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  1. #1
    Star Lounger
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    Cyclic Redundancy Check

    My daughter has a new pc that is giving problems when accessing or saving to the floppy A:. Today, I went to her dorm and tried it. When I put in a blank floppy disk, the activity light never went out, and stayed on several seconds after I ejected it. While trying to save a test file to the disk, I got:
    Data Error(Cyclic Redundancy Check). I suspect a mechanical problem with A:. Any other ideas?
    David Carter
    David Carter

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    Re: Cyclic Redundancy Check

    How new is the PC? Has it just been moved to the dorm? I would recommend checking the ribbon cable connection to the drive (sounds like it has power alright). Even if it appears to be corrctly inserted, pull it out and reinsert it. As long as you don't force it, this generally works for me as the best way of making sure of the connection.
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    Re: Cyclic Redundancy Check

    Is there a trick to getting those power connectors in and out easily? I always have a h*ll of a struggle.
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    Plutonium Lounger Leif's Avatar
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    Re: Cyclic Redundancy Check

    The power connectors - red, yellow and blue 4-wire jobbies - are generally not a problem to get in and out. They are normally robust enough to allow you to pull on the cables (gently) to remove, and are clearly polarized for inserting.

    The ribbon data cable and connectors are the nasty ones, and I find that the 'top end' manufacturers spend a little more on them. All my Dells have 'finger loops' on the connectors to help pull them out. Getting them in the right way is not always that straightforward, there appear to be two methods of polarisation. Either one pin socket is blocked on the connector, with the corresponding pin missing on the drive, or there is a physical 'key' on the connector. Or both.

    To remove the wide connector, I find that the best way is to trap the ribbon cable between thumb and index finger as close to the connector as possible and holding as much of the cable as you can to spread the strain. The idea is to remove the connector in as straight a line as possible, so gentle tugs left-right-left-right to minimise the possiblity of bending the pins.

    Inserting the connectors should be straightforward, just make sure the connector is square with the pins and push in evenly along the connector length.

    That said, you are normally scuppered by limited access anyway.

    As for floppy drives, I would be lost if I actually depended on them. Floppies written to on one machine here, invariably can not be read on another. The basic design of your standard pc means that the cooling fans at the rear suck in dust, dog hair etc. through the floppy drive. (I suspect mine also suffer the side effects of passive smoking.)

    **

    But, to get back to the original problem, I would suspect 3 things.
    1] Physical damage, possibly through transportation. Try formatting a new disk and see if that works (i.e. can read the floppy). If that works, the chances are the floppy may not be readable on another drive.
    2] The data cable is partially out as Sparky suggests - check they are properly seated. Removing and replacing them can help if they are old as the individual pins could corrode, but this I think is not applicable if its new.
    3] The drive has simply failed internally or there is a problem with the mother board. If the pc is new, I wouldn't spend too much energy on it - it should be a warranty job.

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    Re: Cyclic Redundancy Check

    I've never had any problem with the ribbon data cable and connectors, it's those hideous white power things that I just don't seem to have the brute strength to seat. I've tried soaping them etc but they just never seem to go fully home.
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    Re: Cyclic Redundancy Check

    Thanks to all. She gave me 5 minutes to check it out, as she had "plans", so I told her to bring it in next week. The pc was built locally, so a replacement drive, if needed, should be quickly available.
    Thank you,
    David
    David Carter

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    4 Star Lounger
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    Re: Cyclic Redundancy Check

    I know what you mean. If it sometthing you are going to take in and out a lot, I would suggest something like PTFE lubricant: non-conductive and non-corrosive. It comes in a spray, but I wouldn't go spraying ot around the inside of the PC! Spray a liitle onto a saucer or somesuch and apply with a swab (or your finger).
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    Re: Cyclic Redundancy Check

    Hi Leif
    If you can't use floppies to move small files from one machine to another, what use are they? Useless for backing up or storing data : too small and lose their data too easily to be relied on for long-term storage. I have floppies that have held their data for years, but I've also had some nasty surprises.

    You must have a very poorly designed case if incoming air is drawn over the drive (the mechanical parts of which are enclosed anyway), since this presumably interferes with the unrestricted air-flow required by the chip assembly. The case fans on my system pull air in the front and side vents and expel it from the back, pulling it over the motherboard as it goes. The FDD is well above this direct air-stream.

    Floppies should be readable on any system, as should CDs. 'Should ' isn't certainty, though, and again I've had an occasional problem, though in this respect CDs are worse.

    David :
    In the case of a CRC error, I would suspect incomplete copying, or for a blank, the formatting has not been executed properly. Did you try to re-format - full, not quick?

    Rgds

  9. #9
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    Re: Cyclic Redundancy Check

    Hey, that sounds great. Is it like that stuff plumbers use for slotting pvc piping together?
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    Re: Cyclic Redundancy Check

    It would be so much better if every cable had the plastic loop for pulling them out. It could only really add a few pennies to the cost of the cable. It would be worth, say another fiver on the cost of a system to ensure that all the cables came out cleanly. breaking a pin on an IDE connection would be a lot more costly <img src=/S/shocked.gif border=0 alt=shocked width=15 height=15>
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    Re: Cyclic Redundancy Check

    Mostly in plumbing, I've seen it as tape; but sounds like the same thing. I have a can as a lubricant for drilling/routing.

    Router: say it one way, it's a woodworking tool; another way and you have a data network. Actually, does that work in American?
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  12. #12
    Plutonium Lounger Leif's Avatar
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    Re: Cyclic Redundancy Check

    Could be - the stuff we have sprays out looking white at first. It's also great stuff for getting rid of squeaks in cars - plastic trim that is, not the suspension!

    Word of warning, I believe that it is advisable NOT to smoke while using it - something about it becoming a poisonous mix ...

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    Re: Cyclic Redundancy Check

    That sounds like WD40.
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    Re: Cyclic Redundancy Check

    The stuff I used came in a tube and was like a soft jelly.

    <img src=/S/laugh.gif border=0 alt=laugh width=15 height=15> If you're John Cleese, they both sound exactly the same.
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    Plutonium Lounger Leif's Avatar
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    Re: Cyclic Redundancy Check

    The aerosol makes the same noise <img src=/S/grin.gif border=0 alt=grin width=15 height=15> but it is different stuff. It's not an oil, but a plastic called Polytetrafluoroethylene - otherwise known as Teflon.

    The real question is, of course, if nothing sticks to Teflon, how do they get it to stick to frying pans?

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