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  1. #1
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    I'm thinking about purchasing Wi-Fire. Does it really improve signal, increase access distance?

    I'm in a guest cabin about 100 yards from the main lodge where a Linksys g router is located. There are log and frame walls between us, plus a row of pine trees. I've got a laptop with builtin wi-fi, plus I've got a Linksys wireless-N WPC300N adapter for my laptop's card slot. Right now I can only rarely access the internet and my signal is very low and it invariably disconnects me. What do you think, will the Wi-fire solve my problems? Is this the route you'd go for use in the cabin? How about around town? Will this help me connect to public wifi? Or is there somethin better for me? Thanks!

  2. #2
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    You can read some user reviews of WI Fire at:
    http://www.amazon.com/Wi-Fire-High-G...owViewpoints=1

    I see that Microcenter carries it. If you have a store nearby, they will accept returns with no question so you could try it and bring it back if it doesn't solve your problem.

    Jerry

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    If Wi-fire does not meet your expectations, you could purchase a Wireless N router since you already have an N adapter for your laptop. The greatest practical difference between G and N is the increased range output with N. The extra speed in N would only be noticeable among your own home network machines.

    You mentioned your laptop has a built in wireless G card. Have you disabled it since adding the wireless N adapter card to your laptop? It may be conflicting with the wireless N adapter.

    Since you are using a laptop, try it inside the main lodge where the router is located to see if you get better connectivity. If you do not obtain better connectivity there, I would rule out range as the problem, and wi-fire would not be the solution.
    Deadeye81

    "We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give." Sir Winston Churchill

  4. #4
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    Thanks for your suggestions. My laptop does work good in the main lodge where the router is. I've decided, I am going to buy my friends in the lodge a new Linksys n router for a present. If I do decide to go with an antennae, what basic specs should I look for, considering the pine trees and the 100 yd. distance between the guest cabin and the lodge? The Wi-fire sounds good, but maybe there are other antennae that would help even more. I appreciate your help!

  5. #5
    5 Star Lounger
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    I would go with this unit. You will need to run a cable to the outside of the lodge wherever you mount it and it will be directional. (it will only help the cabins that are somewhat in line with it on your side of the lodge.) It is inexpensive and has very good range in most settings. Getting it outside of the lodge will get all wall interference out of the picture. Those pines you mention are a problem though. I have seen a single row of thick cedars completely kill a signal. If you have to shoot directly through the thick part of the foliage, it may be difficult to get a good signal.

  6. #6
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    I appreciate all your advice and suggestions, but still I'm confused. I wish I knew more about wifi and networking so that I'd feel confident about purchasing a antennae or booster for this system and I wish I had a lot more money so I wouldn't be concerned with the costs, but I don't. I'm trying to digest all this but am still confused as to what to purchase.

    One thing that confuses me is that the Wi-Fire Wi-Fire does not mention N protocol in its specs. So I wonder if this is the right device to go with my friend's Linksys WRT320N router WRT320N and the Linksys WPC300N notebook adapter to get the best possible signal I can from the main cabin (where the router is) 100 yards and through the row of pines.

    Mercyh suggested the Nano Station Loco Nano Station from Ubiquiti Networks. I don't see that it mentions N protocol in their description. What exactly does this one do in lay terms?

    Thanks a lot for your patience.

  7. #7
    5 Star Lounger
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    nanostation does not include N protocol. If you are only connecting to internet, you do not need N speed. Without line of site it is unlikely that you would be able to maintain an N speed connection anyway. If you are moving large files between you and the main lodge or are running programs on a server located in the lodge, the speed may become an issue.


    nanostation is basically a higher power 802.11B/G wireless access point and an 8db gain directional antenna packaged in a small, exterior rated, box. It is an inexpensive way to push wireless access to a remote location or to bridge a network into another location using two of the devices. (in this configuration they can get up to 6 miles of range if the have unobstructed line of site.)

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