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  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger
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    I have 2 partitions, one for Windows 7 and my Program Files. My other partiton has almost all my data over there. What I would like to be able to do so as to completely separate my programs and my data is to move the "ProgramData" folder and the "Users" folder (with its sub-folders of Administrator, Default, Dick, and Public) off of C:\

    Nothing I've tried enables me to do that. Has anyone done this, who could help me out with this task?

    Thanks in advance,
    Dick

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    See if this article explains how to do what you are attempting to do.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


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  3. #3
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    You can only move the special folders in a user profile not the whole profile or user database folder. That's because there are system folders and files in there as well that Windows has to expect the location to be at all times. Its actually a good thing since a discontinuous connection for any system folders/files (such as that accross a drive or partition) is an extremely weak potential link in the stability of Windows.

    Conversely, the loss of data folder continuity is not a risk to the Windows operating environment itself, so just moving the special folders within the user profile that can be moved is the way to go, and you don't even have to do that if you're a fan of libraries in Windows 7.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dick-Y View Post
    I have 2 partitions, one for Windows 7 and my Program Files. My other partiton has almost all my data over there. What I would like to be able to do so as to completely separate my programs and my data is to move the "ProgramData" folder and the "Users" folder (with its sub-folders of Administrator, Default, Dick, and Public) off of C:\

    Nothing I've tried enables me to do that. Has anyone done this, who could help me out with this task?

    Thanks in advance,
    Dick
    Have you tried Set 7 Free? If so, did you follow all the steps?

    I have Windows 7 (just the OS) on one drive, Program Files on another drive, Users (and all its subfolders), ProgramData and Winsxs on still another drive using the procedures I outlined in Set 7 Free. My Windows 7 partition is 12GB.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  5. #5
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Byron Tarbox View Post
    You can only move the special folders in a user profile not the whole profile or user database folder. That's because there are system folders and files in there as well that Windows has to expect the location to be at all times. Its actually a good thing since a discontinuous connection for any system folders/files (such as that accross a drive or partition) is an extremely weak potential link in the stability of Windows.
    Actually, Windows can be carved up in any number of ways and still remain stable and reliable (if not more so). The procedures do require an understanding of the underlying structures and what is actually going on, a bit of registry editing, and multiple steps are required. And Microsoft does not support such a setup.

    But it can, indeed, be done.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  6. #6
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    See if this article explains how to do what you are attempting to do.
    Interesting article, but I had to go halfway down a very long list of comments to find a post that indicated it actually worked for them correctly in all respects. It might work but it looks assuredly to be more fragile, less stable and less flexible.

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    5 Star Lounger
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    Have you tried Set 7 Free? If so, did you follow all the steps?
    Also looks very interesting, like a pet project for a spare millenium or two lying around. But seriously, in-depth articles like that really help illustrate the why where and whats of Microsoft's methodical madness. They have to try and make it work for 2 billion people without getting 1.99 billion support requests!!

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    5 Star Lounger
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    Actually, Windows can be carved up in any number of ways and still remain stable and reliable (if not more so).
    That I don't believe, at least for the average user, or even for the average advanced user. You're setting up a discontinuous superstructure that spans partitons, possibly even drives, and without meticulous care for the intricacies to enable and maintain that for which Windows was never designed to do; well your failure points are multiple and in the case of loss of system continuity, drastic (although to be fair, though it may only be a single partition that fails, it may often cause the whole drive to fail, though I do have several drives with just certain areas mapped off as "bad" that are still in use). Now I understand why you take such great care with your imaging maintenance; you can't be lax with a system set up that way, and am I right that its only one or two or a few systems you maintain like that?

  9. #9
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Byron Tarbox View Post
    Also looks very interesting, like a pet project for a spare millenium or two lying around. But seriously, in-depth articles like that really help illustrate the why where and whats of Microsoft's methodical madness. They have to try and make it work for 2 billion people without getting 1.99 billion support requests!!
    Did you read the part where I said that Microsoft does not support the setup? I even put it in bold...

    A product designed for two billion people may not quite be setup exactly as I would like it. So, since I do know how to set it up the way I want it, and since I can support it myself without Microsoft's help, I like to do it my way.

    For folks like Dick-Y who would also like to have things work more in keeping with his own way of looking at things, I publish some of my methods. No they aren't simple, but they don't quite require a millennium to setup.

    And what such articles illustrate is that not everyone wants to try to fit into the "one-size-fits-all" way of doing things.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  10. #10
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Byron Tarbox View Post
    Also looks very interesting, like a pet project for a spare millenium or two lying around. But seriously, in-depth articles like that really help illustrate the why where and whats of Microsoft's methodical madness. They have to try and make it work for 2 billion people without getting 1.99 billion support requests!!
    I agree, MS has to make Windows work for the masses and as such can not make it too easy to fudge with it because they would indeed be flooded with support requests. Generally the things people are trying to do in these forums are not for the masses, they are for folks that do like to fudge with their OS. These same folks make images because they do fudge with their OS to such an extent that their OS becomes unuseable and need to be rebuilt. And yes, sometimes the procudures needed are not easy and sometimes take a lot of extra fudging, but that's what makes this fun.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


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  11. #11
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    Thanks for all the replies. I'm a home user, retired, whose hobbies are tweaking and finance/investing. I'm not a PC expert (although I go back to the days of wireboards at an insurance company in Boston.) However. I certainly dont see myself as lumped in with 2 billion people.

    I'm going to try to apply BBearren's technique to my situation, for the fun of it and for the learning opportunity. I'll report back later how I make out.

    Dick

    PS,
    For what it's worth (2 cents), I think W7 is a major step forward; however, I also think it's still carrying forward a serious design flaw from the early days when all we had was the C:\ drive. All data should be easily separated from programs, and that especially means Windows itself. I dont mean to start an argument. Some people like "plain vanilla"; some like a banana split. Also, my perspective would surely change if I were supporting multiple machines. In my mainframe days as a systems programmer, and then as a Tech. Services manager, I learned right away that "plain vanilla" was the way to go. In fact, I got my first promotion into management when the previous manager allowed some yahoo to "wing it" with a change to the OS, and brought the Gillette Safety Razor company to it's knees for about 7 hours. But I digress . . .

  12. #12
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Byron Tarbox View Post
    That I don't believe, at least for the average user, or even for the average advanced user.
    Quoting from my introduction to my procedures,

    "This is not for the inexperienced, nor for the intermediate-level user. For that reason I am intentially leaving out the more basic steps in preparing your system for this setup; if you don't know how to get there from here, you're probably not ready for this. These procedures will break some things in Windows 7, so you will also need to be prepared to deal with that. Read through these instructions very carefully, and print them for reference. If you're confused by any of the instructions, don't attempt the procedures. If you're unfamiliar with the way junctions work, don't attempt the procedures. If you're uncomfortable working in the system registry, don't attempt the procedures. Don't attempt this if you don't fully understand what is being done, and where, and why."


    From your posts, I would suggest that you aren't ready for it, either. You and I may also have a difference of opinion on what constitutes an "Advanced" user.

    Quote Originally Posted by Byron Tarbox View Post
    You're setting up a discontinuous superstructure that spans partitons, possibly even drives, and without meticulous care for the intricacies to enable and maintain that for which Windows was never designed to do; well your failure points are multiple and in the case of loss of system continuity, drastic (although to be fair, though it may only be a single partition that fails, it may often cause the whole drive to fail, though I do have several drives with just certain areas mapped off as "bad" that are still in use).
    Like I said, you're probably not ready, either. I've been carving up Windows since 95 OSR2.

    Different processes traverse Junction Points in different ways, but most Windows processes traverse them with ease and transparency. As for being meticulous about my backup regimen, I have never been satisfied with any backup software that I have ever auditioned. There is absolutely nothing that I have seen or tried that beats drive imaging for complete reliability, and that is the primary reason I use it and advocate it.

    All you need to do is count the posts that are asking for help because this or that or the other backup system has failed. It has been decades since I have relied on any backup software from any vendor. Drive imaging hits my sweet spot, I test it often, and it has never failed me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Byron Tarbox View Post
    ...am I right that its only one or two or a few systems you maintain like that?
    I maintain my own systems, and help with a few more, but judging from my email, I'm far from alone. Seems like there are a number of folks who like to chop Windows up and reassemble it to suit their own particular needs. And I'm more than happy to help anyone else who has a desire to improve their own system toward their own needs and desires.

    I also have no doubt that you wouldn't believe how stable and reliable my systems are.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  13. #13
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    All you need to do is count the posts that are asking for help because this or that or the other backup system has failed. It has been decades since I have relied on any backup software from any vendor. Drive imaging hits my sweet spot, I test it often, and it has never failed me.
    Amen! I image almost monthly on our 2 main PC's using a 1 TB Seagate Ext drive. (The desktop is almost never turned on any more so I'm not too good at imaging it.) For backups of data, I do this manually. I back up my data to the wife's and our desktop PC. This is accomplished over the network by opening Windows Explorer in both PC's and dragging any data to be backed up to the other 2. Same for her data. My data does not need to have continuous backups or daily back ups or such so I do it when the urge hits me, usually no longer than weekly. Our Quicken financial data is backed up each 2 times it is opened using the same procedure outlined above. This process gives me the original data plus 2 backups of everything on 3 seperate PC's. I also do an end of year back up to all 3 PC's and Zip disks.

    The disaster backups are the images.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


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  14. #14
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    Many many years ago I also decided I did not want my documents in the default MS locations. I created my own data folder on a different drive or partition (depending on the system at the time) and changed all the default data locations for the programs I used such as MS Office and Eudora email. Having everything I could find or think of in my own chosen location made it much easier to backup just my data and gave me less of a problem when I had to reinstall windows and it would wipe out the old Documents and Settings folder. In that respect, at least the new user data locations are good since they do not get wiped out when reinstalling. At least that has been my experience, and as a mostly retired computer support person, I have fixed, rebuilt, and recovered a lot of systems for a variety of users.

  15. #15
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Nealand View Post
    In that respect, at least the new user data locations are good since they do not get wiped out when reinstalling.
    I much prefer not to have to reinstall.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

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