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Thread: PSE & NAS

  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    I have recently moved my PSE catalogue(approx 8,000 images) to NAS.
    This enables me to access it from both my old WinXP system, and my new W7 system.
    My problem is that with the data now all on the NAS, using PSE is dreadfully slow in comparison with when the data was all on the WinXP unit.
    The NAS is by Synology (DS210j), with 2 WD 500Gb disks inside.
    The router is Netgear DG834G v2.
    Is there anything I might do to speed things up to 'normal' ?

    Vaughan

  2. #2
    5 Star Lounger
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    Are you running wireless or wired? Running wired will speed things up tremendously. Beyond that, you might have to upgrade to a Gigabit router, but for that you will need a gigabit NIC on your computer (fortunately the Synology device has a gigabit NIC.)

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    Most consumer-level NAS devices have one thing in common, they are slow. Even a gigabit wired NAS. They are getting better as time goes on and NAS units get a little trickle-down processing power that faster commercial NAS devices have (the ones that start at a few thousand dollars). I have ones from D-Link, Buffalo and Iomega and I get mid-range USB2.0 speeds out of them on average. I see one review of your Synology device on geek.com measured 12.8 MB/s transfer speed. I get a little faster than that on mine (excluding the D-Link which is older and about 1/3 that speed) but its definitely in the ballpark.

    If you are using a 10/100 router, a gigabit router should help take the cap off if you're only seeing in the 9-10 MB/s transfer speed. Hooking the NAS up directly to a PC will speed things up considerably but also complicate configuration and defeat the purpose of a NAS in the sense of its useage...but it will speed up. It doesn't sound like you are using the USB ports on the NAS (if it has any), but if so, don't use them for day to day I/O because the write speeds on a USB drive attached to a NAS is usually really slow.

    The solution I came up with is to keep a copy of everything in three locations (on both PCs and the NAS) so I can always keep the workflow local for intensive I/O operations like database managers that have to maintain a catalogue. Then each night, first one computer, then the other runs a staggered syncronization with the NAS (I use Syncback) in which updated and new files get moved both ways and without any deletions. That way all changes made, regardless of where they were made are reflected in in all three copies so I can work from any station or with any of the 3 sources knowing it all gets updated every 24 hours (can be set to any frequency desired of course).

    The advantages are that no speed is sacrificed, comforting redundancy, can work from any station (even from one where the data is not local, just have to be a bit more patient with the NAS), and automatic syncronization. The only disadvantage I know of is that when one wants some data deleted, it has to be deleted from all three locations before any subsequent syncronizaion or the files will just populate again from the other source(s).

  4. #4
    New Lounger
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    Thanks guys - I am running wired - but it looks like the Netgear DG834G will have to go -'cos its not gigabyte. The motherboard and the NAS both support gigabyte speed, so its definitely worth an update.

  5. #5
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    Update...
    I installed a gigabyte router (Netgear DGN3500), with wired connections.
    PSE is till imposssible to use when the pix / catalogue are on the NAS.

    Looks like Byron's advice is the way to go - very disappointing:-(

  6. #6
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    Consumer grade NAS is still hideously slow and in my opinion is only good for holding backups done in the dead of night. A cheap but much faster option is to pick up a refurb P4 machine for $130.00, stick a large drive in it, share the drive on the network, and keep your network as-is. Use that drive to do real work with. 100 meg networking is still faster than 4 computers can pass data simultaneously anyway, unless you have more than 4 or 5 computers on it passing huge files all at once. I used to run a network of 16 computers in an office environment with a 100 meg network and the highest usage ever was 76% and those jokers were passing movie files all over the place. Once I convinced corporate to let me ban all the filesharing of bootleg movies and music, it rarely went over 30%.

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