Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Riverview, Florida, USA
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I recently installed Windows 7 Home Premium-64 bits on a new SATA hard drive on my Dell computer which already had a SATA hard drive with Vista 32 bits. I was able to configure the Windows 7 drive as drive C and the Vista drive as drive D and moving my DVD/CD drives as E and F. Everything appears to be working OK and I get the option of booting from either Windows 7 or Vista. However, when I boot to the Vista drive it shows its drive letter as "C" and the Windows 7 drive as "L". Is there a way to correct this and get a more consistent configuration for these drives as C and D?

    Also, would upgrading the Vista hard drive to Windows 7- 32 bits creat/help the above situation in any way?

    Thanks for your help.

  2. #2
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    South of the North Pole
    Posts
    919
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Yes and no to the first. You could probably do it in Disk management by changing the drive letter of whatever is D when booted into Vista and then change the L drive to D and then change whatever the original D drive was to L or something else, or even leave it as it is. The problem is you could really muck things up doing this if there are programs installed that are expecting certain things to be in certain places designated by drive letter--all of a sudden they will be pointing at the wrong place and nothing in them will work correctly. That said, I've shifted drive letters around many time but I know when I can do it and when it will cause trouble.

    Personally I would leave it alone, it is functioning as designed, when booted into Vista, that partition is the OS and designated the C: drive and when booted into Windows 7, that partition is the OS and designated the C: drive and the other inactive OS drive is just a data drive and letters get assigned accordingly, there's nothing incorrect about it.

    If you do an in place upgrade to Win7 you will still have all the pointers to other places from installed programs and Window settings, but if you do a clean install to that partition, you will have much greater flexibility allowed to change drive letters at that time because the install is new and applications are absent so connections won't be severed by changing drive letters. Also with a clean install, the installation itself will probably rearrange the lettering at least to some degree.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    2,654
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 113 Times in 97 Posts
    Hi Eugene and welcome to the Lounge!

    As Byron said, what you are seeing is by design for dual booting the two operating systems, and is best left alone.

    The one thing you can do without causing yourself trouble with your installations is to right click each one of your drives and rename them something that is less confusing to you. I dual boot XP and Windows 7. They were showing as drive (C and drive (D. I renamed them "XPIntrex" and "Win7Pro" so now I see XPIntrex (C and Win7Pro (D when I boot to the XP partition. Likewise, when I boot to the Windows 7 partition, I see Win7Pro (C and XPIntrex (D.

    Renaming the drives in Explorer is a great aid to always know which partition you are currently in without having to worry about the drive letter. It also helps eliminate confusion when viewing the drives in Disk Management and similar software.

    Hope this helps.
    Deadeye81

    "We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give." Sir Winston Churchill

  4. #4
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    12,631
    Thanks
    161
    Thanked 936 Times in 856 Posts
    Hi Eugene, and welcome to the Lounge. As usual Gerald beat me to the punch. I will add just one thought. The OS you are actually booted in (Win 7 or Vista) will usually be listed as "C" drive, that is the active OS is "C". As far as the rest, Gerald's answer is very appropriate.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  5. #5
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Renton, Washington, USA
    Posts
    12,560
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Ted, you may be in error.

    I have dual booted may a machine and have only used the Windows boot manager and the drive letter of the active OS was always the drive letter that I had it installed on.

    The only time I had the C drive for every OS, was when I tried out a third party boot manager.

    When I was beta testing Windows 7 on a old XP machine , XP was on C and Windows 7 on D as installed.

    I have beta tested many a Windows version including Service Packs and all have worked for me, as described above.

    Now running HP Pavilion a6528p, with Win7 64 Bit OS.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    2,654
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 113 Times in 97 Posts
    Makes sense, Dave. I made the assumption that Eugene was using a third party boot manager such as EasyBCD 2.0 Beta, which is what I use and what we described is the norm for that one.

    So Eugene could solve his issue using the native Windows boot manager. Good to know!
    Deadeye81

    "We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give." Sir Winston Churchill

  7. #7
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Riverview, Florida, USA
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Hi Byron, Ted, Gerald and DaveA,

    Thank you for your prompt responses. I have been working on this issue for about 5 days. My research did not leave me with much clarity, but your input have been helpful. I felt comfortable making the changes on the new hard drive with the Windows 7-64bits since there weren't many new programs on it yet. I consulted with the Lounge after I changed the DVD/CD drives from D-E to E-F in order to make the second hard drive "D" on this new drive. But, when I booted on the Vista drive nothing changed. Thus, it is clear that since I have two separate/individual hard drive each has its own OS booting and the hardware lettering is different and "C" is dominant. The recommendation to rename the drive letters make good sense and I will do so. I am not using a third party software with this issue. I read about EasyBCD and downloaded it, but was afraid to use it. Didn't want to create more problems than I could handle. The only issue I am now having with this drive is that I can't send e-mail messages. I get them but can't reply to them. But I will resolve that with my provider.

    I am more tentative with the second hard drive (my original drive) with Vista-32bits. This is the drive which has all my programs on it. Thus, my hesitation to make major changes at this time. Would installing Windows 7-32bits on this drive be a good move at this time. I did run Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor and the report listed only a few programs with issues.

    OK, thank you guys so much. It helped a lot.

  8. #8
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    South of the North Pole
    Posts
    919
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I have dual booted may a machine and have only used the Windows boot manager and the drive letter of the active OS was always the drive letter that I had it installed on.

    The only time I had the C drive for every OS, was when I tried out a third party boot manager.

    When I was beta testing Windows 7 on a old XP machine , XP was on C and Windows 7 on D as installed.

    I have beta tested many a Windows version including Service Packs and all have worked for me, as described above.
    I have almost always used the native or "most recent" boot manager and I have some that work this way and some that don't. XP was all over the map and I'm not sure what the criteria was or is for determining the assignments. Most of my Win7 dual boot installs have been consistently C: assignment to the booted system drive. In fact I have only one notable exception where the Win7 drive remains the F: drive regardless of which OS I'm booted to. Again, I'm not sure of the criteria that caused this assignment.

  9. #9
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    12,631
    Thanks
    161
    Thanked 936 Times in 856 Posts
    When I first loaded the Win 7 RC in a dual boot senario with Vista, using the windows boot loader (Vista had been installed already, I created a partition and loaded Win 7) I was not using a 3rd party Boot Manager at that time, whenever I booted into Vista, it was designated as "C" and Win 7 was designated as "D". When I booted into Win 7, Win 7 was designated as "C" and Vista was designated as "D". Now my dual boot is Win 7 Ultimate and Linux Mint Isadora, so I'm not sure how this would show up since Win 7 cannot see the Linux Partition. In my situation, my statement about the active drive being "C" no matter which OS was booted was indeed correct. Perhaps the RC was different that the RTM, but I think not.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  10. #10
    Gold Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Johnson City, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    3,202
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 215 Times in 202 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Myers View Post
    . In my situation, my statement about the active drive being "C" no matter which OS was booted was indeed correct. Perhaps the RC was different that the RTM, but I think not.
    Hello Ted, et-al
    This has been my experience as well ....Windows always makes whatever OS that i boot up (3rd party boot manager or not) C: and the other, whatever letter is available. Regards Fred
    PlainFred

    None are so hopelessly enslaved as those who falsely believe they are free (J. W. Von Goethe)

  11. #11
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Renton, Washington, USA
    Posts
    12,560
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    " Linux " systems will add a third party boot manager, so any time Linux is installed for a dual boot then the windows boot manager is not used.

    Now running HP Pavilion a6528p, with Win7 64 Bit OS.

  12. #12
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    South of the North Pole
    Posts
    919
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    " Linux " systems will add a third party boot manager, so any time Linux is installed for a dual boot then the windows boot manager is not used.
    True but that only covers one case among many describing no third party boot manager employment.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •