructing the members on the use of the GPS re Bearings & Headings.
    I know my sine, cos and tan functions, using standard tables.
    My questions are:
    How do I use the Scientific calculator in Windows to convert a number to a degree value? I have done it previously but I am in a muddle.
    How do I use the Function attribute in Excel to convert a number to a degree value? The sine function also made no sense to me. I don't want radians.
    In fact I would like to create my own tables in Excel to convert calculated numbers (be they derived from sine, cos, or tan) to a degree value. Perhaps someone would like to post me a worksheet.
    Bruno.

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    WS Lounge VIP sdckapr's Avatar
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    There are 360 degrees in one circle. There are 2*pi radians in circle. Thus
    Degrees = Radians / (2*PI()) *360 or

    Degrees = 180 * Radians / PI()


    Steve

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    Quote Originally Posted by sdckapr View Post
    There are 360 degrees in one circle. There are 2*pi radians in circle. Thus
    Degrees = Radians / (2*PI()) *360 or

    Degrees = 180 * Radians / PI()


    Steve
    Within Excel of course, you can use the formula =DEGREES(A1) to convert A1 in radians into Degrees
    =RADIANS(B1) does the opposite conversion.

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    Dear Steve, I am aware of the radians and the formula posted above - that is not what I am after.
    Please see attachment.
    Say I know two co-ordinates (A & B), that gives me the a distance between the two co-ordinates (AB) and my sine value is 0.853764855 this will equate to 58.6 degrees.
    I can therefore inform the fire fighters to proceed in a Heading of (in this case) 58.6 + 270 degrees = 329 degrees to go from co-ordinate A to co-ordinate B.
    What I would like to know is how to use Windows Scientific calculator to get 58.6 degrees from a calculated value of 0.853764855
    What I also would like to know is how to enter that calculated number (0.853764855) into an Excel worksheet and derive at 58.6 degrees. Like I stated: I have tried the Sine function facility but it made no sense to me.
    Bruno
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Assume your sine value (0.853764855) is a calculation in cell E5.
    Try this formula in some other cell ....
    =DEGREES(ASIN(E5))

    Tim

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    Ripper, thank you very much for that. I hope that I will be on my way using cos and tan values also.
    Bruno.

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    If we can help on cos and tan values, please post some examples as you did with sine.

    Tim

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    Thank you Tim. I used your example to create cos & tan cells. Working with Eastings & Northings, one often obtains negative values. So in effect I still have to sketch a small drawing like the one above to determine the Bearing that the fire fighters have to take, because sometimes the angles are added to the cardinal points and sometimes subtracted from.

    The only other thing I would like to know is how to use Windows Scientific calculator to get 58.6 degrees from a calculated value of 0.853764855
    It annoys me greatly that I have used this program previously but am now not able to make it work for me - I should have kept my slide rule (do they still make them?).
    Bruno with thanks to all who responded.

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    WS Lounge VIP sdckapr's Avatar
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    The conversion is not a radian to degree issue. It is just the arcsine issue (or "inverse sine") [What is the angle whose sine is...]

    Make sure Decimal and Degrees are selected (they seem to be the default)

    Enter the value 0.8537648555 [or calculate 3842/4500.1]

    "Check" the Inv (for Inverse) box

    Press [sin] button

    It will display 58.623....


    Steve

    PS Tim already supplied the Excel answer:
    =DEGREES(ASIN(3842/4500.1))

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    Thank you Steve, this works. I must have forgotten about the inverse box. Please tell me what the box next to it is, the one that states "hyp", as I seem to have forgotten that function also.
    Bruno

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruno View Post
    Working with Eastings & Northings, one often obtains negative values. So in effect I still have to sketch a small drawing like the one above to determine the Bearing that the fire fighters have to take, because sometimes the angles are added to the cardinal points and sometimes subtracted from.
    Have you tried a conditional formula such as (=IF) to add/subtract to/from cardinal point? If not, can you provide a few examples of what you need?

    Tim

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    Dear Tim & others.

    Please see attached file with included commends. Have a look at the muddle of formulae in range I3:K6 if this can be tidyied up a bit to give automatic (correct) answers I would appreciate it.

    Bruno
    Attached Files Attached Files

  14. #14
    WS Lounge VIP sdckapr's Avatar
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    If I understand correctly, it seems to me that the bearing (in degrees) is:
    =180-G5+SIGN(B5)*90

    Steve

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    Nice try Steve. Yes in this case you obtained the correct Bearing.
    However (using the same given worksheet) transpose the Eastings so that cell B2 has a value of 398634 and cell B3 has a value of 400977 and see what your answer is. The answer should in this case be 58.62 degrees.
    You can of course play with transposing the Northings and this should give degree readings of 148.62 or 211.38 depending on your Easings (transposed or otherwise).
    I noticed that you had "sign" (B5) - why not also (or somewhere) "sign" C5?
    Back to the drawing board.
    Bruno

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