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Thread: Event 11

  1. #1
    Star Lounger
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    One of my systems had a data drive failure. OnTrack has it in their cleanroom and has been unable to read any data, yet. There was no clicking or squeeling prior to failure. It suddenly wasn't recognized in the BIOS. A spare drive plugged into the same SATA port, was. The boot drive works.

    I started looking in the event logs to see if there was any early warnings that the drive was failing. I found numerous Event 11 errors. The descriptions were The driver detected a controller error on\ Device\Harddisk2\ DR2 or...DR3, DR4, DR5. I'm continuing to see the same errors even after taking out the dead drive. I can't find anything that even hints at what the DR#'s point to.

    With the continuing event errors, I ran the win 7 memory test, which found no problems. I ran Hardware Monitor which showed the CPU VCORE voltage from 1.16 to 1.41 and the ATX +3.30V from 1.72 to 3.3. The +5V from 4.97 to 5.1, the +12V from 11.98 to 12.24,

    This is an Intel D945GTP board with an Intel Pentium D 940 Dual Core Socket LGA775, 3gig RAM. Internal SATA drive, IDE DVD RW, External USB drive.

    Does this look like the board failing or the PSU failing, or both?
    Don
    Windows 10 64bit, Intel Core i5-490K 3.5GHz, Intel HD Graphics, 8GBRAM, 350GB SSD

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    Hi Don,

    There are three eSpec number Pentium D940 processors that I know of. They are as follows:

    eSpec Number SL95W 65 nm process Thermal design power of 95 W VID Voltage range 1.225V - 1.312V

    eSpec Number SL94Q 65 nm process Thermal design power of 130 W VID Voltage range 1.25V - 1.4V

    eSpec Number SL8WQ 65 nm process Thermal design power of 130 W VID Voltage range 1.25V - 1.4V

    The eSpec Numbers are located on the physical processor itself. I do not know if the Hardware Monitor readings are accurate; if they are, the low end of the
    Monitor report seems a little on the low side for any of the three processors. If you have the SL95W your high reading looks a little too high, but you probably
    have either the SL94Q or the SL8WQ.


    For ATX motherboards:

    The Loose Tolerance Min - Max for +3.3V is 2.97 & 3.63V ------ The Tight Tolerance Min - Max is 3.135V & 3.465V

    The Loose Tolerance Min - Max for +-5.0V is 4.5 & 5.4V ------ The Tight Tolerance Min - Max is 4.75V & 5.25V

    The Loose Tolerance Min - Max for +-12.0V is 10.8V & 12.9V ------ The Tight Tolerance Min - Max is 11.4V & 12.6V

    Your Min 3.30V reported (at 1.72V) by Hardware Monitor is well below the loose or tight tolerance Min.

    Your Min - Max 5.0V reported by Hardware Monitor is within both loose and tight tolerances.

    Your Min - Max 12.0V reported by Hardware Monitor is within both loose and tight tolerances.

    It would be better to obtain several readings on all voltages with a digital voltage meter to confirm your actual voltages before deciding your power supply may actually be supplying too low a voltage.

    The 3.30 V connections commonly power (motherboard) chipsets, some DIMMS, PCI/AGP/PCIe cards, and miscellaneous chips.
    Deadeye81

    "We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give." Sir Winston Churchill

  3. #3
    Star Lounger
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    I was able to dig out the box for the processor. It shows 1.3V max on the barcode label, which would make it a SL95W. I just ran Everest Pro's stress test and came up with some interesting numbers. Everything was pretty nominal with no load. But after a few minutes under the stress test, some of the voltages took a dive. Here's what I ended up with:
    CPU Core 1.17 to 1.41, 1.22 avg
    +3.3V 3.28 to 3.3, 3.29 avg
    +5V 5.03 to 5.1, 5.09 avg
    +12 7.44 to 12.06 11.91 avg

    With the steep sag in +12 which happened about the same time as the CPU Core sag, It sure looks like the PSU can't keep up with the power demand. The big unknown is whether those and earlier sags damaged MOBO components. With the continuing controller errors in the Event log, I'm inclined to think that it did. This is a key system for graphic design for our small business, so I think it wise to bite the bullet and at least replace the MOBO and PSU. I'd like to recycle some things, but stability is important.
    Don
    Windows 10 64bit, Intel Core i5-490K 3.5GHz, Intel HD Graphics, 8GBRAM, 350GB SSD

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    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    Don, if you do indeed have an SL95W, then the CPU voltage also spiked as high as 1.41, above the 1.3 max. And the 12V drop to 7.44 is very steep. The averages you listed do not look that bad, but the dips coupled with the controller errors in the Event Log are difficult to dismiss.

    When you resolve things, please post back your results for the benefit of others who may have this issue in the future.
    Deadeye81

    "We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give." Sir Winston Churchill

  5. #5
    Star Lounger
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    Today I replaced the PSU. It was an Antec SU-380 that must have come in the case. It just looks undersized. Reading the label carefully, it's no wonder there was a huge sag in the 12 volt and instability in the others. I put in a Corsair TX650W and the voltages have only tiny variations during the full stress test. There have been no controller errors in the event viewer since it was replaced. So, I think I can conclude that the undersized PSU was the problem. With the drive motors pulling from the 12V, I don't doubt that the 12V sags rendered the data drive unreadable. I can just imagine how the speed must have fluctuated.

    Thanks for being a sounding board. It got me looking in the right direction.
    Don
    Windows 10 64bit, Intel Core i5-490K 3.5GHz, Intel HD Graphics, 8GBRAM, 350GB SSD

  6. #6
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting back with your resolution Don!
    Deadeye81

    "We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give." Sir Winston Churchill

  7. #7
    Star Lounger
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    A quick followup to my followup... I chatted with OnTrack. The drive suffered a media corruption. The voltage swings apparently caused the spindle speed to vary so much that the heads lost where they were and overwrote the tracks that are needed by the controller. Usually they can restore those tracks and recover some data, but the heads were writing so randomly that the data was unrecoverable.

    I guess, I can't rely on the noisy drive syndrome as a early warning anymore!
    Don
    Windows 10 64bit, Intel Core i5-490K 3.5GHz, Intel HD Graphics, 8GBRAM, 350GB SSD

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