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  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
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    Hello everyone. The church I go to wants to implement wifi and I'm not sure whether use g or n routers. A little info for you:

    The church has a pretty large square footage (I don't know how much) so more than one router will be needed to cover the entire building.
    They already have a wired infrastructure so no problems there.

    Picture a long rectangular building. On one end of the building are the administrative offices. Right next to those is the chapel, and then on the other side of the chapel is a large gym. Initially we just want to have wifi on the end of the building with the administrative offices, but they'd also like the signal to reach into the chapel and into a specific room next to the chapel as well.

    What I'm wondering is if the n technology is supposed to push the signal further out than the g technology, possibly making it more accessible to devices from a greater distance. I'm honestly thinking that we may need to use some sort of external antenna or repeater or something. This is where I get lost and need your help. Any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    Choose "N". It should be compatible with "G" & "B" devices. Try a router by itself first. You can always add range boosting equipment unless you already know the distances are too great.

    Joe
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  3. #3
    5 Star Lounger
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    You can always add range boosting equipment unless you already know the distances are too great.
    I hope Joe doesn't mind if I disagree a little with him here....

    I would not use range boosting equipment. You will need to figure out how many AP's (access points) you need to cover the area. You can cause yourself just as much trouble by going with too many as you would by going with too few.

    I would us a corporate grade AP for this especially if you are going to have clients roaming inside the facility with devices that are logged in. (If the devices stay stationary once they are logged in it is not as critical) expect to pay at least $350 for a decent corporate grade device.

    figure out how many devices you need to cover the facility... this is difficult and can be done by trial and error or by doing a wireless survey.

    give all the APs the SAME ssid and if you are using encryption, give them all the same encryption type and the same passkey.

    set them to non-overlapping channels if possible. In the US only channels 1, 6 and 11 are totally non overlapping.

    When you are done, if your coverage is good, your access points are quality, and your settings are correct, you can take a laptop and connect to the network. You can then walk all over the facility and the laptop will "hand off" the connection to whichever access point has the best signal and will never drop the connection

    And back to your original question, definitely go with N, It is back wards compatible with almost all devices and should be supported into the foreseeable future.

  4. #4
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    My router is a dual-N band device (Linksys WRT610N). It works with both 2.4 GHz and 5 GHZ ranges. I have to believe corporate grade devices would be available for dual-N band as well.
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    5 Star Lounger
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    My router is a dual-N band device (Linksys WRT610N). It works with both 2.4 GHz and 5 GHZ ranges. I have to believe corporate grade devices would be available for dual-N band as well.
    I personally would not bother with the 5ghz band in this case. While the 5ghz band is less congested and less likely to have interference with other devices, you will get less range in non-line-of-site applications (where there are walls, etc. between you and the access point) as the higher frequency is more likely to be blocked by obstructions. Also while most of those devices are duel band, they are not dual radio so cannot transmit both bands at the same time. If you would choose to run the 5ghz band you would not have backwards compatibility with many devices.

    5ghz is great in an apartment complex where you have a small area to cover and many (neighbor's) access points competing for the same radio spectrum.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    Why not use a single Homeplug fed from the router to transfer the signals along the mains wiring, and Homeplug Wireless Access Points in each room?
    BATcher

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BATcher View Post
    Why not use a single Homeplug fed from the router to transfer the signals along the mains wiring, and Homeplug Wireless Access Points in each room?
    Is that powerline Ethernet or something like that (I can't remember what it's called)?

  8. #8
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by telecomguy9 View Post
    Is that powerline Ethernet or something like that (I can't remember what it's called)?
    It's called Homeplug! (And yes, it's ethernet over mains power).

    Because of poor wireless signals from the downstairs front-right-hand corner of my house to the upstairs back left-hand-corner I put in 85 Mbps (nominal!) homeplugs about three years ago, and forgot about them - they just kept on working - until one failed. I've taken advantage of upgrading to 200 Mbps (again nominal!) homeplugs, one with Wireless-N WAP, for playing with laptops. The upstairs one is now a clever combination of a 6-socket mains extension with 3 ethernet sockets. The former link is what you may be interested in for each room (where necessary), but you'll have to sort out SSIDs and channels... From the router to the mains socket you'd probably use one of these.

    Apologies that all the examples are the UK 13A 230V three-pin plugs, but the equivalent will be available in your locale!
    BATcher

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